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Exclusive: In Ecuador cyber heist, thieves moved $9 million to 23 Hong Kong firms

A branch of the Banco del Austro is seen in Quito By Clare Baldwin and Nathan Layne HONG KONG/CHICAGO (Reuters) - Cyber thieves who stole $12 million from an Ecuadorian bank in 2015 routed the funds through 23 companies registered in Hong Kong, some of them with no clear business activity, according to previously unreported court filings and judicial rulings. The court papers offer a first glimpse into where some of the money was moved after it reached accounts in Hong Kong. The filings stem from a lawsuit filed in early 2015 by Ecuador's Banco del Austro (BDA) in Hong Kong against the web of companies that received or handled more than $9 million in stolen funds, bank records submitted to the territory's Court of First Instance show.


Don text and drive in Canada, or cops will bust you with this camera rig

Texting and driving is a menace that's up there with chugging vodka while at the wheel, and cops the world over are slowly cracking down on it. But how do you catch errant texters? With a DSLR and some serious glass, if you're Canada's Mounties. DON'T MISS:  Microsoft’s just turned Windows 10 into malware A  CBC News  report spotted by  PetaPixel   shows RCMP officers in British Columbia using a new set-up to catch drivers who are texting and driving at intersections. The rig consists of a DSLR, a 50mm lens, and a target-shooting spotting scope. It's a reasonably affordable set of kit -- certainly cheaper than a 500mm zoom lens -- but it should be good enough to capture photos of offenders from three-quarters of a mile away. That's bad news for anyone who likes to drive distracted. Even if you think it's reasonable to check your phone at a red light, it's illegal under Canadian law, and the Mounties are coming for your texts. The good news for distracted drivers is that due to the limitations of the rig (and in general, limitations of trying to photograph a car going at 70mph), it's only going to work at intersections for now. To catch highway phone users, cops are going to be relying on the old-fashioned Mk. 1 eyeball for now. Canada's set-up is the lastest in a list of technology to catch distracted drivers. Legislation was recently introduced in New York state to give cops "textalyzers," devices that could be used on driver's phones after a crash to see if they had been using it in the run-up to an accident. A spotting scope is a little more old-school, but nonetheless effective in issuing tickets.

11 states sue over Obama's school transgender directive

Republican Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton, right, announces Texas' lawsuit to challenge President Obama's transgender bathroom order during a news conference in Austin, Texas, Wednesday May 25, 2016. Texas and several other states are suing the Obama administration over its directive to U.S. public schools to let transgender students use the bathrooms and locker rooms that match their gender identity. (Jay Janner/Austin American-Statesman via AP) AUSTIN CHRONICLE OUT, COMMUNITY IMPACT OUT, INTERNET AND TV MUST CREDIT PHOTOGRAPHER AND STATESMAN.COM, MAGS OUT; MANDATORY CREDIT AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — Texas and 10 other states are suing the Obama administration over its directive to U.S. public schools to let transgender students use the bathrooms and locker rooms that match their gender identity.


11 states sue over Obama's school transgender directive

Republican Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton, right, announces Texas' lawsuit to challenge President Obama's transgender bathroom order during a news conference in Austin, Texas, Wednesday May 25, 2016. Texas and several other states are suing the Obama administration over its directive to U.S. public schools to let transgender students use the bathrooms and locker rooms that match their gender identity. (Jay Janner/Austin American-Statesman via AP) AUSTIN CHRONICLE OUT, COMMUNITY IMPACT OUT, INTERNET AND TV MUST CREDIT PHOTOGRAPHER AND STATESMAN.COM, MAGS OUT; MANDATORY CREDIT AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — Texas and 10 other states are suing the Obama administration over its directive to U.S. public schools to let transgender students use the bathrooms and locker rooms that match their gender identity.


Police outnumber protesters outside Trump California rally

A man is detained by Anaheim Police officers outside the Anaheim Convention Center before Republican U.S. Presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks at a campaign event in Anaheim By Emily Stephenson, Steve Gorman and Ginger Gibson ANAHEIM, Calif. (Reuters) - Protesters at a rally in Southern California held by Donald Trump on Wednesday carried signs saying "Stop Nazi Trump" and "Make America Hate Again," as a large police presence stood by a day after a Trump event in New Mexico erupted into chaos. Police outnumbered the 100 demonstrators outside the convention center where Trump, who is the presumptive Republican nominee in the Nov. 8 presidential election, was speaking. Many were unhappy about Trump's views on Hispanic immigrants and ripped apart a piñata resembling Trump and placed the paper mache head on top of a flagpole with a large Mexican flag.


Police outnumber protesters outside Trump California rally

A man is detained by Anaheim Police officers outside the Anaheim Convention Center before Republican U.S. Presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks at a campaign event in Anaheim By Emily Stephenson, Steve Gorman and Ginger Gibson ANAHEIM, Calif. (Reuters) - Protesters at a rally in Southern California held by Donald Trump on Wednesday carried signs saying "Stop Nazi Trump" and "Make America Hate Again," as a large police presence stood by a day after a Trump event in New Mexico erupted into chaos. Police outnumbered the 100 demonstrators outside the convention center where Trump, who is the presumptive Republican nominee in the Nov. 8 presidential election, was speaking. Many were unhappy about Trump's views on Hispanic immigrants and ripped apart a piñata resembling Trump and placed the paper mache head on top of a flagpole with a large Mexican flag.


What to Know About the New Taliban Commander After US Drone Strike

What to Know About the New Taliban Commander After US Drone Strike Mawlawi Haibatullah Akhundzada, previously the deputy to Mansur, will take command of the extremist group, according to a Taliban spokesperson. The group released a photo of Akhundzada with the announcement. Just hours after Akhundzada’s leadership was announced, the Taliban claimed responsibility for a suicide bombing of a minivan in Kabul, which killed at least 10 people.


What to Know About the New Taliban Commander After US Drone Strike

What to Know About the New Taliban Commander After US Drone Strike Mawlawi Haibatullah Akhundzada, previously the deputy to Mansur, will take command of the extremist group, according to a Taliban spokesperson. The group released a photo of Akhundzada with the announcement. Just hours after Akhundzada’s leadership was announced, the Taliban claimed responsibility for a suicide bombing of a minivan in Kabul, which killed at least 10 people.


Exclusive: Bangladesh probes 2013 hack for links to central bank heist

bangladesh By Krishna N. Das and Ruma Paul DHAKA (Reuters) - Bangladesh police are reviewing a nearly forgotten 2013 cyber heist at the nation’s largest commercial bank for connections to February's $81 million heist at the country's central bank, a senior law enforcement official said on Wednesday. The unsolved theft of $250,000 at Sonali Bank involved fraudulent transfer requests sent over the SWIFT international payments network. It is not widely known outside of Bangladesh, and in fact was treated as a cold case until Bangladesh police revived the investigation after thieves in February also used the SWIFT network to steal $81 million from Bangladesh Bank.


Oops! Trump campaign sends email seeking dirt to reporter instead of adviser

Oops! Trump campaign sends email seeking dirt to reporter instead of adviser Politico obtained an email from Trump campaign adviser Michael Caputo to the Republican National Committee asking a researcher to provide information on the Whitewater real estate scandal, and the email came to light when Trump campaign spokeswoman Hope Hicks responded instead to Politico reporter Marc Caputo — no relation.


Oops! Trump campaign sends email seeking dirt to reporter instead of adviser

Oops! Trump campaign sends email seeking dirt to reporter instead of adviser Politico obtained an email from Trump campaign adviser Michael Caputo to the Republican National Committee asking a researcher to provide information on the Whitewater real estate scandal, and the email came to light when Trump campaign spokeswoman Hope Hicks responded instead to Politico reporter Marc Caputo — no relation.


State Department email probe slams Hillary Clinton

State Department email probe slams Hillary Clinton A report by the State Department inspector general sharply criticizes Hillary Clinton’s use of a private email system, concluding that the former secretary of state violated federal rules and ignored warnings from underlings that she was putting her communications at risk of foreign hacking. Rep. Trey Gowdy, R-S.C., the chairman of the committee investigating the 2012 attack on American diplomats in Benghazi, immediately issued a statement saying the findings vindicate his panel’s efforts.


State Department email probe slams Hillary Clinton

State Department email probe slams Hillary Clinton A report by the State Department inspector general sharply criticizes Hillary Clinton’s use of a private email system, concluding that the former secretary of state violated federal rules and ignored warnings from underlings that she was putting her communications at risk of foreign hacking. Rep. Trey Gowdy, R-S.C., the chairman of the committee investigating the 2012 attack on American diplomats in Benghazi, immediately issued a statement saying the findings vindicate his panel’s efforts.


Chicago’s gun violence: Can an algorithm stop the bloodshed?

Chicago’s gun violence: Can an algorithm stop the bloodshed? Chicago police are using an algorithm to detect the likelihood that someone will become the perpetrator or victim of the stubbornly high gun violence that has plagued the city.


Chicago’s gun violence: Can an algorithm stop the bloodshed?

Chicago’s gun violence: Can an algorithm stop the bloodshed? Chicago police are using an algorithm to detect the likelihood that someone will become the perpetrator or victim of the stubbornly high gun violence that has plagued the city.


Unconventional #18: Inside the new book that details how GOP delegates could wriggle out of nominating Trump (and more!)

Unconventional #18: Inside the new book that details how GOP delegates could wriggle out of nominating Trump (and more!) In his new book, a Republican National Committee official claims that his fellow delegates don’t have to nominate Trump in Cleveland. Curly Haugland is on a mission: He wants every one of the 2,472 delegates heading to this summer’s Republican convention to know that the press, the party leaders and even the chairman of the GOP are wrong. According to the longtime RNC committeeman and pool-supply magnate from Bismarck, N.D., Republican delegates are not obligated by the outcome of their state’s primary or caucuses to vote for a certain candidate on the first ballot in Cleveland — despite what almost everyone else seems to believe.


Unconventional #18: Inside the new book that details how GOP delegates could wriggle out of nominating Trump (and more!)

Unconventional #18: Inside the new book that details how GOP delegates could wriggle out of nominating Trump (and more!) In his new book, a Republican National Committee official claims that his fellow delegates don’t have to nominate Trump in Cleveland. Curly Haugland is on a mission: He wants every one of the 2,472 delegates heading to this summer’s Republican convention to know that the press, the party leaders and even the chairman of the GOP are wrong. According to the longtime RNC committeeman and pool-supply magnate from Bismarck, N.D., Republican delegates are not obligated by the outcome of their state’s primary or caucuses to vote for a certain candidate on the first ballot in Cleveland — despite what almost everyone else seems to believe.


Key findings from inspector general report on Clinton emails

WASHINGTON (AP) — Key findings from the State Department inspector general's report on former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton's emails and private server and the department's email practices:

Report: Upgraded Xbox One with 4K, Oculus Rift support will launch in 2017

With less than a month to go until E3 2016 , the rumor mill has begun to kick into high gear. On Wednesday, Kotaku published a report claiming that Microsoft will release a cheaper, smaller Xbox One before the end of the year while an upgraded Xbox One console with upgraded specs will launch in 2017. DON'T MISS:  Microsoft’s just turned Windows 10 into malware According to Kotaku's sources, the upgraded Xbox carries the codename Scorpio, and will have a more powerful GPU than the current model. Sources also say that the new console will be able to support the Oculus Rift , which is why Microsoft is currently working to partner with Oculus in the months leading up to launch. As for the smaller Xbox One, there's a chance it will come equipped with a 2TB hard drive, although Kotaku couldn't offer many more details regarding the 2016 console. Providing the smaller Xbox One is real, we'll probably see it at E3 . Together, these two consoles make up a new strategy that sources are calling "Project Helix." This strategy will see the companies two major platforms, Windows and Xbox, come together as one. Developer sources tell Kotaku that Microsoft is going to require games to be made available for both platforms in the future. Finally, it appears that both of these consoles are part of a new iterative approach to console releases that will continue throughout the hardware generation. Sources say that Microsoft will continue to release new hardware on a more consistent basis than ever before, while keeping its games compatible with as much of the available hardware as it possibly can at once. We'll likely hear more about these plans when Microsoft takes the stage at E3 2016 on Monday, June 13th at 9:30 a.m. PDT. You can read all about the company's currently announced plans for E3 right here .

Clinton faulted on emails by State Department audit

Clinton email use broke federal rules: inspector's report Hillary Clinton and her team ignored clear guidance from the State Department that her email setup broke federal standards and could leave sensitive material vulnerable to hackers, an independent audit has found. The inspector general’s review also revealed that hacking attempts forced then-Secretary of State Clinton off email at one point in 2011, though she insists the personal server she used was never breached. Clinton and several of her senior staff declined to be interviewed for the State Department investigation.


Why higher interest rates could actually be good for the housing market

A single family home is shown under construction by Toll Brothers Inc, the largest U.S. luxury homebuilder, in Carlsbad, California During Toll Brothers' second-quarter conference call on Tuesday afternoon, Chairman Robert Toll said that rate increases could actually spur demand.


Why higher interest rates could actually be good for the housing market

A single family home is shown under construction by Toll Brothers Inc, the largest U.S. luxury homebuilder, in Carlsbad, California During Toll Brothers' second-quarter conference call on Tuesday afternoon, Chairman Robert Toll said that rate increases could actually spur demand.


Microsoft just turned Windows 10 into malware

For months now, Microsoft has done everything in its power to shove  Windows 10 down your throat. The free update is mandatory at this point, and we’ve heard from many Windows users who discovered their computers updated to the newest version automatically , without their knowledge or explicit permission. Microsoft kept offering excuses for these annoying occurrences, and even said it will stop pushing upgrades to Windows users refuse to hope aboard the Windows 10 train. Now, the company has come up with its most evil trick yet to get you to update your PC to Windows 10, and it's based on the same methodology hackers use to trick people into installing malware. DON'T MISS:  New free app and site makes watching online videos like regular TV channels Pop-ups often appear when you visit malicious websites and when you click the "X" to close them, malware is installed on your computer. Well, Microsoft just tweaked its Windows 10 upgrade alert pop-up so that the update is triggered when clicking the X, PC World explains . The Get Windows X app that pushes the update prompt has recently changed the behavior of the “X” button. Earlier, users would have been able to dismiss the pop-up by pressing the button, as you would expect. But you can’t do that anymore. Pressing the X now has a different function. It tells the company you’re happy to have your computer updated at the time shown inside the pop-up. The only way to get rid of it is to change the update time manually. But of course, that’s not intuitive at all and many people are about to be tricked into upgrading. The trick is disingenuous at best, since Microsoft isn’t technically doing anything wrong. It’s just turning the function of the X button from “close and do nothing” to “close and upgrade later.” You know, without explaining this tiny change to anyone. Come July 29th, Microsoft will stop prompting users to upgrade, Business Insider reminds us, so make sure you change your Windows 10 upgrade time to August or later!

Vietnamese rapper freestyles for a beatboxing Obama

President Obama capped his historic three-day visit to Vietnam with a town hall in Ho Chi Minh City, where he was unexpectedly serenaded by a young female rapper. Suboi, a local known as Vietnam’s “Queen of Hip-Hop,” was called on to ask a question at the event, but the president interrupted her to request she do a freestyle for him. “Do you need a little beat?” Obama asked, briefly beatboxing a sample bass line.

Vietnamese rapper freestyles for a beatboxing Obama

President Obama capped his historic three-day visit to Vietnam with a town hall in Ho Chi Minh City, where he was unexpectedly serenaded by a young female rapper. Suboi, a local known as Vietnam’s “Queen of Hip-Hop,” was called on to ask a question at the event, but the president interrupted her to request she do a freestyle for him. “Do you need a little beat?” Obama asked, briefly beatboxing a sample bass line.

Huawei files lawsuits accusing Samsung of violating patents

In this May 13, 2016 photo, Chinese sales representatives wait for customers at a Huawei retails shop in Beijing, China. Chinese tech giant Huawei said Wednesday, May 25 it has filed patent infringement lawsuits against South Korean mobile phone rival Samsung in the United States and China, in a case that highlights the rise of Asian competitors as technology creators. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan) BEIJING (AP) — Chinese tech giant Huawei said Wednesday it has filed patent infringement lawsuits against South Korean mobile phone rival Samsung in the United States and China, in a case that highlights the rise of Asian competitors as technology creators.


Top Asian News 3:38 a.m. GMT

TOKYO (AP) — Leaders of the Group of Seven rich nations will undoubtedly voice unity over fighting terrorism, pandemics and tax evasion at their summit in Japan this week. Finding a consensus on how to breathe life into their sluggish economies is proving more elusive. Aging workforces, sagging productivity and lingering damage from the 2008 financial crisis are complicating efforts to spur growth while the effects of the slowdown in China and the other big developing economies ripple across the globe. At a pre-summit meeting in northern Japan's Sendai, finance ministers and central bank governors of the G7 failed to concur on a coordinated approach to fighting what Nobel prize-winning economist Joseph E.

China's Huawei files patent suits against Samsung Elec

People walk past a sign board of Huawei at CES Asia 2016 in Shanghai By Yimou Lee and Anne Marie Roantree HONG KONG (Reuters) - Huawei Technologies Co Ltd [HWT.UL] on Wednesday said it sued Samsung Electronics Co Ltd claiming infringement of smartphone patents, the Chinese firm's first intellectual property challenge against the world's top mobile maker. Huawei has filed lawsuits in the United States and China seeking compensation for what it said was unlicensed use of fourth-generation (4G) cellular communications technology, operating systems and user interface software in Samsung phones. "We hope Samsung will ... stop infringing our patents and get the necessary license from Huawei, and work together with Huawei to jointly drive the industry forward," Ding Jianxing, president of Huawei's Intellectual Property Rights Department, said in a statement.


Samsung Elec to defend interests against Huawei patent suits

A man speaks on his mobile phone near a Samsung store in central Kiev SEOUL (Reuters) - Tech giant Samsung Electronics Co Ltd said on Wednesday it will defend itself against patent lawsuits filed by smartphone rival Huawei Technologies Co Ltd [HWT.UL]. Huawei, the world's third-largest smartphone maker, has filed lawsuits against Samsung in the United States and China claiming infringement of smartphone patents. "We will thoroughly review the complaint and take appropriate action to defend Samsung's business interests," Samsung, the world's top smartphone maker, said in an email to Reuters. (Reporting by Se Young Lee; Editing by Stephen Coates)


Apple rehires prominent security pro as encryption fight boils

People wait in line for the grand opening of the next generation Apple Store in San Francisco, California By Joseph Menn SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) - Apple Inc , which has resisted pressure from U.S. law enforcement to unlock encrypted iPhones, this month rehired a top expert in practical cryptography to bring more powerful security features to a wide range of consumer products. Jon Callas, who co-founded several well-respected secure communications companies including PGP Corp, Silent Circle and Blackphone, rejoined Apple in May, an Apple spokesman said. Callas had worked at Apple in the 1990s and again between 2009 and 2011, when he designed an encryption system to protect data stored on a Macintosh computer.


China's Huawei sues Samsung Electronics claiming mobile patent infringement

People walk past a sign board of Huawei at CES Asia 2016 in Shanghai By Yimou Lee and Anne Marie Roantree HONG KONG (Reuters) - Huawei Technologies Co Ltd [HWT.UL] said on Wednesday it has filed lawsuits against Samsung Electronics Co Ltd claiming infringement of smartphone patents, in the first such case by the Chinese firm against the world's biggest mobile maker. Huawei has filed lawsuits in the United States and China seeking compensation for what it said was unlicensed use of fourth-generation (4G) cellular communications technology, operating systems and user interface software in Samsung phones. "We hope Samsung will ... stop infringing our patents and get the necessary license from Huawei, and work together with Huawei to jointly drive the industry forward," Ding Jianxing, president of Huawei's Intellectual Property Rights Department, said in a statement.


Pebble just re-invented the iPod Shuffle, and it runs Spotify

Back in the days before RunKeeper and GPS watches, my jogs were a beautifully simple thing: I strapped on an iPod Shuffle loaded with a strong mix of Britney and Eminem, and vanished into my own little world for an hour. A couple years later, I transitioned to Spotify and never really looked back. But running with an armband and a 5-inch phone never felt quite the same, and clearly other people agree. That's why I'm absurdly happy that Pebble, a small Canadian company that makes wearables, is making a Shuffle-sized device that clips on to your shorts, plays your Spotify playlists, and tracks runs. DON'T MISS: iPhones will finally get the OLED screens they deserve The Core is a $70 device about the same size as an old Shuffle, complete with a little clip. It allows you to store Spotify playlists on the 4GB of built-in storage, or stream them over a 3G connection. It also has built-in GPS and integration with popular apps like RunKeeper and Strava, so you can track your workouts. Finally, it builds in an emergency SOS button using that cellular radio, so you still have the comfort value of not being completely cut off from the world in an emergency. It feels like someone's sat down, thought about what my ideal device would be to take running or biking, and then built that. It's a stripped-down machine for people who just want to know how far they've run, and listen to music along the way. My only concern is the controls: Core only has two buttons, so you'll really need to pair it to a Pebble smartwatch over Bluetooth to make the most of it. Pebble actually has other plans for the Core beyond just workouts. As Pebble points out, Core is really just a tiny Android 5.0-powered computer, complete with a full suite of sensors like GPS and microphones, and Bluetooth, Wi-Fi and cellular connectivity. Pebble is making the device completely open to hackers, so you can expect a bunch of Core-powered lifehacks coming soon. Alongside the Core, Pebble also revamped its line of smartwatches with a new focus on fitness. The Pebble 2 is a $100 smartwatch that looks a lot like the original Pebble, but with the notable addition of built-in heartrate tracking. The Pebble Time 2 is an update to last summer's Pebble Time Steel, with a color e-ink display and heart-rate monitoring again. Overall, the smartwatch updates stick to Pebble's core philosophy of the simpler, the better. Pebble watches have buttons instead of touchscreens, and week-long battery life rather than 24 hours. They're meant to be smartwatches for people who mostly want a watch, only with this update, they're now also cheap and powerful fitness trackers. All three devices are up for pre-order on Kickstarter right now, Pebble's tried-and-tested method of selling products. The Core is $69 with delivery in January next year, Pebble 2 is $99 in September this year, while the Pebble Time 2 is $169, delivery November 2016.

Saudi Arabia's rulers adapt message for social media age

Saudi men explore social media on their mobile devices as they sit at a cafe in Riyadh By Sylvia Westall and Angus McDowall DUBAI/RIYADH (Reuters) - The participation of tens of thousands of young Saudis in a social media debate over plans to reform the kingdom's oil-reliant economy last month marked a shift in how Riyadh's conservative rulers interact with their subjects. Saudi Arabia's dynastic leaders, who rule by fiat and strictly limit public dissent, have historically courted public opinion only via informal councils with tribal, religious and business leaders or citizens seeking to petition them. "It's a new focus for the government as it reaches out to a young Saudi population that is more likely to use social media," Saudi analyst and commentator Mohammed Alyahya said.


Japan an alluring target for Standard Bank ATM thieves

People stand outside 7-Eleven convenience store outside headquarters of Seven & I Holdings in Tokyo The gang used counterfeit Standard Bank credit cards to withdraw 1.4 billion yen ($13 million) in 14,000 transactions from ATMs at 7-Eleven convenience stores over three hours on a Sunday morning, according to a source familiar with the matter.


SWIFT to unveil new security plan after hackers' heists

Photo illustration of the SWIFT logo By Huw Jones and Tom Bergin LONDON (Reuters) - The SWIFT secure messaging service that underpins international banking said on Tuesday it plans to launch a new security program as it fights to rebuild its reputation in the wake of the Bangladesh Bank heist. The Society for Worldwide Interbank Financial Telecommunication (SWIFT)'s chief executive, Gottfried Leibbrandt, told a financial services conference in Brussels that SWIFT will launch a five-point plan later this week. In February, thieves hacked into the SWIFT system of the Bangladesh central bank, sending messages to the Federal Reserve Bank of New York allowing them to steal $81 million.