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The Latest: Fed sees no risk to dollar from cryptocurrencies

The Latest: Fed sees no risk to dollar from cryptocurrencies Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell is downplaying the possibility that digital currencies such as Facebook's planned "Libra" could supplant government-backed dollars any time soon. The Fed chair says that Facebook had met with regulators and government supervisors to offer a digital currency, including with officials from the U.S. central bank. Powell says the currencies offer both potential benefits and possible risks.


New York allowed driver's licenses for undocumented immigrants. Is New Jersey next?

New York allowed driver's licenses for undocumented immigrants. Is New Jersey next? After New York became the 13th state to offer driver’s licenses to undocumented immigrants, advocates are pushing for New Jersey to be next.


Fed stands pat on rates, signals it's prepared to cut if trade war intensifies

Fed stands pat on rates, signals it's prepared to cut if trade war intensifies The Fed kept its key interest rate at 2.25% to 2.5% but signaled it was prepared to cut rates if the US trade war with China deepens


Glaciers, goodbye? Himalayan ice melt has doubled in recent years, old spy images confirm

Glaciers, goodbye? Himalayan ice melt has doubled in recent years, old spy images confirm Picture 3 million swimming pools full of water. That's how much ice melts from glaciers in the Himalayas each year, and climate change is the primary cause.


This Just In: U.S. Steel Upgraded

This Just In: U.S. Steel Upgraded Vertical Group thinks U.S. Steel stock could heat up on a big production cut.


What Dave & Buster's Wants Investors to Know

What Dave & Buster's Wants Investors to Know The entertainment chain recently lowered its sales growth outlook for 2019.


Fed Scraps ‘Patient’ Rate Approach in Prelude to Potential Cut

Fed Scraps ‘Patient’ Rate Approach in Prelude to Potential Cut (Bloomberg) -- The Federal Reserve indicated a readiness to cut interest rates for the first time in more than a decade to sustain a near-record U.S. economic expansion, citing “uncertainties” in their outlook.While Chairman Jerome Powell and fellow policy makers left their key rate in a range of 2.25% to 2.5% on Wednesday, they dropped a reference in their statement to being “patient” on borrowing costs and forecast a larger miss of their 2% inflation target this year.Read More: Bloomberg’s TOPLive blog on the FOMC decisionU.S. stocks rose after the decision and Treasuries erased losses. Yields on 2-year Treasury yields dropped over 5 basis points to 1.81%, while benchmark 10-year rates broke below 2.05%. Fed funds futures priced in increased odds of a rate cut at the July meeting.The change in tone follows attacks on the Fed by President Donald Trump for not doing more to bolster the economy and Tuesday’s report by Bloomberg News that the president asked White House lawyers earlier this year to explore his options for demoting Powell from the chairmanship.In a press conference after the meeting, Powell said he thinks "the law is clear that I have a four-year term and I fully intend to serve it."The Fed still expects a strong labor market and inflation to be near its goal but “uncertainties about this outlook have increased,’’ the Federal Open Market Committee said in the statement following a two-day meeting in Washington. “In light of these uncertainties and muted inflation pressures, the Committee will closely monitor the implications of incoming information for the economic outlook and will act as appropriate to sustain the expansion.”The FOMC vote was not unanimous, with St. Louis Fed President James Bullard seeking a quarter-point rate cut. His vote marked the first dissent of Powell’s 16-month tenure as chairman.Policy makers were starkly divided on the path for policy. Eight of 17 penciled in a reduction by the end of the year as another eight saw no change and one forecast a hike, according to updated quarterly forecasts.In the statement, officials downgraded their assessment of economic activity to a “moderate” pace from “solid” at their last gathering.The pivot toward easier monetary policy shows the Fed swinging closer to the view of most investors that Trump’s trade war is slowing the economy’s momentum and that rates are too restrictive given sluggish inflation.Trump’s attacks on the Fed risk casting a political shadow over whatever policy decision the Fed makes, though Powell and his colleagues say they’re focusing only on the economic goals Congress gave them.Officials noted that “growth of household spending appears to have picked up from earlier in the year” and that indicators of business fixed investment “have been soft.” They repeated that the labor market “remains strong.”Investors have been betting the Fed will reduce rates at its next meeting in late July, though a majority of economists surveyed earlier this month don’t expect a move until December. Yields on 10-year Treasuries have fallen to the lowest since 2017. The hope of fresh stimulus has sent U.S. stocks to near a record.Recent U.S. economic data have been mixed. Consumer spending held up in May but job gains were disappointing, and some gauges of business sentiment have cooled on uncertainty around the outlook for trade. The Fed remains bedevilled by inflation continuing to undershoot the central bank’s 2% target despite unemployment being at a 49-year low.Central bankers are likely hoping for greater clarity over Trump’s trade war with China. Stocks jumped on Tuesday after the president said he would meet Chinese leader Xi Jinping at next week’s Group of 20 summit in Japan.The Fed, which raised interest rates four times last year and as recently as December projected further hikes in 2019, isn’t alone in changing tack. European Central Bank President Mario Draghi on Tuesday paved the way for a rate cut, and central banks in Australia, India and Russia have lowered borrowing costs this month.Get MoreThe median projection for 2019 GDP growth was unchanged at 2.1% and revised up by a tenth of a point to 2% in 2020. The 2021 estimate was held at 1.8%.The median unemployment rate forecasts 2019-21 were all lowered by a tenth of a point. Officials see 3.6% this year rising to 3.7% next year and 3.8% in 2021. Officials see the jobless rate most consistent with full employment in the long run at 4.2%, versus 4.3% in March.Officials cut estimates for their preferred inflation gauge. The personal consumption expenditures price index is expected to increase just 1.5% in 2019, down from a 1.8% projection in March. By 2020, the main and core gauges are both projected to rise 1.9%, below the target.(Updates with Powell quote on serving his term in fifth paragraph.)\--With assistance from Chris Middleton, Alex Tanzi and Ben Holland.To contact the reporter on this story: Craig Torres in Washington at ctorres3@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Alister Bull at abull7@bloomberg.net, ;Margaret Collins at mcollins45@bloomberg.net, Scott Lanman, Jeff KearnsFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


Few heart patients use cardiac rehab after stenting

Few heart patients use cardiac rehab after stenting Despite benefits from rehabilitation such as better quality of life and lower rates of rehospitalization, patients may not attend these sessions because of issues related to insurance, costs and access to a rehab facility, the study authors report in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. Efforts to get doctors to increase their referrals of patients for cardiac rehab have worked, the authors write, but more needs to be done to make sure patients attend the sessions. "Unfortunately, the use of cardiac rehabilitation among eligible patients remains low," he told Reuters Health by email.


Fed leaves its key rate unchanged but hints of future cuts

Fed leaves its key rate unchanged but hints of future cuts The Federal Reserve left its key interest rate unchanged Wednesday but signaled that it's prepared to start cutting rates if needed to protect the U.S. economy from trade conflicts and other threats. The Fed kept its benchmark rate — which influences many consumer and business loans — in a range of 2.25% to 2.5%, where it's been since December. It issued a statement saying that because "uncertainties" have increased, it would "act as appropriate to sustain the expansion." That language echoed a remark Chairman Jerome Powell made two weeks ago that analysts interpreted as a signal that rate cuts were on the way.


Bonds Rally, Dollar Weakens After Fed Turns Dovish: Markets Wrap

Bonds Rally, Dollar Weakens After Fed Turns Dovish: Markets Wrap (Bloomberg) -- Want the lowdown on European markets? In your inbox before the open, every day. Sign up here.U.S. stocks traded close to record highs and Treasuries rallied, while the dollar weakened by the most since March after the Federal Reserve struck a dovish tone in its latest policy statement.The S&P 500 pushed within striking distance of an all-time high before paring gains. The two-year note yield slipped to as low as 1.77% after the central bank kept rates steady and signaled a readiness to cut interest rates for the first time in more than a decade. Moves were somewhat muted after markets had been pricing in such a turn for the past few weeks. Crude oil fluctuated. “We’re definitely hearing a decidedly more dovish Fed,” said Mike Loewengart, vice president of investment strategy at E*TRADE Financial. “While you could point the finger at pressure from the White House, it’s key to remember that the Fed’s focus has always been on two things and two things only: Jobs and inflation.” Chairman Jerome Powell and colleagues dropped a reference in their statement to being “patient” on borrowing costs and forecast a larger miss of their 2% inflation target this year. Policy makers kept their key rate in a range of 2.25% to 2.5%.As many of the world’s biggest central banks signal a shift to easier policy, traders are weighing that against trade war fears and signs of cooling global growth. U.S. President Donald Trump said Tuesday that he had a “very good” phone conversation with Chinese President Xi Jinping. The two leaders will hold an “extended meeting” at the G-20 summit on June 28-29 in Osaka.“Members of the Fed handed the markets what they were looking for by now predicting rate cuts,” said Bryce Doty, senior vice president at Sit Investment Associates. “I can’t help feeling that many will see that a precedent has been set: Higher trade tariffs bring rate cuts.”These are the main moves in markets: StocksThe S&P 500 Index rose 0.2% as of 2:48 p.m. New York time, while the Nasdaq Composite Index gained 0.1% and the Dow Jones Industrial Average increased less than 0.2%.The Stoxx Europe 600 was little changed.The MSCI Emerging Market Index climbed 1.6%, the biggest increase in more than a week.The MSCI Asia Pacific Index surged 2%, the highest in six weeks on the largest jump in more than five months. CurrenciesThe Bloomberg Dollar Spot Index declined as much as 0.4%, the most on an intraday basis since March 20.The euro rose 0.2% to $1.1206, while the yen weakened less than 0.1% at 108.35 per dollar.The British pound rose 0.6% to $1.2632, the biggest rise in more than a week.The MSCI Emerging Markets Currency Index rose 0.5%.BondsThe yield on 10-year Treasuries fell 2 basis points to 2.04%.Germany’s 10-year yield climbed 3 basis points to -0.29%. CommoditiesWest Texas Intermediate fell 0.6% to $53.57 a barrel.Gold rose 0.3% to $1,350 an ounce.The Bloomberg Commodity Index dropped 0.5%.To contact the reporters on this story: Sarah Ponczek in New York at sponczek2@bloomberg.net;Vildana Hajric in New York at vhajric1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Jeremy Herron at jherron8@bloomberg.net, Dave LiedtkaFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


Northeast Congo insecurity hampers response to measles outbreak

Northeast Congo insecurity hampers response to measles outbreak Insecurity in northeast Congo has hampered a measles vaccination drive and forced people to flee their homes, local responders said on Wednesday, complicating efforts to control the spread of a virus that has killed more people that Ebola this year. At least 1,500 people have died from measles in Democratic Republic of Congo since the start of 2019, according to health authorities, compared with 1,390 felled by an Ebola epidemic in the east. Ethnic violence between Lendu farmers and Hema livestock herders in the northeastern province of Ituri has forced thousands to seek sanctuary in refugee camps in the regional capital of Bunia.


Trump’s picks for administration jobs keep dropping out

Trump’s picks for administration jobs keep dropping out More than five dozen of President Trump's nominees withdrew or saw their nominations pulled before they were put through the confirmation process.


Some BlockchainK2 (CVE:BITK) Shareholders Have Taken A Painful 92% Share Price Drop

Some BlockchainK2 (CVE:BITK) Shareholders Have Taken A Painful 92% Share Price Drop Long term investing is the way to go, but that doesn't mean you should hold every stock forever. It hits us in the gut...


Canada opens probe into 250,000 GM pickups, SUVs over brake performance

Canada opens probe into 250,000 GM pickups, SUVs over brake performance The U.S. National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) in November into 2.73 million U.S. 2014-2016 model year SUVs and pickups after receiving 487 reports of hard brake pedal effort accompanied by extended stopping distance that were attributed to deterioration of the engine-driven brake assist vacuum pump.


Canada opens probe into 250,000 GM pickups, SUVs over brake performance

Canada opens probe into 250,000 GM pickups, SUVs over brake performance The U.S. National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) in November into 2.73 million U.S. 2014-2016 model year SUVs and pickups after receiving 487 reports of hard brake pedal effort accompanied by extended stopping distance that were attributed to deterioration of the engine-driven brake assist vacuum pump.


T-Mobile and Sprint Might Clear Major Merger Hurdle, Still Face Another

T-Mobile and Sprint Might Clear Major Merger Hurdle, Still Face Another There's still a lawsuit to deal with.


If You Had Bought Troy Energy (CVE:TEG.H) Stock Three Years Ago, You Could Pocket A 200% Gain Today

If You Had Bought Troy Energy (CVE:TEG.H) Stock Three Years Ago, You Could Pocket A 200% Gain Today It hasn't been the best quarter for Troy Energy Corp. (CVE:TEG.H) shareholders, since the share price has fallen 25...


GLOBAL MARKETS-Stocks gain, yields lower after Fed signals possible rate cuts

GLOBAL MARKETS-Stocks gain, yields lower after Fed signals possible rate cuts A gauge of global stock markets added to gains on Wednesday and benchmark U.S. Treasury yields and the U.S. dollar fell after the U.S. Federal Reserve signaled possible rate cuts of as much as half a percentage point over the remainder of this year. The U.S. central bank held interest rates steady and said it "will act as appropriate to sustain" the economic expansion as it approaches the 10-year mark and dropped a promise to be "patient" in adjusting rates. The market expects the Fed could cut rates as soon as next month.


What Should You Know About The Future Of BJ's Wholesale Club Holdings, Inc.'s (NYSE:BJ)?

What Should You Know About The Future Of BJ's Wholesale Club Holdings, Inc.'s (NYSE:BJ)? After BJ's Wholesale Club Holdings, Inc.'s (NYSE:BJ) earnings announcement on 04 May 2019, analyst consensus outlook...


Mom who died in Michigan river with 2 girls was 'tired, sad'

Mom who died in Michigan river with 2 girls was 'tired, sad' A Michigan woman who drove her car into a river, killing herself and twin daughters, had been talking about being "sad and lonely," a family member said. The bodies of Ineza McClinton, 44, and 9-year-old twins Angel and Faith McClinton were recovered Monday and Tuesday from the Kalamazoo River. McClinton was "having some difficulties in her life," another daughter, Tishyron McClinton, told TV station WWMT .


Northeast Congo insecurity hampers response to measles outbreak

Northeast Congo insecurity hampers response to measles outbreak Insecurity in northeast Congo has hampered a measles vaccination drive and forced people to flee their homes, local responders said on Wednesday, complicating efforts to control the spread of a virus that has killed more people that Ebola this year. At least 1,500 people have died from measles in Democratic Republic of Congo since the start of 2019, according to health authorities, compared with 1,390 felled by an Ebola epidemic in the east. Ethnic violence between Lendu farmers and Hema livestock herders in the northeastern province of Ituri has forced thousands to seek sanctuary in refugee camps in the regional capital of Bunia.


Coal comeback? Trump plan breathes new life into aging power plants, but critics say climate will suffer

Coal comeback? Trump plan breathes new life into aging power plants, but critics say climate will suffer The Trump administration announced it is replacing Obama's Clean Power plan to combat climate change with one that boosts coal use.


Lower Interest Rates Coming? Here's What It Means for You

Lower Interest Rates Coming? Here's What It Means for You Get ready. The Federal Reserve wants to start cutting rates.


Does Sensient Technologies Corporation's (NYSE:SXT) 33% Earnings Growth Reflect The Long-Term Trend?

Does Sensient Technologies Corporation's (NYSE:SXT) 33% Earnings Growth Reflect The Long-Term Trend? After looking at Sensient Technologies Corporation's (NYSE:SXT) latest earnings announcement (31 March 2019), I found...


Pot, guns, sports betting on agenda for lawmakers' last day

Pot, guns, sports betting on agenda for lawmakers' last day Maine lawmakers are hoping to finish up work on marijuana sales, renewable energy and online sports betting during the last scheduled day of this session Wednesday. Lawmakers say they are prepared to work into the night to get it all done.


Gymnastics-USA Gymnastics updates Safe Sport Policy

Gymnastics-USA Gymnastics updates Safe Sport Policy After being rocked by a sexual abuse scandal, USA Gymnastics on Wednesday released an updated Safe Sport Policy designed to provide clearer guidelines to protect those involved in the sport. The policy, posted on its website, lists seven categories of reportable misconduct: sexual, emotional, physical misconduct, stalking, bullying behaviour, hazing, and harassment. It links to a page where misconduct can be reported online.


The BIO-key International (NASDAQ:BKYI) Share Price Is Down 79% So Some Shareholders Are Rather Upset

The BIO-key International (NASDAQ:BKYI) Share Price Is Down 79% So Some Shareholders Are Rather Upset This week we saw the BIO-key International, Inc. (NASDAQ:BKYI) share price climb by 15%. But will that heal all the...


No Rate Cut Yet -- Here’s What Investors Need to Know About the June Fed Meeting

No Rate Cut Yet -- Here’s What Investors Need to Know About the June Fed Meeting The Fed didn’t cut interest rates, but there’s a lot more to the story.


What Does SunCoke Energy, Inc.'s (NYSE:SXC) Balance Sheet Tell Us About It?

What Does SunCoke Energy, Inc.'s (NYSE:SXC) Balance Sheet Tell Us About It? Investors are always looking for growth in small-cap stocks like SunCoke Energy, Inc. (NYSE:SXC), with a market cap of...


Sierra Leone president opens bids for 7 km airport bridge

Sierra Leone president opens bids for 7 km airport bridge Sierra Leone's president opened a tender process on Wednesday for building a 7 km bridge at a cost of up to $2 billion to link Freetown to the country's only international airport. Freetown International Airport at Lungi is currently accessible only by boat or helicopter, separated from the capital by the nearly five km (three mile) wide mouth of the Rokel river. "I will closely superintend the entire process and ensure that every tender is compliant and every tender is in the best long-term interest of Sierra Leone," President Julius Maada Bio said in a Wednesday speech at State House.


Police: Attorney's wife killed spouse, burned his body

Police: Attorney's wife killed spouse, burned his body Police say the wife of an Atlanta attorney shot him and then burned his remains in a wooded area on their property. News outlets report 59-year-old Melody Farris was arrested in Tennessee on Tuesday and charged with malice murder, aggravated assault and concealing a body. Farris' son found the remains in July 2018 in Cherokee County but the badly charred remains were difficult to identify.


Text of the Fed's statement after its meeting Wednesday

Text of the Fed's statement after its meeting Wednesday Information received since the Federal Open Market Committee met in May indicates that the labor market remains strong and that economic activity is rising at a moderate rate. Job gains have been solid, on average, in recent months, and the unemployment rate has remained low. Consistent with its statutory mandate, the Committee seeks to foster maximum employment and price stability.


2 arrested in gun death of 5-year-old boy in Wisconsin

2 arrested in gun death of 5-year-old boy in Wisconsin Police in Wisconsin say two men who dropped off a 5-year-old boy at a hospital with a fatal gunshot wound have been arrested. The child, Dakari Weldon, was shot Monday at a home in Kenosha and taken to Froedtert South Hospital. The child's grandfather, Curtis Cannon, told WISN-TV that the men who left Dakari at the hospital were his adult sons.


Tennis-Kristyna beats Karolina in battle of Pliskova twins

Tennis-Kristyna beats Karolina in battle of Pliskova twins Kristyna Pliskova pulled off the biggest win of her career but it was bad news for twin sister Karolina who was on the receiving end of a 6-2 3-6 7-6(7) defeat at the Birmingham grasscourt event on Wednesday. The world number 112 fired down 24 aces as she beat world number three Karolina in their first meeting in a WTA event. It was her first win against a top-five ranked player and she will go on to play fellow Czech Barbora Strycova in the quarter-finals.


Two Painful Truths of America’s Religious Culture War

Two Painful Truths of America’s Religious Culture War The fundamental, founding structure of our American nation is relatively simple. While the federal government should seek the common good, its first responsibility is to secure the liberty of its citizens. Conversely, while citizens should seek to influence their nation through government, their first responsibility is to exercise their liberty toward virtuous ends. This is the essence of the ordered liberty envisioned by the Founders. Government protects our “unalienable rights,” yet at the same time our Constitution is made for a “moral and religious people” and is “wholly inadequate to the government of any other.”Failure on either end — failure of the government to protect liberty or failure of the people to be virtuous — breaks the compact and places unacceptable strains on our nation and culture. As Christian communities face increasing governmental hostility and struggle with declining church attendance, it’s time for both sides of our nation’s religious culture war to confront their role in disrupting these core principles of the American founding. Here are two painful truths: Secular government is breaking its promise of liberty, and the American church is breaking its promise of virtue.First, the mainly progressive effort to restrict the free exercise of religion is plainly illiberal and contrary to the constitutional order. If there is one single legal strand that ties together the myriad threats to religious liberty and free speech in the United States — efforts to coerce Catholic hospitals and adoption agencies into violating their convictions, to toss Christian student groups off campuses, to force Christian institutions to facilitate access to abortifacients, to compel the speech of Christian creative professionals, or to place in doubt the accreditation and tax exemptions of Christian educational institutions — it’s that they depend for their success on inverting the proper constitutional order.Progressive government passes sweeping and intrusive statutes and regulations and then treats the free-exercise and free-speech claims of religious individuals and institutions as a form of special pleading. Yet this gets the legal hierarchy upside down. The Constitution — including the First Amendment, of course — is the supreme law of the land, and statutes and regulations are making claims against it. Thus, the default proposition is that free speech, free exercise, and voluntary association enjoy protection, with that protection to fall away only in the face of compelling governmental interests, enacted through the least restrictive means.Efforts to chip away at this default structure aim to disrupt the primacy of liberty and the legal primacy of the Constitution. So, when people of faith decry attacks on religious freedom, they’re not merely an interest group seeking accommodation; they’re citizens seeking to maintain the core principles of the American founding.This brings us to the second truth. Even while religious conservatives are right to fight for their liberties, we need to understand that no government or cultural institution is more responsible for the decline of the church than the church itself. All too many Christians look at falling Sunday-morning attendance and increasing faithlessness and lash out — at Hollywood, at academia, or at (to take a recent example) “drag-queen story hour.”Instead, we should be more focused on lashing in — at hypocrisy, at adultery, at abuse, and all the sins besetting our nation’s congregations. Drag-queen story hours could populate our libraries from coast to coast and they would do far less damage to American Christianity than the continued proliferation of the Catholic/Protestant abuse crisis.Not one Christian parent has to take his or her child to see a drag queen at the library, but all too many Christian parents have had to explain the moral collapse of pastors and church leaders to their kids. All too many Christian wives have had to deal with the devastation of a husband addicted to porn, and all too many Christian spouses have had to pick up the pieces after infidelity and divorce.Even worse, we often do the opposite of the thing that Paul commanded — we are oh so understanding of our own failings while oh so intolerant of the world’s sins. First Corinthians 5, verses 9 through 12 are among the least-observed and most-defied verses in the Bible:> I wrote to you in my letter not to associate with sexually immoral people — not at all meaning the sexually immoral of this world, or the greedy and swindlers, or idolaters, since then you would need to go out of the world. But now I am writing to you not to associate with anyone who bears the name of brother if he is guilty of sexual immorality or greed, or is an idolater, reviler, drunkard, or swindler — not even to eat with such a one. For what have I to do with judging outsiders? Is it not those inside the church whom you are to judge?He wrote those words from within a depraved Roman culture — a world that was replete with temptations of the flesh. While he did not ignore the world’s sin, his disciplinary focus was inward, even as his evangelistic focus was outward.Wise members of the church are beginning to recognize this truth. Earlier this year, the Southern Baptist Convention’s Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission — no slouch in the defense of Christian freedom — decided to change the focus of its annual conference to examine the crisis of sex abuse in the church. My wife has publicly discussed her own experience of childhood sexual abuse at the hands of a youth pastor, and that dreadful event had more adverse impact on her faith than any secular academic class ever could.If we want the church to thrive, we should protect liberty, and that means progressive governments should be held accountable under law for their illiberal attacks on free exercise. But absent our own faithfulness, every legal or political victory will be for naught. We’ll continue to bleed members, lose our witness, and close our doors. Our true challenge lies not with the drag queens without but rather with the adulterers and abusers within.


Trans Mountain oil pipeline expansion may start in September

Trans Mountain oil pipeline expansion may start in September CALGARY, Alberta/WINNIPEG, Manitoba (Reuters) - Construction on expanding the Trans Mountain oil pipeline could begin in September, assuming the next regulatory steps go smoothly, the project's chief executive said on Wednesday. The C$7.4 billion ($5.56 billion) project was stalled a year ago after a Canadian court ruled the federal government, which also owns Trans Mountain, failed to adequately consult indigenous groups. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau on Tuesday reapproved the expansion, cheering the oil industry but angering environmental groups.


Can Trump Fire Fed Chair Jerome Powell? What History Tells Us

Can Trump Fire Fed Chair Jerome Powell? What History Tells Us Can Trump Fire Fed Chair Jerome Powell? What History Tells Us


France sends top diplomat to Iran for talks to reduce tensions

France sends top diplomat to Iran for talks to reduce tensions French President Emmanuel Macron's top diplomatic adviser travelled to Iran on Wednesday to hold talks with local officials as part of European efforts to reduce tensions in the Gulf region, a presidency official said. "The diplomatic adviser did indeed travel to Iran on June 19...to hold high-level talks with the objective of contributing to a de-escalation of tensions in the region," the official said, confirming information from two diplomatic sources. The diplomat, Emmanuel Bonne, has been based in Iran in the past and is a Middle East expert.


Man arrested for slapping reporter's hand at Trump's rally

Man arrested for slapping reporter's hand at Trump's rally Authorities in Florida say a man was arrested outside the arena where President Donald Trump made his reelection announcement for trying to slap a cellphone out of a journalist's hand. The Orlando Police Department said Wednesday that 51-year-old Daniel Kestner is facing a battery charge for trying to slap the phone out of the hand of Orlando Sentinel reporter Michael Williams. An arrest report says Williams was filming Kestner arguing with another man outside the Amway Center.


US stocks edge higher after Fed signals future rate cuts

US stocks edge higher after Fed signals future rate cuts U.S. stock indexes veered modestly higher Wednesday afternoon after the Federal Reserve reaffirmed that it is prepared to cut interest rates if needed to shield the economy from trade conflicts or other threats. As expected, the central bank's policymakers decided to leave the Fed's benchmark interest rate unchanged. Investors are betting on at least one interest rate cut this year, possibly as early as July.