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Pope gives tough love to Mexico's political, church elite

Pope Francis is welcomed by Mexico's President Enrique Pena Nieto and first lady Angelica Rivera, upon his arrival at the Presidential palace in Mexico City, Saturday, Feb. 13, 2016. Francis kicked off his first trip to Mexico on Saturday with a long popemobile ride past cheering crowds on a day that will see him meet with the country’s political and church elite, and end with a silent prayer before the Virgin of Guadalupe. (AP Photo/Gregorio Borgia) MEXICO CITY (AP) — Pope Francis challenged Mexico's political and ecclesial elites on Saturday to provide their people with security, justice and courageous pastoral care to confront the drug-inspired violence and corruption that are wracking the country, delivering a tough-love message to Mexico's ruling classes on his first full day in the country.


Pope gives tough love to Mexico's political, church elite

Pope Francis is welcomed by Mexico's President Enrique Pena Nieto and first lady Angelica Rivera, upon his arrival at the Presidential palace in Mexico City, Saturday, Feb. 13, 2016. Francis kicked off his first trip to Mexico on Saturday with a long popemobile ride past cheering crowds on a day that will see him meet with the country’s political and church elite, and end with a silent prayer before the Virgin of Guadalupe. (AP Photo/Gregorio Borgia) MEXICO CITY (AP) — Pope Francis challenged Mexico's political and ecclesial elites on Saturday to provide their people with security, justice and courageous pastoral care to confront the drug-inspired violence and corruption that are wracking the country, delivering a tough-love message to Mexico's ruling classes on his first full day in the country.


As teeth-chattering temps move in, officials urge caution

Benedikt Vom Orde and Julia Felte, tourists from Essen, Germany, walk along Park Avenue in New York during a bitter cold spell, Saturday, Feb. 13, 2016. Bitter temperatures and biting winds had much of the northeastern United States bundling up for the some of the worst cold of the winter — a snap so bad it forced an ice festival in Central Park to cancel and caused an Interstate pileup that killed three. "These temperatures can be life threatening — especially for seniors, infants and people with medical conditions," New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio said. Stay indoors and take care of each other, he counseled. (AP Photo/Diane Bondareff) NEW YORK (AP) — Bitter temperatures and biting winds had much of the northeastern United States bundling up for the some of the worst cold of the winter — a snap so bad it forced an ice festival in Central Park to cancel and caused an Interstate pileup that killed three.


As teeth-chattering temps move in, officials urge caution

Benedikt Vom Orde and Julia Felte, tourists from Essen, Germany, walk along Park Avenue in New York during a bitter cold spell, Saturday, Feb. 13, 2016. Bitter temperatures and biting winds had much of the northeastern United States bundling up for the some of the worst cold of the winter — a snap so bad it forced an ice festival in Central Park to cancel and caused an Interstate pileup that killed three. "These temperatures can be life threatening — especially for seniors, infants and people with medical conditions," New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio said. Stay indoors and take care of each other, he counseled. (AP Photo/Diane Bondareff) NEW YORK (AP) — Bitter temperatures and biting winds had much of the northeastern United States bundling up for the some of the worst cold of the winter — a snap so bad it forced an ice festival in Central Park to cancel and caused an Interstate pileup that killed three.


State Department releases more than 1,000 pages of Clinton emails

State Department Releases More Than 1,000 Pages of Clinton Emails The State Department today made publicly available online 551 documents comprising 1,012 pages from former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton’s email account. Combined with the department’s previous document releases –- which totaled 44,818 pages -– the total count of Clinton documents released is now 45,830 pages. Earlier this week a federal judge ordered the State Department speed up production of Clinton's emails, a process that was supposed to be completed by the end of January.


State Department releases more than 1,000 pages of Clinton emails

State Department Releases More Than 1,000 Pages of Clinton Emails The State Department today made publicly available online 551 documents comprising 1,012 pages from former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton’s email account. Combined with the department’s previous document releases –- which totaled 44,818 pages -– the total count of Clinton documents released is now 45,830 pages. Earlier this week a federal judge ordered the State Department speed up production of Clinton's emails, a process that was supposed to be completed by the end of January.


U.S. sources: Russia forging alliance with Taliban

Growing evidence of Russian support of the Afghan Taliban worries U.S.

U.S. sources: Russia forging alliance with Taliban

Growing evidence of Russian support of the Afghan Taliban worries U.S.

Two teen girls found shot dead at school in Phoenix suburb

Two 15-year-old girls died on Friday in a shooting at a high school in the Phoenix suburb of Glendale and were found with a gun beside them, police said. Glendale police spokeswoman Tracey Breeden said it was too early to determine if the incident at Independence High involved a suicide.

Two teen girls found shot dead at school in Phoenix suburb

Two 15-year-old girls died on Friday in a shooting at a high school in the Phoenix suburb of Glendale and were found with a gun beside them, police said. Glendale police spokeswoman Tracey Breeden said it was too early to determine if the incident at Independence High involved a suicide.

Obama’s budget request comes amid sexual assault investigation backlog

Over the past decade or so, the DOE's Office of Civil Rights, which is tasked with enforcing laws against discrimination of all kinds in educational programs, including Title IX, has watched its workload double while it’s resources have remained the same.

Obama’s budget request comes amid sexual assault investigation backlog

Over the past decade or so, the DOE's Office of Civil Rights, which is tasked with enforcing laws against discrimination of all kinds in educational programs, including Title IX, has watched its workload double while it’s resources have remained the same.

Auschwitz survivors testify at former SS sergeant's trial

DETMOLD, Germany (AP) — Three Holocaust survivors testified Friday about the horrors they experienced at the Auschwitz the death camp, on the second day of the trial of a former SS sergeant on 170,000 counts of accessory to murder.

Auschwitz survivors testify at former SS sergeant's trial

DETMOLD, Germany (AP) — Three Holocaust survivors testified Friday about the horrors they experienced at the Auschwitz the death camp, on the second day of the trial of a former SS sergeant on 170,000 counts of accessory to murder.

Ukraine sees Russian hand in cyber attacks on power grid

By Pavel Polityuk KIEV (Reuters) - Hackers used a Russian-based internet provider and made phone calls from inside Russia as part of a coordinated cyber attack on Ukraine's power grid in December, Ukraine's energy ministry said on Friday. The incident was widely seen as the first known power outage caused by a cyber attack, and has prompted fears both within Ukraine and outside that other critical infrastructure could be vulnerable. The ministry, saying it had completed an investigation into the incident, did not accuse the Russian government directly of involvement in the attack, which knocked out electricity supplies to tens of thousands of customers in central and western Ukraine and prompted Kiev to review its cyber defenses.

Boeing shares drop on accounting fears, competitive threats

A line-up of Boeing 747s and 787 Dreamliners are pictured at the Boeing production facility in Everett The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission is investigating whether Boeing properly accounted for the costs and expected sales of two of its biggest jetliners, the 747 and 787, Bloomberg reported on Thursday, citing people with knowledge of the matter. The SEC, under Chair Mary Jo White, has stepped up scrutiny of corporate accounting practices. On Wednesday, Boeing said that competitive pressures from rival Airbus were prompting it to cut middle-management and executive ranks at its commercial airplane unit to reduce costs.


FireEye reports 4Q loss

The Milpitas, California-based company said it had a loss of 87 cents per share. Losses, adjusted for stock option expense and amortization costs, were 36 cents per share. The results surpassed Wall Street ...

Nokia leaves investors in dark over outlook

The Nokia headquarters is seen in Espoo By Jussi Rosendahl HELSINKI (Reuters) - Finnish telecom gear maker Nokia warned that demand for new mobile networks would slow this year in China and said it would not give a financial outlook until April following its acquisition of Alcatel-Lucent. The 15.6 billion euro deal helps Nokia to compete with Sweden's Ericsson and China's Huawei previously the world's top two suppliers of network gear, in a market where limited growth and tough competition are pressuring prices. Nokia CEO Rajeev Suri said the company expected market growth this year in North America, India, the Middle East and Africa, while fast growing China will cool down.


Senate committee backs nominee for OPM director after breach

WASHINGTON (AP) — A Senate committee is backing President Barack Obama's nominee to head the Office of Personnel Management.

Concerned by cyber threat, Obama seeks big increase in funding

By Dustin Volz and Mark Hosenball WASHINGTON (Reuters) - President Barack Obama on Tuesday sought a surge in funding to counter cyber security threats, as his top intelligence official warned Congress that computer attacks were among the most imminent security challenges facing the United States. In his fiscal 2017 budget proposal, Obama asked for $19 billion for cyber security across the U.S. government, an increase of $5 billion over this year While the White House's overall fiscal plan faces tough going in the Republican-controlled Congress, increased cyber security funding has won bipartisan support of lawmakers in the past. The request comes as the Obama administration has struggled to address the growing risk posed by criminals and nation states in the digital world.

U.S. lawmakers seek to bar states from mandating encryption weaknesses

A lock icon, signifying an encrypted Internet connection, is seen on an Internet Explorer browser in Paris By Dustin Volz WASHINGTON (Reuters) - U.S. House of Representatives lawmakers will introduce bipartisan legislation on Wednesday that would prohibit states from requiring tech companies to build encryption weaknesses into their products. The move marks the latest foray into an ongoing debate over encryption between Silicon Valley and Washington. While tech companies generally oppose weakened security standards, federal authorities have warned about a "going dark" phenomenon in which criminal suspects use powerful encryption in their communications so that investigators cannot access a phone's content, even with a warrant.


Akamai beats revenue estimates; unveils $1 billion share buyback plan

Online content distributor Akamai Technologies Inc reported better-than-expected quarterly revenue, helped by higher demand for its security services, and announced a $1 billion share buyback program. Akamai's shares rose 16 percent to $45.90 in after-hours trading on Tuesday. The upbeat results soothed investors' nerves after a selloff in the broader tech sector in the past few days, which was triggered by disappointing sales outlook from LinkedIn Corp and Tableau Software.

Obama seeks cybersecurity boost to replace 'ancient' tech

President Barack Obama meets with members of this national security team and cybersecurity advisers in the Roosevelt Room of the White House in Washington,Tuesday, Feb. 9, 2016. At right is Lisa Monaco, assistant to the president for Homeland Security and Counterterrorism. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais) WASHINGTON (AP) — President Barack Obama said Tuesday he is asking Congress for $3.1 billion to update the government's archaic computer systems to protect them from cyberattacks as part of a new, centralized effort to boost cybersecurity.


Hackers are offering to pay $23,000 for valid Apple employee login details

Apple has a high regard for security and secrecy, but that doesn’t mean hackers have simply given up the dream of accessing this particular fortress. In fact, a new report says that in Ireland, hackers are ready to pay up to €20,000, or approximately $23,000, to Apple employees willing to sell their login details. DON’T MISS:  5 secret features hiding inside your iPhone "You'd be surprised how many people get on to us, just random Apple employees," a source told Business Insider . "You get emails offering you thousands [of euros] to get a password to get access to Apple. I could sell my Apple ID login information online

Here’s one iPhone lock screen security exploit you shouldn’t worry about

A newly discovered iPhone vulnerability can bypass your lockscreen code, but it will probably not affect you anytime soon. Security researcher Benjamin Kunz Mejri from Vulnerability Laboratory stumbled upon an authentication issue that affects iPhones and iPads running iOS 8 and iOS 9 . DON’T MISS: Fresh iPad Air 3 leak reveals more details about Apple's most exciting tablet in years Using this security hole, hackers could in theory access the data behind your lockscreen password. But in practice, the procedure is a little more complicated than that, as hackers would have to gain physical access to the iPhone or iPad in question. Furthermore, they would have to be able to manage an unlocked

US peacekeeping expert to coordinate sexual abuse response

UNITED NATIONS (AP) — Jane Holl Lute, a U.S. security expert who has held top posts in U.N. peacekeeping, was appointed by Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon on Monday to coordinate improvements in the United Nations' response to allegations of sexual exploitation and abuse by peacekeepers.

Justice, Homeland Security probe hack of U.S. agency employee data

By Mark Hosenball WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The U.S. Department of Homeland Security and the Justice Department are investigating a claim that personal data related to thousands of DHS and FBI employees was hacked and has been posted online, an agency spokesman said on Monday. The tech website Motherboard reported on Sunday that a hacker, who Motherboard said wished to remain anonymous, intended to dump onto the Internet names, job titles, email addresses and official phone numbers of over 9,000 DHS employees and another 20,000 Federal Bureau of Investigation workers.

Awesome list of 17 ‘Breaking Bad’ references hidden in ‘Better Call Saul’

I'm not typically a fan of TV spinoffs, but Better Call Saul has seemingly broken the spinoff curse that plagues shows looking to capitalize off of the success of previous hits. To be sure, following up Breaking Bad would be a daunting task for any show, but Better Call Saul works precisely because it's not trying to perfectly mirror all the elements that made Vince Gilligan's meth-fueled drama so addictive and compelling. Rather, Better Call Saul seeks to carve out its own unique and independent nook within the larger Breaking Bad universe, and it does so quite successfully. DON'T MISS:  Intern caught sleeping on his second day of work gets trolled by the entire Internet At the same time,

Exclusive: Top cybercrime ring disrupted as authorities raid Moscow offices - sources

View of building which houses an office of 25 Floor Film Company in Moscow By Joseph Menn WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Russian authorities in November raided offices associated with a Moscow film distribution and production company as part of a crackdown on one of the world’s most notorious financial hacking operations, according to three sources with knowledge of the matter. Cybersecurity experts said a password-stealing software program known as Dyre — believed to be responsible for at least tens of millions of dollars in losses at financial institutions including Bank of America Corp and JPMorgan Chase & Co — has not been deployed since the time of the raid. Experts familiar with the situation said the case represents Russia’s biggest effort to date to crack down on cyber-crime.


Unhackable brain scans may some day replace passwords

Security breaches affecting millions of users have come to light in recent years, yet we’re no better at protecting our personal data, or at picking good passwords , than we were before. But some companies are already looking at new ways to secure customer data that go beyond passwords and PINs. Fingerprint sensors are found on more and more smartphones in recent years, and retina scanners are coming too. But in the future, we may have an even more advanced way of logging into online services and protecting our data: Brain scans. UP NEXT:  20 paid iPhone and iPad apps on sale for free right

Lawyer: New York-born man was mistreated after terror arrest

NEW YORK (AP) — The lawyer for a New York City-born man serving a 15-year prison sentence for supporting al-Qaida urged a judge Friday to find the U.S. government liable for failing to quickly diagnose a medical condition after his 2010 arrest, but a federal prosecutor said he was treated properly.

In Obama's final year, Senate is slow to act on his nominees

This April 17, 2014, photo, provided by the U.S. Army, shows then-Maj. Gen. John W. Nicholson, Jr. speaking to his senior leaders at Fort Bragg, N.C. If you wear combat fatigues to work, then your nomination is almost sure to sail through the Senate. If not, you’re likely in for a long wait. In just a week, senators confirmed Nicholson to be the next top American commander in Afghanistan. (Sgt. Mikki L. Sprenkle/U.S. Army via AP) WASHINGTON (AP) — If you wear combat fatigues to work, then your nomination is almost sure to sail through the Senate. If not, you're likely in for a long wait.


How to play the secret chess game hidden in Facebook Messenger

Hundreds of millions of people spend hours of their lives on Facebook every week, but there are some secrets that only a few of them have discovered. For example, last December, a member of the Chess subreddit community found a secret, playable chess game hidden in Facebook Messenger that anyone can play. READ MORE:  Follow these 5 steps to keep yourself safe from hackers In order to start a game, just open a Messenger conversation with a friend and type "@fbchess play" to begin. A chess board will suddenly appear in the chat box and the player with the white pieces moves first. But despite the fact that a visual representation of the board appears on screen, you'll have to

Follow these 5 steps to keep yourself safe from hackers

No matter how secure you think your devices are, someone could access your data if they put their mind to it. It's just the reality of the Information Age, but you should still do everything in your power to make yourself less of a target for hackers . DON'T MISS:  20 paid iPhone and iPad apps on sale for free right now In an extensive piece for The Wall Street Journal this week , Geoffrey A. Fowler laid out a five-step checklist that shouldn't take more than an hour to complete, and might be the difference between having your data stolen or not. Here are just a few of the most important steps you should take: First, update everything. Start with the operating

Rice aides, Powell got classified info on personal email accounts

Former U.S. Secretary of State Powell salutes the audience as he takes the stage at the Washington Ideas Forum in Washington By Mark Hosenball WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Former U.S. Secretary of State Colin Powell and aides to his successor, Condoleezza Rice, both received classified information a handful of times via personal email accounts, the top Democrat on a congressional oversight panel said on Thursday. The findings come after nearly a year of controversy over Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton's decision to set up a private email server for her work as secretary of state. Representative Elijah Cummings said the disclosures about Powell's and Rice's aides' emails were made by the State Department's inspector general, who is reviewing the email practices of the last five secretaries of state.


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