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How to secure your privacy in the new age of technology

How to secure your privacy in the new age of technology Kurt 'The Cyber Guy' Knutsson offers tips on how to manage your settings on your Amazon home devices.


Enjoy technology without jeopardizing safety, security

Enjoy technology without jeopardizing safety, security Kurt the 'CyberGuy' provides insight.


A Norwegian Airline Claims to Have Set a New Record for New York to London Flights

A Norwegian Airline Claims to Have Set a New Record for New York to London Flights Norwegian Airlines flight DY7014 beat the previous subsonic record by three minutes


India's Ballistic Missile Test Is a 'Direct Threat,' a Chinese State-Owned Newspaper Says

India's Ballistic Missile Test Is a 'Direct Threat,' a Chinese State-Owned Newspaper Says India's Agni 5 missile test traveled for 19 minutes and 3,000 miles, putting China's eastern coastal cities in range


Watch the World's First Ever Drone Surf Rescue

Watch the World's First Ever Drone Surf Rescue A drone deployed an emergency flotation device to save two struggling swimmers in Australia


This Ex-Convict and Former Coal Boss is Running for Senate

This Ex-Convict and Former Coal Boss is Running for Senate Don Blankenship went to prison last year over the deadliest U.S. mine disaster in four decades


Supreme Court Delays Order for North Carolina to Redraw Map in Gerrymander Case

Supreme Court Delays Order for North Carolina to Redraw Map in Gerrymander Case A lower court had said Republicans would need to redraw the state's Congressional districts by next week


Phoenix Serial Killer Suspect Identified After DNA Allegedly Connects Him to 9 Killings

Phoenix Serial Killer Suspect Identified After DNA Allegedly Connects Him to 9 Killings Seven men and two women were shot between Nov. 27 and Dec. 17


Governors Ask Trump and Congress to Do More for Fight Against Opioids

Governors Ask Trump and Congress to Do More for Fight Against Opioids Trump declared the opioid crisis a public health emergency in October


Correction: Science Says-Meteor story

Correction: Science Says-Meteor story Correction: Science Says-Meteor story


Special Operations dogs get tactical gear upgrade

Special Operations dogs get tactical gear upgrade Fox Firepower: Allison Barrie with a look at how U.S. Army SOCOM is looking to equip the 75th Ranger Regiment's dogs with advanced vest protection, wearable sensors and video cameras.


Last three years hottest on record: UN

Last three years hottest on record: UN The last three years were the hottest on record, the United Nations weather agency said Thursday, citing fresh global data underscoring the dramatic warming of the planet. Consolidated data from five leading international weather agencies shows that "2015, 2016 and 2017 have been confirmed as the three warmest years on record", the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) said. It added that 2016 remains the hottest year ever measured, due to the warming effect of El Nino, while 2017 was the warmest non-El Nino year beating out 2015 by less than one hundredth of a degree.


'Depraved Conduct.' The Parents of 13 Malnourished Children Found in Captivity Could Face Life in Prison

'Depraved Conduct.' The Parents of 13 Malnourished Children Found in Captivity Could Face Life in Prison David and Louise Turpin were charged with committing years of torture and abuse


Researchers recreate 200-year-old man’s genome using only DNA from his living relatives

Researchers recreate 200-year-old man’s genome using only DNA from his living relatives

Hans Jonatan was born in St. Croix more than 200 years ago in 1784. His mother Emilia Regina was a house slave on the island, which means Jonatan was born into slavery.  He would later manage to free himself by escaping to Iceland, where he would marry a local woman and raise a family before dying in 1827 at the age of 43.

There are no known photographs of Jonatan, but he gained notoriety when his life story was told in a book called  The Man Who Stole Himself . But Jonatan once again finds himself the subject of much conversation this week. Despite having no access to any of the man's remains, researchers were able to recreate his DNA in a scientific breakthrough that could have tremendous implications.

There are no known remains of Hans Jonatan, who died nearly 200 years ago. But a team of researchers were able to partially reconstruct Jonatan's genome using nothing but DNA from his descendants. In other words, scientists were able to reproduce a man's DNA without access to a sample, and without ever having observed any of the man's genetic material.

A paper published in the journal Nature Genetics explains the researchers' feat. Using fragments of DNA taken from more than 180 of Jonatan's descendants, the scientists were able to recreate Jonatan's own DNA. This is the first time a procedure like this has been successful, and researchers believe it could have far-reaching implications.

"A genome is a mosaic of chromosome fragments from ancestors who existed some arbitrary number of generations earlier. Here, we reconstruct the genome of Hans Jonatan (HJ), born in the Caribbean in 1784 to an enslaved African mother and European father," the researchers explained in their abstract. "HJ migrated to Iceland in 1802, married and had two children. We genotyped 182 of his 788 descendants using single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) chips and whole-genome sequenced (WGS) 20 of them. Using these data, we reconstructed 38% of HJ’s maternal genome and inferred that his mother was from the region spanned by Benin, Nigeria and Cameroon."

Now, it's important to note that while the procedure was undoubtedly a breakthrough, we shouldn't expect to see recreations of historical figures' DNA flooding labs around the world anytime soon. The team responsible for partially recreating Jonatan's DNA says that he was the perfect subject of such a procedure because he was the only person of African descent in Iceland at the time.

Because of the country's homogeneity, scientists were able to distinguish known symbols of African DNA from Icelandic DNA in his descendants' samples. According to the researchers, no African ancestry apart from Jonatan existed in Iceland until around 1920. This made the task at hand much easier, since Jonatan was the only person in all of Iceland who was not of European descent.


Sudden Death of 200,000 Saiga Antelopes Tied to Horrifying Killer Bacteria That Scientists Can't Explain

Sudden Death of 200,000 Saiga Antelopes Tied to Horrifying Killer Bacteria That Scientists Can't Explain Scientists finally have an answer to what suddenly killed hundreds of thousands of antelope in 2015: a normally harmless bacteria made deadly by climate change. Three years ago, entire herds of saiga antelope dropped dead for no apparent reason. By studying the dead, researchers identified the killer: a bacteria called Pasteurella multocida type B.


Explorers in Mexico Discover World's Largest Underwater Cave and It's Filled With Ancient Mayan Treasures

Explorers in Mexico Discover World's Largest Underwater Cave and It's Filled With Ancient Mayan Treasures Divers in Mexico have discovered the largest known underwater, flooded cave in the world. The discovery could reveal more about the pre-Hispanic, ancient community that existed in the region. The Yucatan peninsula, where the cave is located, still holds treasures from the ancient Mayan community.


Pope Francis Performs First Airborne Papal Wedding During Flight in Chile

Pope Francis Performs First Airborne Papal Wedding During Flight in Chile He married two flight attendants from Chile


China says air quality 'improved' in 2017

China says air quality 'improved' in 2017 China's air quality improved across the country in 2017, the environmental protection ministry said Thursday, after the problem was so dire in previous years that some periods were dubbed an "airpocalypse". The average level of PM2.5 particles -- which penetrate deep into the lungs -- in 338 cities stood at 43 micrograms per cubic metre last year, falling 6.5 percent year-on-year, according to a ministry statement. The World Health Organization recommends a maximum average exposure of 25 micrograms per cubic metre in a 24-hour period.


Need a Job? Why Artificial Intelligence Will Help Human Workers, Not Hurt Them

Need a Job? Why Artificial Intelligence Will Help Human Workers, Not Hurt Them In 2013, James “Jimi” Crawford founded a company called Orbital Insight, barely noticed at the time amid the Silicon Valley froth. Crawford had worked at NASA for 15 years and wrote software for Mars rovers. Crawford saw an opportunity to collect and analyze what he anticipated would be a deluge of images from a surfeit of new satellites that would circle the Earth, taking readings and pictures.


Haitians Are No Longer Eligible for Temporary Work Visas in the U.S.

Haitians Are No Longer Eligible for Temporary Work Visas in the U.S. Belize and Samoa were also dropped from the list


President Trump Denies Changing His Mind About the Border Wall

President Trump Denies Changing His Mind About the Border Wall He's pushing back against his own chief of staff


‘Potentially hazardous’ asteroid wider than world’s tallest building is hurtling towards Earth

‘Potentially hazardous’ asteroid wider than world’s tallest building is hurtling towards Earth It could plunge Earth into a mini ice age


Hawaii’s False Alarm Exposes U.S. Civil Defense Gaps

Hawaii’s False Alarm Exposes U.S. Civil Defense Gaps Hawaii's false missile alarm brought home the perilous state of affairs between the U.S., its allies and North Korea amid rising tensions.


China spots four oil slicks from sunken tanker

China spots four oil slicks from sunken tanker The spill from a sunken Iranian tanker off China's east coast has spawned four oil slicks as authorities prepared to send robots to the wreckage to assess the environmental damage. The Sanchi, which was carrying 136,000 tonnes of light crude oil from Iran, sank in a ball of flames in the East China Sea on Sunday, a week after colliding with Hong Kong-registered bulk freighter the CF Crystal. The State Oceanic Administration of China said late Wednesday that it was monitoring four slicks with a total area of almost 101 square kilometres (39 square miles), roughly the same size as Paris.


A Killer Got Caught Because She Posted a Selfie That Showed an Incriminating Clue

A Killer Got Caught Because She Posted a Selfie That Showed an Incriminating Clue The image showed her wearing a belt used to strangle the victim


If You Get The Asian Glow, Alcohol Could Be Way Worse For Your Body

If You Get The Asian Glow, Alcohol Could Be Way Worse For Your Body If you get the “Asian glow,” you may want to reconsider your next margarita.


'I Feel Horrible.' Former University of Alabama Student Apologies After Using Racial Slur in Video

'I Feel Horrible.' Former University of Alabama Student Apologies After Using Racial Slur in Video She was also kicked out of the Alpha Phi sorority


Motion-activated cameras capture animals being wild, weird

Motion-activated cameras capture animals being wild, weird CHEYENNE, Wyo. (AP) — How does a bighorn sheep say "cheese?"


‘Close the Deal.’ Congress Wants President Trump to Be Decisive on Immigration

‘Close the Deal.’ Congress Wants President Trump to Be Decisive on Immigration "He's not yet indicated what measure he’s willing to sign"


You Can’t Use Google’s New Selfie Art App in These States

You Can’t Use Google’s New Selfie Art App in These States The app has gone viral


Former High School Classmate Charged With Murder of UPenn Student

Former High School Classmate Charged With Murder of UPenn Student Blaze Bernstein was found buried in a park


Commentary: These Next-Generation Supercomputers Are So Hot They Need to Run in a Freezer

Commentary: These Next-Generation Supercomputers Are So Hot They Need to Run in a Freezer Commentary: These Next-Generation Supercomputers Are So Hot They Need to Run in a Freezer


Chris Christie Didn't Break a Leg While Governor of New Jersey. Here's Why That's a Big Deal

Chris Christie Didn't Break a Leg While Governor of New Jersey. Here's Why That's a Big Deal Republican Chris Christie left the New Jersey governor's office with his popularity in tatters, but at least he didn't break a leg


Scientists may finally know what caused the mysterious epidemic that killed millions of Aztecs

Scientists may finally know what caused the mysterious epidemic that killed millions of Aztecs

In the 16th century, an epidemic wiped out approximately 80% of the Aztec population in when Central and South America. The horrific epidemic known as "cocoliztli" was responsible for killing millions of people in Mexico, Guatemala, and even as far as Peru. Those infected would experience severe vomiting and even bleeding, and the death rate was believed to be among the highest in history. Despite the massive scale of this demographic catastrophe, the cause of the epidemic has remained a mystery for all these years.

Now, nearly 500 years later, scientists may have made a breakthrough discovery that finally reveals the pathogen responsible for the devastating epidemic.

A team of scientists believe they have solved the cocoliztli mystery that has puzzled mankind for centuries. The team analyzed skeletal remains in a mass grave filled with victims of the cocoliztli epidemic, and their findings have apparently confirmed what some experts have suspected for years: The cocoliztli epidemic that killed millions of Aztecs was seemingly caused by Salmonella.

The team of researchers from the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Harvard University, and the Mexican National Institute of Anthropology and History say they found traces of Salmonella enterica Paratyphi C in ancient DNA extracted from the mass grave. Remains of the Salmonella strain were said to be present in a number of skeletons from the site, samples of which were recovered during a dig and returned to labs for analysis.

The researchers' paper was published this week in the journal Nature Ecology and Evolution.

"Indigenous populations of the Americas experienced high mortality rates during the early contact period as a result of infectious diseases, many of which were introduced by Europeans," the researchers wrote. "Most of the pathogenic agents that caused these outbreaks remain unknown. Through the introduction of a new metagenomic analysis tool called MALT, applied here to search for traces of ancient pathogen DNA, we were able to identify Salmonella enterica in individuals buried in an early contact era epidemic cemetery at Teposcolula-Yucundaa, Oaxaca in southern Mexico."

They continued, "This cemetery is linked, based on historical and archaeological evidence, to the 1545–1550 CE epidemic that affected large parts of Mexico. Locally, this epidemic was known as ‘cocoliztli’, the pathogenic cause of which has been debated for more than a century. Here, we present genome-wide data from ten individuals for Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Paratyphi C, a bacterial cause of enteric fever. We propose that S. Paratyphi C be considered a strong candidate for the epidemic population decline during the 1545 cocoliztli outbreak at Teposcolula-Yucundaa."

According to the scientists, this is the first direct evidence of a potential cause of the epidemic.


Why Did Two-Thirds of These Weird Antelope Suddenly Drop Dead?

Why Did Two-Thirds of These Weird Antelope Suddenly Drop Dead? It took just three weeks for two-thirds of all the world’s saiga to die. It took much longer to work out why. The saiga is an endearing antelope, whose bulbous nose gives it the comedic air of a Dr. Seuss character. It typically wanders over large tracts of Central Asian grassland, but every spring, tens of thousands of them gather in the same place to give birth. These calving aggregations should be joyous events, but the gathering in May 2015 became something far more sinister when 200,000 saiga just dropped dead. They did so without warning, over a matter of days, in gathering sites spread across 65,000 square miles—an area the size of Florida. Whatever killed them was thorough and merciless: Across a vast area, every last saiga perished.


'This Is Reprehensible.' Read Jeff Flake's Speech Comparing Trump's Attacks on the Media to Josef Stalin

'This Is Reprehensible.' Read Jeff Flake's Speech Comparing Trump's Attacks on the Media to Josef Stalin "If we compromise the truth for the sake of our politics, we are lost"


Here's Why the Flu Is Especially Bad This Year

Here's Why the Flu Is Especially Bad This Year Every part of the continental U.S. is showing "widespread" flu activity


L.L. Bean rebuffs boycott over granddaughter’s big Trump donation

L.L. Bean rebuffs boycott over granddaughter’s big Trump donation A man wipes off the headlights of the L.L. Bean Bootmobile in the parking lot at the facility where the famous outdoor boot is made. L.L. Bean is pushing back against a boycott led by a group urging consumers not to shop at retailers that support President-elect Donald Trump after it was revealed that Linda Bean, heir of the Maine-based company’s founder, had donated to a political action committee that helped elect Trump. “We are deeply troubled by the portrayal of L.L. Bean as a supporter of any political agenda,” Shawn Gorman, L.L. Bean’s executive chairman, said in a statement posted to Facebook late Sunday.


Union leader who says Trump lied about Carrier deal refuses to back down

Union leader who says Trump lied about Carrier deal refuses to back down Trump tours a Carrier factory in Indianapolis, Dec. 1, 2016. Chuck Jones, the union leader who claims President-elect Donald Trump lied to Carrier employees while touting a deal to keep jobs in the U.S., says he started receiving harassing phone calls a half hour after Trump slammed him on Twitter. “I’ve been doing this job for 30 years,” Jones, president of the United Steelworkers Local 1999, told CNN on Thursday morning.


Working, eating and sleeping at the office

Working, eating and sleeping at the office The sight of workers sleeping on the job is common in China, where a surplus of cheap labor can lead to downtime and employees at startup companies work long hours.


Obama seeks ‘irreversible’ opening to Cuba

Obama seeks ‘irreversible’ opening to Cuba This story is part of a weeklong Yahoo series marking one year since the opening of relations between the United States and Cuba.


The Last Days Of Streit's, New York's Jewish Willy Wonka Factory

Photographer Joseph O. Holmes photographs the last days of the 90-year-old Manhattan matzo factory. Located on Rivington Street on Manhattan's Lower East Side, Streit's Matzo Factory has been pumping out as much as 900 pounds of matzo an hour to feed New York's Jewish community for almost a century. After 90 years, though, Streit's is closing-up shop, shutting down its Manhattan factory and ...

Propeller kills factory worker

A 26-year-old factory worker was killed when he was hit by a propeller when the machine he was cleaning reportedly got switched on unintentionally.

Union might postpone vote seeking to organize Boeing's South Carolina plant

By Alwyn Scott NORTH CHARLESTON, South Carolina (Reuters) - Labor union officials say they could postpone a vote seeking to organize 3,000 workers at Boeing Co's factory here in South Carolina if their campaign fails to gain enough traction against fierce opposition from the company and local politicians. Organizers for the International Association of Machinists (IAM) are going door-to-door ...

Union might postpone vote seeking to organise Boeing's South Carolina plant

Labour union officials say they could postpone a vote seeking to organise 3,000 workers at Boeing Co's factory here in South Carolina if their campaign fails to gain enough traction against fierce opposition from the company and local politicians.     Organizers for the International Association of Machinists (IAM) are going door-to-door this week to gauge backing for the April 22 vote, and to ...

Film industry hopes Wednesday rally makes government ‘rethink’ tax credit cut

A film industry rep is expecting one of the biggest rallies in the province’s history Wednesday as talks between the industry and government on the film tax credit continue. Screen Nova Scotia chair, Marc Almon, and other industry members met … Continue Reading

Nova Scotia film industry hopeful about tax credit after meeting with government

Nova Scotia's film industry maintained pressure Tuesday on the provincial government over a change to its film tax credit, although the sides emerged from a meeting with different interpretations over a potential compromise. Key industry players expressed some optimism, describing a two-hour meeting with Finance Minister Diana Whalen and her officials as productive. Screen Nova Scotia chairman ...

Industry: Digital music sales match physical for 1st time

LONDON (AP) — Revenue from digital music matched that from physical albums and discs for the first time in 2014, a global industry body said Tuesday.

Fitch: Strong Results Expected for Hospital Industry in 1Q15

Continued strength in organic growth in volumes of patients experienced by the acute care hospital industry is likely to help maintain strong for-profit hospital earnings, according to Fitch Ratings.

Deinove: The Industrial Advantages of Deinove's Deinococcus Highlighted by the American Magazine Journal of Applied ...

MONTPELLIER, France -- DEINOVE (Alternext Paris: ALDEI), a biotech company developing innovative processes for producing biofuels and bio-based chemicals by using Deinococcus bacteria as host strains, ...