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Protesters across the country oppose GOP's health care plan

Protesters across the country oppose GOP's health care plan On Tuesday in Pittsburg, Kan., disability rights activists protested against the Senate Republican health care bill that would slash Medicaid funding and roll back Obama’s expansion of the program. They protested in Salt Lake City and in Colorado. It was just one small example of the grassroots effort to target Republican senators in their states that’s become a feature of the political world under Trump.


Yes he can: 'Clever boy' Obama returns to Indonesia for family vacation

Yes he can: 'Clever boy' Obama returns to Indonesia for family vacation From white water rafting in Bali to visiting temples on Java, former U.S. President Barack Obama's private family holiday is being closely tracked in Indonesia where he spent four years as a child. Obama was six when he moved to Jakarta after his American mother, Ann Dunham, married an Indonesian man following the end of her marriage to Obama's Kenyan father. "I feel proud that my friend became a president," said Sonni Gondokusumo, 56, a former classmate of Obama at the Menteng 01 state elementary school in Jakarta.


Suspect in Michigan airport stabbing to make court appearance

Suspect in Michigan airport stabbing to make court appearance A man charged with stabbing an airport police officer in an attack federal investigators are probing as an act of terrorism is expected to appear in a Michigan federal court on Wednesday. Amor Ftouhi, 49, of Quebec, Canada, was charged in federal court with violence at an international airport for stabbing officer Jeff Neville at the Bishop International Airport in Flint on June 21.


Can Democratic pediatrician Mai-Khanh Tran unseat one of the most powerful House Republicans in 2018?

Can Democratic pediatrician Mai-Khanh Tran unseat one of the most powerful House Republicans in 2018? In many ways, Dr. Mai-Khanh Tran isn’t all that different from millions of other Democrats who have been dismayed or depressed or indignant since Donald Trump was elected president. On election night, Tran watched in shock as the returns rolled in. The next morning, she wept at work — Tran is a pediatrician — with her colleagues.


School’s out, but universities are still fighting for their international students in wake of travel bans

School’s out, but universities are still fighting for their international students in wake of travel bans Earlier this year, Mustapha Ibrahim, a freshman at the University of Rochester in New York, had been planning to celebrate the end of Ramadan last weekend with his family in Somalia. Ibrahim had intended to return home over the summer after he finished his first year of school in the U.S., which also marked the first time he’d set foot in America.


Utah wildfire levels 13 homes, forces evacuation of 1,500 people

Utah wildfire levels 13 homes, forces evacuation of 1,500 people A fierce wildfire that has destroyed more than a dozen homes and forced the evacuation of 1,500 residents raged largely unchecked in southwestern Utah for an 11th day, as an army of firefighters struggled to corral the flames. As of Tuesday morning, the blaze had scorched nearly 50,000 acres, the bulk of that in the Dixie National Forest, with crews managing to carve containment lines around just 10 percent of the fire's perimeter, officials said. The fire erupted on June 17 near the ski resort of Brian Head, Utah, about 30 miles northeast of Zion National Park, and spread quickly as high winds drove flames into dense forests, threatening homes in nearby communities.


U.S. prosecutors seek to halt pretrial release of Uzbek terror suspect

U.S. prosecutors seek to halt pretrial release of Uzbek terror suspect The U.S. Attorney's Office in Denver filed an emergency motion with the federal 10th Circuit Court of Appeals to halt the release of Jamshid Muhtorov. The motion came four days after U.S. District Judge John Kane granted a motion by Muhtorov for his release pending his trial, which is set for early next year.


Alaska eyes Obamacare replacements with skepticism

Alaska eyes Obamacare replacements with skepticism In Alaska, the debate over the future of health care has taken on an urgency unlike that playing out in much of the lower 48 states.


Cosby says he has no plans for 'sexual assault tour'

Cosby says he has no plans for 'sexual assault tour' LOS ANGELES/NEW YORK (Reuters) - Bill Cosby said on Tuesday he has no plans to hold town hall events to discuss sexual assault, days after his spokesman suggested the comedian planned a series of public talks to educate men about how to avoid false accusations. Cosby's spokesman, Andrew Wyatt, first put forward the idea for the town hall talks in an interview with a Birmingham, Alabama, TV station last week, five days after Cosby's sex assault trial ended in a hung jury. The proposal drew immediate criticism from a lawyer representing some of the dozens of women who have leveled sex assault accusations at the 79-year-old entertainer, whose long career was built on a family-friendly style of comedy.


Linde's Lincare settles U.S. whistleblower case for $20 million

Linde's Lincare settles U.S. whistleblower case for $20 million The accord, confirmed by the U.S. Attorney's Office in Massachusetts, will resolve a lawsuit filed under the False Claims Act by former employees of the respiratory therapy services provider on behalf of the U.S. government. "The matter was resolved to the satisfaction of all involved parties, with no admission of liability by any party," Lincare said in a statement.


Judge reopens case of Colorado 'intersex' veteran denied passport

Judge reopens case of Colorado 'intersex' veteran denied passport A federal judge on Tuesday agreed to review the constitutionality of a U.S. State Department policy of refusing to grant passports to people who identify as neither male nor female. In November, U.S. District Judge R. Brooke Jackson directed the State Department to reconsider its "binary-only gender passport policy," in the case of Navy veteran Dan Zzyym, an “intersex” Colorado resident who sued the federal government for refusing to issue a passport because it requires an applicant to denote either male or female gender. After conducting its court-ordered review, the State Department last month again denied Zzyym’s application, according to a motion filed on the plaintiff's behalf by the Lambda Legal Defense Fund asking Jackson to reopen the case.


'Pharma bro' Martin Shkreli's notoriety slows New York jury selection

'Pharma bro' Martin Shkreli's notoriety slows New York jury selection Jury selection in the New York trial of former drug company executive Martin Shkreli will enter its third day Wednesday, after some potential jurors said they could not be fair to a man who gained notoriety by raising the price of a life-saving drug more than 5,000 percent. U.S. prosecutors have accused Shkreli, dubbed the "pharma bro," of running a Ponzi-like scheme at his former hedge fund and a drug company he once ran. Shkreli has pleaded not guilty to charges of securities and wire fraud.


Illinois House Democrats push new budget plan to end impasse

Illinois House Democrats push new budget plan to end impasse Staring down the start of a new fiscal year, Illinois House Democrats offered a budget on Tuesday that would spend less than the Republican governor's plan, but kept their specific revenue-raising proposal under wraps. An impasse between Governor Bruce Rauner and Democrats who control the legislature has left Illinois without complete budgets for an unprecedented two-straight fiscal years. The nearly $36.5 billion general funds budget was the first spending blueprint offered by House Speaker Michael Madigan for the fiscal year that begins Saturday.


Three weeks in July: Opposition groups gear up for next phase of health care fight

Three weeks in July: Opposition groups gear up for next phase of health care fight The longer the bill is out for the public to see, the better the odds of rallying support to halt it, progressives believe.


McConnell once praised ‘slow and steady deliberation.’ Why is he discarding that now?

McConnell once praised ‘slow and steady deliberation.’ Why is he discarding that now? Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell used to defend the institutions he's now discarding while pushing for a quick vote on the GOP health care bill.


Madoff settlements reach $12 billion with new accords

Madoff settlements reach $12 billion with new accords The trustee recouping money for Bernard Madoff's victims on Tuesday announced nearly $371 million of new settlements with two groups of offshore funds that invested with the imprisoned Ponzi schemer, boosting the total recovery to about $12 billion. Irving Picard, the trustee, said Lagoon Investment Ltd agreed to repay $240.7 million from an account through which Hermes International Fund Ltd invested with Madoff, while Thema Fund Ltd and an affiliate agreed to repay $130.1 million. Picard announced the settlements with British Virgin Islands-based Lagoon and Bermuda-based Thema one day after revealing more than $23 million of settlements with the estates of Madoff's late sons Andrew and Mark, and entities affiliated with the Madoff family.


President Trump hasn’t faced the White House press corps since February: Why it matters

President Trump hasn’t faced the White House press corps since February: Why it matters In his five months in office, Trump has held far fewer solo news conferences than any of his predecessors dating back to President Reagan.


Linde's Lincare settles U.S. whistleblower case for $20 million

Linde's Lincare settles U.S. whistleblower case for $20 million The accord, confirmed by the U.S. Attorney's Office in Massachusetts, will resolve a lawsuit filed under the False Claims Act by former employees of the respiratory therapy services provider on behalf of the U.S. government. "The matter was resolved to the satisfaction of all involved parties, with no admission of liability by any party," Lincare said in a statement.


Lockdown lifted at Alabama base after false reports of shooter

Lockdown lifted at Alabama base after false reports of shooter No threat was found and an investigation is under way to determine who made the calls from within a building where the shooter was reported to have been, Colonel Thomas Holliday, commander of the Redstone Arsenal, said at a press conference. "We have no evidence of shots actually (being) fired," Holliday said. Neither of those were credible, Holliday said.


Chicago officers charged in alleged cover-up of black teen shooting

Chicago officers charged in alleged cover-up of black teen shooting Three current and former Chicago police officers were indicted on Tuesday on felony charges for conspiring to cover up the shooting death of a black teenager by a white officer, prosecutors said. The indictments stem from a 2014 incident in which Laquan McDonald, 17, was shot to death. A video of the shooting, released in 2015, sparked days of protests and thrust Chicago into a national debate over the use of excessive force by police against minorities.


Some would-be immigrants left in limbo after Supreme Court travel ban order

Some would-be immigrants left in limbo after Supreme Court travel ban order Without close family in the United States, Elly and her husband had few options for getting permission to immigrate to America from Iran. "Since last year, we made all the important decisions in our lives because we hoped we would get a visa," Elly said, declining to give her full name because her visa application is still in process. The couple decided to put off having children and purchasing a home until after their move to the United States.


Supreme Court on Trump's travel ban: Why its tone sounds a bit different

Supreme Court on Trump's travel ban: Why its tone sounds a bit different The Supreme Court’s Monday ruling on President Trump’s proposed travel ban was certainly important on substance. Via a nine-to-zero vote, high court justices allowed Mr. Trump to prohibit entry into the US of some (but not all) people from majority-Muslim countries he declares to be dangerous. What it did not say may indicate volumes about the Supreme Court’s approach to this big, defining issue of the early Trump presidency.


New York mob suspects admit to vendetta arson, robbery

New York mob suspects admit to vendetta arson, robbery Three men, including the late mobster John Gotti's grandson, admitted on Tuesday that they torched a car because its driver cut off a reputed Bonanno crime family associate in traffic in April 2012, prosecutors said. Prosecutors said Vincent Asaro, 82, who was cleared in November 2015 of involvement in the famed 1978 Lufthansa airport heist that helped inspire the movie "Goodfellas," became enraged when a motorist moved in front of his car at a traffic light. John J. Gotti, Matthew "Fat Matt" Rullan and Asaro, an alleged member of the Bonanno crime family, pleaded guilty in U.S. District Court in Brooklyn to charges related to the arson and robbery under an agreement with federal prosecutors, said John Marzulli, a spokesman for Acting U.S. Attorney Bridget Rohde.


Family sues over fatal police shooting of Louisiana black man

Family sues over fatal police shooting of Louisiana black man The family of a black man killed last year by police in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, filed a wrongful death lawsuit against the city and police on Tuesday, alleging a history of excessive-force incidents and racism toward African-Americans. The death of Alton Sterling, 37, was among a series of racially charged police killings that inflamed a national debate over treatment of minorities by law enforcement. The lawsuit, filed in state court on behalf of Sterling's five children, seeks unspecified damages from the city, Police Chief Carl Dabadie Jr. and his department, and the two officers involved in the shooting, among others.


Colombian corruption watchdog charged in U.S. for money laundering

Colombian corruption watchdog charged in U.S. for money laundering Luis Gustavo Moreno Rivera, the national director of anti-corruption in Colombia, and Leonardo Luis Pinilla Gomez, an attorney practicing in the South American country, were charged in a criminal complaint filed in federal court in Miami. Both men were arrested in Colombia, federal prosecutors said. Attorneys for Moreno, 35, and Pinilla, 31, could not be immediately identified.


University of Texas at Dallas re-opens campus after bomb threat

University of Texas at Dallas re-opens campus after bomb threat The university tweeted at around 2:45 p.m. local time that all faculty, students, staff, and visitors needed to immediately leave buildings and parking garages on the campus, located roughly 18 miles (29 km) north of downtown Dallas, in Richardson. Campus police received the bomb threat around 2 p.m. local time from an anonymous caller who demanded a large amount of money, the Dallas Morning News quoted University of Texas at Dallas Police Department Lieutenant Ken MacKenzie as saying. Less than an hour later, university officials tweeted that campus police had determined the bomb threat was a hoax.


Connecticut will seek solution in Yale gender-neutral bathroom suit

Connecticut will seek solution in Yale gender-neutral bathroom suit A Connecticut official said on Tuesday the state would reconsider policies that can limit gender-neutral bathrooms in public buildings following a lawsuit by Yale University, the latest skirmish in the broader U.S. fight about gender identity. The Ivy League school said in the lawsuit it wants to designate all single-occupant restrooms at its law school as gender neutral, but the plan runs afoul of the state building code, which does not count gender-neutral bathrooms when it assesses whether a public building has enough toilets.


Reporter unloads on deputy press secretary at White House briefing: ‘What you just did is inflammatory!’

Reporter unloads on deputy press secretary at White House briefing: ‘What you just did is inflammatory!’ President Trump’s ongoing battle with the media boiled over during the White House press briefing on Tuesday when a reporter tore into Sarah Huckabee Sanders for complaining about the “constant barrage of fake news.”


EPA and Army Corps seek to rescind clean water rule

EPA and Army Corps seek to rescind clean water rule By Valerie Volcovici WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and Army Corps of Engineers released a proposal on Tuesday to repeal the 2015 Clean Water Rule, the latest move by the Trump administration to unwind environmental regulations put in place under former President Barack Obama. The agencies are working to rescind the rule, known as the Waters of the United States rule, and reinstate the language of the rule before it was changed in 2015. The rule updated the federal Clean Water Act to define what waterways - including streams, rivers and other bodies - can be regulated by the federal government, stirring anger by the agriculture and energy industries, which said it gave regulators too much authority.


Health care: vote delayed, but calls to address costs keep growing

Health care: vote delayed, but calls to address costs keep growing Senate Republicans have been forced into postponing major health care legislation in the United States Senate, and the backdrop is partly the difficult economics of health care: Costs for average Americans are high and rising, and the Senate legislation so far doesn’t appear to offer significant relief. The challenge was highlighted on June 26, as the Congressional Budget Office came out with its score of the Better Care Reconciliation Act released by Senate Republicans. The CBO predicted that premiums would rise faster than under current law, through 2019, for people who aren’t insured through an employer or a government program.


Trump resorts have a fake Time cover on the walls, featuring guess who?

Trump resorts have a fake Time cover on the walls, featuring guess who? The Washington Post reports at least four of President Trump's golf resorts have phony Time magazine covers featuring the commander in chief.


North Carolina man gets life in prison for plotting Islamic State attack

North Carolina man gets life in prison for plotting Islamic State attack Justin Sullivan, 21, of Morganton, was sentenced in federal court in Asheville on one count of attempting to commit an act of terrorism transcending national boundaries, the Justice Department said in a statement. Sullivan had pleaded guilty in November 2016, and the agreement with prosecutors called for the life sentence. Prosecutors said Sullivan conspired with Junaid Hussain, a British hacker who was an online recruiter of people to carry out attacks on behalf of the militant group Islamic State.


Ten Commandments monument installed in Arkansas; ACLU vows court fight

Ten Commandments monument installed in Arkansas; ACLU vows court fight Arkansas installed a Ten Commandments monument on the state's Capitol grounds on Tuesday, and a civil liberties group pledged a court challenge, saying it showed an unconstitutional government preference for a certain religion. Legislators approved the act for the monument in 2015, and whether it was appropriate for the public grounds has been debated since. At the installation ceremony for the some 3,000-pound (1,360 kg) granite slab in Little Rock, state Senator Jason Rapert noted that the Ten Commandments were chiseled into the portals of the U.S. Supreme Court.


Judge orders Minnesota to fund legislature through Oct. 1

Judge orders Minnesota to fund legislature through Oct. 1 Ramsey County District Court Chief Judge John Guthmann also ordered the state Senate to make rent and debt service payments for an office building and parking garage. Democratic Governor Mark Dayton touched off the legal battle with his line-item veto of funding for the Republican-controlled state legislature in the fiscal 2018-2019 biennial budget. Lawmakers sued Dayton earlier this month, claiming his May 30 veto of nearly $130 million for salaries, benefits and operating expenses was unconstitutional.


Supreme Court tosses ruling against religious school subsidies

Supreme Court tosses ruling against religious school subsidies The U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday threw out a lower court's ruling prohibiting the use of public funds to pay for children to attend private religious schools, a day after it issued a major ruling narrowing the separation of church and state. The justices ordered Colorado's top court to reconsider the legality of school "voucher" programs in light of Monday's ruling that churches and other religious entities cannot be categorically denied public money even in states whose constitutions explicitly ban such funding. In that ruling, which could bolster the case for vouchers and other subsidies to religious schools, the justices sided with a Missouri church that objected to being denied access to public grant money for a playground improvement project because the state's constitution bans public funding of religious entities.


New York City subway train derails, 34 injured

New York City subway train derails, 34 injured A New York City subway train derailed in upper Manhattan on Tuesday, causing minor injuries to 34 people and forcing the evacuation of passengers from dark, smoke-filled carriages, officials and witnesses said. Authorities said the southbound train struck a tunnel wall just before 10 a.m., causing two cars to derail near the 125th-street station in Harlem. The crash was being investigated, the city's Office of Emergency Management said.


Evangelical Christians becoming less opposed to gay marriage, poll finds

Evangelical Christians becoming less opposed to gay marriage, poll finds U.S. groups who traditionally have opposed same-sex marriage, including Republicans and white evangelical Christians, have become much less steadfast in their objections, according to a new Pew Research Center poll. Sixty-two percent of U.S. respondents now approve of same-sex marriage, up from 57 percent when the Supreme Court legalized it in all 50 states two years ago and from 37 percent in 2007, according to the survey, which was released on Monday. The survey found rising support for same-sex marriage across affiliations with political parties, race and religion, with support strongest among younger Americans born after 1980 and Democrats.


Delaware top court rules for Chicago Bridge in Westinghouse dispute

Delaware top court rules for Chicago Bridge in Westinghouse dispute The Delaware Supreme Court ruled in favor of Chicago Bridge & Iron Co on Tuesday in a $2 billion dispute with Westinghouse Electric Co that stems from cost overruns at a pair of unfinished U.S. nuclear power plants. Chicago Bridge shares soared after the court ended the battle over a 2015 deal in which Westinghouse, a unit of Japan's Toshiba Corp <6502.T>, bought the Shaw nuclear construction business of Chicago Bridge. Pittsburgh-based Westinghouse later sought an adjustment to the closing deal price by questioning Chicago Bridge's historical accounting, which Chicago Bridge said amounted to an attempt to recut the deal.


Watchdog group sues EPA to access communications with Icahn

Watchdog group sues EPA to access communications with Icahn A U.S. watchdog group filed a lawsuit in a federal court on Tuesday to force the Environmental Protection Agency to release communications with billionaire investor Carl Icahn, who it says tried to influence biofuels policy for personal gain. American Oversight, which has filed nearly a dozen lawsuits against the Trump administration on a range of issues, filed the suit after it did not get an "adequate" response from two Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) requests for communications between Icahn and representatives of his oil refining company CVR Energy Inc and EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt and senior agency officials.


Youth move: Why crown prince may struggle to win over young Saudis

Youth move: Why crown prince may struggle to win over young Saudis The naming of 31-year-old Mohammed bin Salman as Saudi Arabia's crown prince was more than a power play. For more than half a century, the Saudi throne has been passed down between the increasingly aging sons of state founder Abdulaziz Ibn Saud – transferring power between septuagenarians and octogenarians. Recommended: How much do you know about Saudi Arabia?


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