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World’s Oldest Intact Shipwreck Discovered In The Black Sea

World’s Oldest Intact Shipwreck Discovered In The Black Sea The world's oldest intact shipwreck has been discovered more than a mile


'Dinosaur country': fossil hunters' S. African paradise

'Dinosaur country': fossil hunters' S. African paradise The sun rises over the South African bush as scientists laden with backpacks climb a hillside. Jonah Choiniere and his team from Johannesburg's Witwatersrand University had tracked the reptile from another age for three years. The search brought them to a stretch of farmland in the central town of Rosendal, where they are surrounded by cattle and impalas.


Tiny pieces of plastic ‘are inside all of us’, new research warns

Tiny pieces of plastic ‘are inside all of us’, new research warns This is very disturbing


A prehistoric mammal relative looked like a weasel and had 38 babies at once

A prehistoric mammal relative looked like a weasel and had 38 babies at once There’s a wonderfully undone quality to Earth’s earliest mammals and their relatives. These Jurassic-era critters don’t look like the prototypes for today’s felids or canids so much as the beta versions, still entirely in development. They are primitive both literally and esthetically—snaggle of tooth and small of brain. About 185 million years ago, or 25…


Brexit Raises Concern U.K. Will Lose Key Scientists, Funds

Brexit Raises Concern U.K. Will Lose Key Scientists, Funds Researchers in Britain worry that a sharp break in ties with the European Union or failure to work out a deal could lead to an exodus of highly skilled specialists, curtail funding and hinder collaboration. The concerns extend beyond the U.K. with scientists warning that Brexit could hurt Europe after decades of gains fueled by the flow of ideas and people across borders. In a survey of more than 1,000 staff members at the Francis Crick Institute, the U.K.’s biggest biomedical research lab, 97 percent of scientists said that a “hard Brexit” would have an adverse impact on U.K. science.


World’s oldest intact shipwreck ‘could rewrite Ancient Greek history’

World’s oldest intact shipwreck ‘could rewrite Ancient Greek history’ It's lain undisturbed for 2,400 years


Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin Quietly Met With the Saudi Crown Prince in Wake of Khashoggi's Killing

Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin Quietly Met With the Saudi Crown Prince in Wake of Khashoggi's Killing As international outrage over the killing of dissident journalist Jamal Khashoggi continues, Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin quietly met with Saudi Arabia’s crown prince on Monday.


Indian court eases firecracker ban even as pollution soars

Indian court eases firecracker ban even as pollution soars India's top court on Tuesday eased a ban on fireworks for a major Hindu festival despite air pollution in New Delhi and other cities again reaching danger levels. The Supreme Court, which last year banned firecrackers for the Diwali festival, rejected a new call for a ban in the capital amid growing concern over pollution. Firecrackers set off for the Hindu festival of lights add to the toxic mix created by farmers burning crop stubble, diesel engines, coal-fired power plants and industrial emissions.


China Officially Launched the World's Longest Sea Bridge Linking Hong Kong and Macau to the Mainland

China Officially Launched the World's Longest Sea Bridge Linking Hong Kong and Macau to the Mainland The 34-mile mega-bridge connects Hong Kong, Zhuhai and Macau


Titanic II Will Set Sail in 2022 Following the Same Route as the Original

Titanic II Will Set Sail in 2022 Following the Same Route as the Original The Titanic II will trace the original's planned route from England to New York


You Can't Have it All! Male Birds Are Either Good Singers or Very Attractive New Study Reveals

You Can't Have it All! Male Birds Are Either Good Singers or Very Attractive New Study Reveals Study Shows Male Birds are Either Good Singers or Very Attractive


Brazil's Amazon at risk if Bolsonaro wins presidency: ecologists

Brazil's Amazon at risk if Bolsonaro wins presidency: ecologists Promises by Brazil´s far-right presidential candidate Jair Bolsonaro and his entourage bode badly for the future of the Amazon -- called the "lungs of the planet" -- if he wins, environmentalists warn. "If he's elected, that will be the beginning of the end for the Amazon," his leftist rival in Sunday´s run-off, Fernando Haddad, said last week. Bolsonaro has also several times evoked studies to build hydroelectric power stations in the Amazon, which implies the construction of massive dams that would greatly impact water courses and require communities to be moved.


Has Trump Met the Burden of Proof for Ripping Up an Arms Deal With Russia?

Has Trump Met the Burden of Proof for Ripping Up an Arms Deal With Russia? Citing classified intelligence, President Donald Trump revealed the intention to withdraw from an arms control treaty with Russia.


A North Carolina Police Officer Fatally Shot a Black Motorist During a Traffic Stop

A North Carolina Police Officer Fatally Shot a Black Motorist During a Traffic Stop A white North Carolina police officer shot and killed a black motorist who stepped out of his vehicle with a gun


President Trump's Midterm Arguments: Mobs, Immigration and the Economy

President Trump's Midterm Arguments: Mobs, Immigration and the Economy President Donald Trump laid out his version of the choice in the midterm elections: "Republicans produce jobs, Democrats produce mobs"


Judge slashes award but upholds verdict in Monsanto cancer trial

Judge slashes award but upholds verdict in Monsanto cancer trial A San Francisco judge on Monday upheld a jury verdict that found Monsanto liable for not warning a groundskeeper that its weed killer product Roundup might cause cancer, but slashed the damages award. Judge Suzanne Bolanos denied Monsanto's request for a new trial but cut the $289 million damages award to $78 million to comply with the law regarding how punitive damages awards must be calculated. Jurors in August unanimously found that Monsanto acted with "malice" and that its weed killers Roundup and the professional grade version RangerPro contributed "substantially" to Dewayne Johnson's terminal illness.


Obama Rails Against Republicans in Fiery Nevada Rally

Obama Rails Against Republicans in Fiery Nevada Rally Former President Barack Obama delivered a biting critique of Republicans in Washington and President Donald Trump’s administration on Monday but avoided mentioning his successor by name.


Museum of the Bible Says 5 Dead Sea Scroll Fragments Are Fake

Museum of the Bible Says 5 Dead Sea Scroll Fragments Are Fake Testing found that five fragments are "inconsistent with ancient origin"


President Trump Threatened to Turn Back Caravan Migrants If They Don't Claim Asylum in Mexico. That's Not Legal

President Trump Threatened to Turn Back Caravan Migrants If They Don't Claim Asylum in Mexico. That's Not Legal If migrants want to seek asylum in the United States, they have the right to try


Young climate activists say their lawsuit should go to trial

Young climate activists say their lawsuit should go to trial SEATTLE (AP) — Young activists who are suing the U.S. government in a high-profile climate change lawsuit say the case poses important constitutional questions that should be fully evaluated at trial next week.


New Study Reveals Chocolate Labs Have Shorter Lifespan Than Their Yellow and Black Counterparts

New Study Reveals Chocolate Labs Have Shorter Lifespan Than Their Yellow and Black Counterparts Study Says Chocolate Labs Have Shorter Lifespans Than Other Labs


Donald Trump’s election was a 'traumatic experience' for many college students

Donald Trump’s election was a 'traumatic experience' for many college students To say that the 2016 presidential election had a profound impact on the American psyche might be an understatement.  In fact, new research suggests that for many, the experience was actually traumatic.  In a survey of roughly 800 college students, 25 percent reported such high levels of stress after the election that researchers likened it to symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder, according to a new study published in the Journal of American College Health.  Throughout the election, researchers noticed some pretty strong reactions in young adults. But the day after the election, lead researcher Melissa Hagan taught two classes where she saw that students were visibly upset — some were even crying.  Anti-Trump buttons are for sale at a protest against Donald Trump's presidency in 2016.Image: Getty ImagesThat, in combination with some polls in circulation discussing politically-caused “stress” drove her and her colleagues to look into how exactly the election affected certain people, Hagan said via email.  Hagan and her team administered a psychological assessment called the Impact of Event Scale, which is a standard quick measure to gauge how a person responded to trauma, and they tailored the questions to the presidential election.  They found that some college students were reporting that they were impacted by the election “in such a way that it might lead to diagnosable post-traumatic stress disorder,” Hagan said in a statement.  Some common symptoms of that kind of stress are chronic fatigue, physical illness, stomach or chest pain, and feeling overwhelmed. Results of the survey found that certain groups scored higher on the assessment than others.  For example, Black and Hispanic students reported higher levels of stress than their white peers. Women scored about 45 percent higher than men. And Democrats scored two and a half times higher on the assessment. Non-Christians also reported feeling strongly affected by the election results. However Hagan said it's important to note that the presidential election itself does not technically constitute a traumatic event.  Protesters gather outside of the military recruitment center in Time Square to protest Trump's policies.Image: Getty ImagesAccording to the American Psychological Association, in order for an event to be considered traumatic, “it is required that the person was exposed to: death, threatened death, actual or threatened serious injury, or actual or threatened sexual violence,” Hagan said.  That said, media coverage of the new administration's potential policies, some which have already been enacted, were perceived as life-threatening to some Americans. Moreover, many didn’t believe Donald Trump would be elected — especially not after the Access Hollywood tape was released, which might have been triggering for women and men who are survivors of sexual assault. Psychotherapist and author Jonathan Alpert, who is unaffiliated with the study, said the study’s results do not come as a shock to him.  “It wasn’t politics as usual," Alpert, who wasn't involved in the new study, said in an interview.  An officer watches on as protesters in Phoenix, Arizona gather.Image: Getty ImagesIn the months following the election, Alpert — like many other psychologists — noticed widespread young adult upheaval on both sides of the political spectrum.  It's possible that the shared outrage of college students could reinforce their levels of stress, Alpert said. "It’s almost like a contagion effect. You could almost catch stress from one another — like empathy," he said. Barbara Nosal, Chief Clinical Officer at the mental health facility Newport Academy who is also unaffiliated with the study, said in an interview that the degree of impact also might have to do with where young adults are in their lives. The competitive college environment, technology, and an undefined sense of independence already affects young adult development — plus, the election was an additional stressor.  Then presidential-candidate Donald Trump speaks at a rally in Rochester, New York.Image: Getty Images“Their reaction to the election may have just compounded negativity on top of all of the other pieces of their of identity,” Nosal said.  Nosal said the depth of a reaction is also dependent on the individual person or their most salient demographic, not necessarily the stressor itself.  “Maybe a comment or something that occurs afterwards in their personal life brings the trauma up — plus ongoing discussions in the media may also trigger a traumatic response," Nosal said.  And while the survey couldn’t reveal any long-term impacts since the assessment was only administered once — if these symptoms are left unresolved, Nosal said anxiety disorders and depression may follow.  As to whether or not the clinical levels of stress vary based on the overarching political ideology of the school, Hagan thinks "it may be that symptoms are higher in states more 'left-leaning,'" but more research would have to be done to know for sure.  WATCH: Is it a bird? Is it a plane? No. It's an inflatable Trump baby flying around London


Man Dies After Falling From Cruise Ship Headed to the Bahamas

Man Dies After Falling From Cruise Ship Headed to the Bahamas A man has was killed after falling on board a ship headed from Florida to the Bahamas, authorities confirm.


Trump Is Hitting the Midterm Campaign Trail Hard. History Shows That Doesn't Always Make a Difference

Trump Is Hitting the Midterm Campaign Trail Hard. History Shows That Doesn't Always Make a Difference "His intervention in the primaries was the most dramatic since the 1938 purge campaign," one expert in presidential history says of President Trump's midterm season


Mexico highlights in Latin American Astronomy and Astronautics Olympiad

Mexico highlights in Latin American Astronomy and Astronautics Olympiad Puebla, Mexico, Oct. 22 (Notimex).- The National Institute of Astrophysics, Optics and Electronics (INAOE, for its acronym in Spanish), reported that Mexican high school students won gold, silver and an honorable mention when competing in the X Latin American Olympiad of Astronomy and Astronautics (OLAA, for its acronym in Spanish). In a statement, the institute said that this meeting was held from the 14 to the 19 of this month in the city of Ayolas, Paraguay, and in this tenth edition of the Olympiad participated young people from Argentina, Brazil, Bolivia, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, Uruguay, Panama, Paraguay and Mexico. It added that the INAOE also carries out activities to prepare those selected, both remotely and during stays made by selected young people in the facilities of Tonantzintla, Puebla. In the OLAA various tests are carried out, among which are a theoretical individual consisting of the resolution of theoretical astronomy exercises; an individual recognition of constellations and celestial objects; a theoretical by teams, and one of elaboration and launching of water rockets. It added that in the tenth edition of the OLAA Nancy Ruiz Dominguez, a student of the high school of the University of La Salle Bajio Juan Alonso campus of Torres de Leon, Guanajuato, obtained honorable mention. On the other hand, Alan Poisot Palacios, from the Wexford School in Queretaro, won a silver medal, and Oscar Angulo Flores, from the Colegio de Bachilleres in the State of Sonora, Reforma de la Ciudad de Hermosillo, won a gold medal and an award for the best individual theoretical test. NTX/JGS/HAR/GVG/BBF


UNAM launches electronic catalog of academic services

UNAM launches electronic catalog of academic services Mexico, Oct. 22 (Notimex).- The National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM, for its acronym in Spanish) has launched an electronic platform to promote and publicize its products and services in the academic world. In this platform, interested parties can contract a service or consult a project of researchers from more than 70 entities of the university, as well as search by keyword or through different sections. Clara Lopez Guzman, Director of Special Projects of the Coordination of Innovation and Development, explained that it is COGNOS-UNAM www.cognos.unam.mx, an electronic catalog with access to developments developed in the maximum house of studies. That is, technical and clinical services, as well as training, and adds laboratories, technologies and publications that may be susceptible to transfer, especially patents and software, which contribute to the country's development. "Through a simple search engine, those interested in hiring a service or consult some knowledge of our researchers and their projects, can do a search by keyword or through different sections," she said. COGNOS exists since 2015, but had worked only internally. Now, within the framework of the first decade of the existence of the Coordination of Innovation and Development (CID, for its acronym in Spanish), this platform opens up to the productive, public, private and social sectors. Starting this month, the CID begins its relationship with industry chambers and industries so that they know about it. The system puts the user in contact with a linker, who will attend directly, and then personalized, the initial request that was made online. This network has periodic meetings, workshops and courses where they receive training to meet a profile that allows them to sign agreements, provide services and make economic proposals and advice on how to charge and bid. Lopez Guzman indicated that the linkers have the task of putting in contact and encouraging, where appropriate, new lines of research, and perhaps the creation of a patent, and a company with that patent. "That would be a great success story, where COGNOS would be the seed," she concluded. NTX/ERM/DAP/BBF


Giant mice threaten rare seabirds on remote British island

Giant mice threaten rare seabirds on remote British island Mice brought to a remote South Atlantic island by sailors in the 19th century are threatening seabirds including the critically endangered Tristan albatross, a British charity said on Monday. The Royal Society for the Protection of Birds said the rodents have proliferated on uninhabited Gough Island, part of a British overseas territory, and are killing two million birds every year. "We knew there were large numbers of chicks and eggs being beaten each year but the actual number being taken by the mice is just staggering," Alex Bond, a researcher from the Natural History Museum in London, said in a statement released by the RSPB.


Medtronic co-founder who created wearable pacemaker dies

Medtronic co-founder who created wearable pacemaker dies MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — Earl Bakken, an electronics repairman who created the first wearable external pacemaker and co-founded one of the world's largest medical device companies, Medtronic, has died. He was 94.


This perfectly rectangular iceberg would like to object to your ideas of natural geometry

This perfectly rectangular iceberg would like to object to your ideas of natural geometry At some point someone said, “there are no right angles in nature,” and then everyone believed that person. Precise right angles might be hard to come by, but approximate right angles are everywhere. Salt crystals are cubic in nature. Many trees form approximate right angles with the ground. And recently NASA found an Antarctic iceberg…


Mars May Have Enough Oxygen to Sustain Subsurface Life

Mars May Have Enough Oxygen to Sustain Subsurface Life The ingredients for life are richer than we thought.


Prince Harry Wants Meghan Markle to Have a Baby Girl and People Couldn't Be More Excited

Prince Harry Wants Meghan Markle to Have a Baby Girl and People Couldn't Be More Excited The Duke and Duchess of Sussex are expecting their first child together


Stephen Hawking's archive to be donated to the nation to help his family pay inheritance tax 

Stephen Hawking's archive to be donated to the nation to help his family pay inheritance tax  A large part of the archive of Stephen Hawking will be donated to the nation to help his family pay millions in inheritance tax it has emerged. Professor Hawking, who died on March 14 this year, left an estate valued at around £15 million. Now his family have asked Christie's, the autioneers, to value his archive so that a large proportion can be donated to the nation through the Acceptance in Lieu process which since 2011 has allowed valuable cultural works to be given instead of death duties. It is likely to be then donated to public museums.  The auction house said it had submitted the archive to the Arts Council and an announcement of the items involved would be made soon. Some 22 items belonging to Hawking, including his seminal work on black holes from 1974 and one of his wheelchairs is to be sold on a public online auction at Christies. Other lots include a selection of his medals and awards, a copy of his best-selling ‘A Brief History of Time’ (1988) signed with a thumbprint, a bomber jacket, and the script for one of his appearances on The Simpsons. Lucy Hawking, the astrophysicist's daughter, said: "We hope to be able to offer our father’s archive to the nation through the Acceptance in Lieu process as we feel it is a huge part of his legacy but also of the history of science in this country. "We are also giving admirers of his work the chance to acquire a memento of our father’s extraordinary life in the shape of a small selection of evocative and fascinating items. "In addition, we will be auctioning one of our father’s historic wheelchairs, the proceeds of which will be donated to the Motor Neurone Disease Association and the Stephen Hawking Foundation." Stephen Hawking's wheelchair  A highlight of the auction is Prof Hawking’s thesis typescript, which is expected to sell for up to £150,000. When Professor Stephen Hawking’s PhD thesis was made available online by Cambridge University in October 2017, it proved so popular that it crashed the University’s website. When he wrote his thesis in October 1965, Hawking was already suffering with the early symptoms of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (‘ALS’), and it was his wife Jane, whom he had married three months earlier, who typed out the 117 pages of the document, painstakingly adding the mathematical equations by hand.  The thesis is signed in Hawking’s distinctively shaky handwriting, with the statement ‘This dissertation is my original work. S.W. Hawking’. The sale is expected to raise £200,000. Thomas Venning, Head of the Books and Manuscripts department, Christie’s London comments:  It has been a huge privilege for Christie’s to work on this selection of objects from the estate of one of the most brilliant minds of the last half-century. "The lots selected for sale highlight Professor Hawking’s remarkable achievements in science alongside his unique personality and inspirational life story. "The sale concludes with Professor Hawking’s wheelchair, in which he both toured the world as a successful scientific communicator, and from which his mind voyaged to the outer reaches of space-time, making it literally and figuratively one of the most-travelled wheelchairs in history." Documents and files by Stephen Hawking  Credit:  Frank Augstein AP Of the 22 lots featured in the sale, 12 are offprints of Hawking’s most important papers, including ‘Origin of Structure in the Universe’, ‘Spectrum of Wormholes’ and ‘Fundamental Breakdown of Physics in Gravitational Collapse’, illustrated below. The online sale ‘On the Shoulders of Giants’ will present these offprints alongside rare and important autograph letters and manuscripts by leading scientific forebears including Isaac Newton, Charles Darwin and Albert Einstein. News regarding this auction will be announced in the coming days.


From 'problem child' to 'prodigy'? LSD turns 75

From 'problem child' to 'prodigy'? LSD turns 75 Lysergic acid diethylamide was labelled a "problem child" by the man who discovered its hallucinogenic properties in 1943: as it turns 75, the drug known as LSD may now be changing its image. The late Swiss chemist Albert Hofmann famously learned of LSD's psychedelic effects when he inadvertently took a small dose while doing lab work for pharmaceutical company Sandoz. The book, in which Hofmann sought to reassert LSD's potential medical benefits, is featured in an exhibition at the Swiss National Library in the capital, Bern, to mark 75 years since the discovery.


Germany Stops Exporting Arms to Saudi Arabia After Killing of Jamal Khashoggi

Germany Stops Exporting Arms to Saudi Arabia After Killing of Jamal Khashoggi Germany announced plans to stop exporting arms to Saudi Arabia in the wake of the killing of dissident journalist Jamal Khashoggi


Lebanese seek to save landmark concrete park from crumbling

Lebanese seek to save landmark concrete park from crumbling Close to the seafront in Lebanon's Tripoli, giant curves of concrete stand testimony to dreams before the civil war, etchings of an exhibition park never finished but already cracking. This month, a rare exhibition is being held at the site designed by legendary Brazilian architect Oscar Niemeyer in a desperate call to save it from ruin. Inside the vast grey grounds of the Tripoli International Fair in northern Lebanon, a palm tree throws its dark silhouette onto a giant concrete dome.


Taiwan's President Calls for Investigation After the Worst Train Crash in Decades

Taiwan's President Calls for Investigation After the Worst Train Crash in Decades Taiwan's president pressed for a quick, transparent probe into the cause of the island's worst train crash in nearly three decades


French Teenager Who Threatened His Teacher With a Fake Gun Was Charged

French Teenager Who Threatened His Teacher With a Fake Gun Was Charged President Emmanuel Macron said threatening a teacher was "unacceptable"


Japan firms fined $3.4 million over maglev bid-rigging

Japan firms fined $3.4 million over maglev bid-rigging Two major construction companies were Monday ordered to pay fines totalling more than $3 million for colluding to win contracts on Japan's multi-billion-dollar maglev project. The state-of-the-art maglev -- magnetic levitation -- trains are scheduled to begin commercial service between Tokyo and Nagoya in central Japan in 2027, later extending to the western hub of Osaka. The Japan Fair Trade Commission brought charges against four companies in March for suspected anti-trust violations, accusing them of sharing estimated costs for construction work.


Reports That the Trump Administration Plans to 'Erase' Transgender Definition Spark Alarm

Reports That the Trump Administration Plans to 'Erase' Transgender Definition Spark Alarm The Trump administration reportedly wants to narrowly define gender as fixed and determined by birth


Roche lands Tecentriq trial win, still trails Merck in lung cancer

Roche lands Tecentriq trial win, still trails Merck in lung cancer Roche's Tecentriq plus chemotherapy boosted lung cancer patients' survival by nearly five months, study data released on Monday showed, underscoring benefits of the Swiss group's immunotherapy but still leaving it trailing a rival's drug. Tecentriq added to a chemotherapy backbone of carboplatin/nab-paclitaxel in first-line non-squamous non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) boosted median overall survival (OS) to 18.6 months, Roche said, compared to 13.9 months for those getting just chemotherapy. Survival without the disease worsening (PFS) was lifted to 7 months for patients getting Tecentriq plus chemotherapy, Roche said, versus 5.5 months for the chemotherapy group.


Congolese Rebels Stage Deadly Attack Stalling Ebola Containment Efforts

Congolese Rebels Stage Deadly Attack Stalling Ebola Containment Efforts Congolese rebels killed 15 civilians and abducted a dozen children in an attack at the epicenter of the latest deadly Ebola outbreak


Japanese Nobel chemistry laureate Shimomura dies at 90

Japanese Nobel chemistry laureate Shimomura dies at 90 TOKYO (AP) — Japanese-born Marine biologist Osamu Shimomura, who won the Nobel Prize in chemistry, has died. He was 90.


Australia's Prime Minister Formally Apologized to Child Sex Abuse Victims

Australia's Prime Minister Formally Apologized to Child Sex Abuse Victims Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison said the nation must acknowledge child sex abuse victims' long, painful journey


Turkey to Publicize Details From Its Investigation Into Jamal Khashoggi's Killing

Turkey to Publicize Details From Its Investigation Into Jamal Khashoggi's Killing In a sign of growing pressure on Saudi Arabia, Turkey said it will announce details of its investigation


'Headless chicken monster' caught on camera off East Antarctica

'Headless chicken monster' caught on camera off East Antarctica In the deep, dark Southern Ocean encircling Antarctica lies a creature so bewildering and elusive, it hasn't been filmed for a year.  Behold, the 'headless chicken monster,' which has been filmed casually swimming near East Antarctica, the first time it's been filmed in the region.  Except that it's not headless, a chicken, or a monster. It's a sea cucumber. SEE ALSO: So, turns out snakes have been hitchhiking on planes. Have a nice flight. Deep-sea resident Enypniastes eximia, also known as the 'headless chicken monster' to undeniably hilarious scientists, has been filmed in the Southern Ocean. Researchers caught the unusual species of swimming sea cucumber with a new underwater camera system, which has been developed by the Australian Antarctic Division, part of Australia’s Department of the Environment and Energy, for monitoring commercial long-line fishing. It's the first time the bright pink creature has been filmed in the Southern Ocean, as it has only ever been caught on camera around the Gulf of Mexico, according to the AAD. According to a 1990 study published in Smithsonian Contributions to the Marine Sciences, the sea cucumber ranges from 6 to 25 cm (2.3 to 9.8 inches) in length and "swims almost continuously, briefly settling to the seafloor to ingest surface sediments."  It uses tiny little tentacles to rapidly grasp this sediment from the seafloor to eat, and propels its bulbous, translucent body forward using a webbed veil. If you're truly perplexed, here's another look at the creature, filmed by the Okeanos Explorer for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) in 2017 in the Gulf of Mexico — the last time the sea cucumber was filmed.  Some of this footage appears in the new AAD video for context, if some clips look familiar (they're the frames that read "file vision" in the above video). So, how did they film it this time around? The deep-sea cameras that luckily caught this perplexing creature are recording important data for commercial fishing and marine conservation, all of which is sent to the Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources (CCAMLR), the international body in charge of managing the Southern Ocean. They're thrown into the water attached to fishing gear, and can reach depths of up to three kilometres (1.86 miles). So, you'd be right to assume they'd need to be pretty durable.  Two of the underwater cameras developed to enhance the sustainability of long line fishing in the Southern Ocean.Image: Jessica Fitzpatrick/AAD"We needed something that could be thrown from the side of a boat, and would continue operating reliably under extreme pressure in the pitch black for long periods of time," Australian Antarctic Division program leader Dirk Welsford, said in a statement.  "Some of the footage we are getting back from the cameras is breathtaking, including species we have never seen in this part of the world." According to Welsford, other nations such as Chile, France, and the United Kingdom are now also using the durable cameras to survey and monitor the impact of commercial fishing on marine environments. "Most importantly, the cameras are providing important information about areas of sea floor that can withstand this type of fishing, and sensitive areas that should be avoided," he said. "It’s a really simple and practical solution which is directly contributing to improving sustainable fishing practices." Why is this footage important? The data collected from the cameras will be presented at CCAMLR's 10-day annual meeting in Hobart, Tasmania beginning Oct. 22.  With this data and examples of unique marine life like the sea cucumber in hand, Australia’s CCAMLR Commissioner, Gillian Slocum, said Australia will be seeking support for the creation of a new East Antarctic Marine Protected Area at the meeting, as well as supporting two other new Marine Protected Areas in the Southern Ocean. "The Southern Ocean is home to an incredible abundance and variety of marine life, including commercially sought-after species, the harvesting of which must be carefully managed for future generations," Slocum added. At least some humans have got your bright pink back, little sea cucumbers. WATCH: There’s an underwater pokéball that helps us study delicate sea creatures without harming them


Eye disorder may have helped Da Vinci's art: journal

Eye disorder may have helped Da Vinci's art: journal A common eye disorder may help explain Leonardo Da Vinci's talent for three-dimensional representation and the sense of perspective in his mountain landscapes, according to research published in an academic journal. People with strabismus often have monocular instead of binocular vision, meaning that both eyes are used separately thereby increasing the field of view and depth perception. "The presence of exotropia, particularly if it was intermittent, may have contributed to da Vinci's exceptional ability to capture space on the flat canvas," according to the research published in the JAMA Opthalmology journal this month.


Angry Diners Confront Sen. Mitch McConnell at Kentucky Restaurant

Angry Diners Confront Sen. Mitch McConnell at Kentucky Restaurant "Why don't you get out of here?" a man yelled at McConnell


Nebraska Public School Cook Fired After Serving Kangaroo Meat to Students

Nebraska Public School Cook Fired After Serving Kangaroo Meat to Students “If a family wants to eat exotic foods, they can do so on their own time – not at school”


AstraZeneca's Lynparza shown to put brakes on ovarian cancer

AstraZeneca's Lynparza shown to put brakes on ovarian cancer An AstraZeneca drug that blocks a cancer cell's ability to repair its genetic code greatly reduced the risk of ovarian cancer worsening in a phase III trial, underpinning its lead against two U.S. rivals in the same class. Given as a maintenance therapy to reinforce initial chemotherapy, Lynparza halted or reversed tumor growth in 60 percent of patients three years into the trial. At year four, the progression-free survival (PFS) rate in the Lynparza group was still above 50 percent, against 11 percent for chemotherapy alone.


Two rhinos die in Chad after being relocated from S.Africa

Two rhinos die in Chad after being relocated from S.Africa Two of six critically endangered black rhinos have died of unknown causes five months after being flown from South Africa to Chad in a pioneering project to re-introduce the animals, officials said Sunday. Rhinos in Chad were wiped out by poaching nearly 50 years ago, and the six rhinos were intended to establish a new population in the country after intensive anti-poaching measures were put in place to protect them. "We can confirm that these two rhinos (a male and a female) were not poached," the South African environment department and Chad government said in a joint statement.