This Website Maybe For Sale – Click Here -

ELECTRONICS Resource Center

Source Match Electronics News

Pound up but still faces pressure after Brexit delay deal

Pound up but still faces pressure after Brexit delay deal The pound rose Friday but was struggling to claw back its latest losses after the EU gave Britain a Brexit deadline extension, while equity markets mostly rose on a positive lead from Wall Street. At a summit in Brussels, Prime Minister Theresa May was given until April 12 to push her divorce agreement through a fractious parliament next week.


Venezuela arrests Guaido aide for 'terrorism' in defiance of US

Venezuela arrests Guaido aide for 'terrorism' in defiance of US Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro's regime defied the US on Thursday to arrest a top aide of opposition leader Juan Guaido, whom Washington recognizes as the crisis-hit country's interim leader. The United States has repeatedly warned Maduro's government against arresting Guaido or his close aides, saying it would face unspecified repercussions.


T-Mobile unveils home broadband service that could expand after Sprint merger

T-Mobile unveils home broadband service that could expand after Sprint merger T-Mobile on Thursday unveiled a limited home internet service that it plans to pilot for 50,000 mobile customers at $50 a month, with the company promising it could build on that, and eventually offer a lot more once its $26.5 billion merger with Sprint finally goes through.For now, the new invitation-only service will focus on areas where the carrier can deliver high-speed internet access to connect up to 50,000 homes in rural and underserved parts of the country. Once it merges with Sprint, however, T-Mobile says it should be able to cover more than half of the US with broadband service by 2024.This seems to be one attempt by T-Mobile to push back against critics of the proposed merger who worry it will leave customers with less choice and the potential for prices to rise. "We're walking the walk and laying the foundation for a world where we can take the fight to Big Cable on behalf of consumers and offer real choice, competition and savings to Americans nationwide," T-Mobile CEO John Legere about the home broadband pilot.The service will be offered only in areas where T-Mobile expects to deliver speeds of around 50 Mbps through fixed unlimited wireless service over LTE, with no data caps. The carrier points to one economist's estimate that showed while customers today pay around $80 a month for wired in-home broadband service, "the new T-Mobile will save customers up to $13.65 billion a year on home broadband by 2024".As context for why it decided to pursue the new service, T-Mobile went on to note in its announcement that almost half of Americans today have no competitive choice for high-speed in-home broadband. "The New T-Mobile," the company declares, "will be armed with spectrum and network assets that will build the highest capacity wireless network in US history, covering millions with 5G, not just a few people in a few blocks of a few cities like the other guys."If you're eligible to participate in the home broadband pilot, T-Mobile plans to start sending out invitations by email and regular mail this week.We mentioned T-Mobile's pending merger with Sprint, and it's also worth pointing out, as a reminder, that it's still under review by federal regulators. T-Mobile has said it feels optimistic everything will be approved in the first half of this year.


Missouri governor declares state of emergency amid rising floodwaters in Midwestern U.S.

Missouri governor declares state of emergency amid rising floodwaters in Midwestern U.S. Flooding triggered by last week's so-called "bomb cyclone" storm has already inflicted damage estimated at nearly $1.5 billion in Nebraska, killed at least four people in Nebraska and Iowa and left a man missing below Nebraska's collapsed Spencer Dam. "The rising floodwaters are affecting more Missouri communities and farms, closing more roads and threatening levees, water treatment plants and other critical infrastructure," Governor Mike Parson said in issuing his emergency declaration. "We will continue to work closely with our local partners to assess needs and provide resources to help as Missourians continue this flood fight and as we work to assist one another," Parson said.


Report claims Boeing has been forced to delay first Starliner launch by months

Report claims Boeing has been forced to delay first Starliner launch by months NASA needs a way to get astronauts to the International Space Station that doesn't involve paying Russia heaps of money, so it struck deals with both SpaceX and Boeing to build crew capsules capable of fulfilling that need. Earlier this month, SpaceX successfully sent its Crew Dragon capsule to the International Space Station, paving the way for crew tests to be conducted within months, but what about Boeing?A new report from Reuters suggests that Boeing is having a much, much harder time getting its Starliner spacecraft ready for its first big test. Boeing, which analysts thought would beat SpaceX's Crew Dragon to delivery by a significant margin, has now reportedly pushed back its maiden flight to the space station by several months, and the first crewed flights won't happen until close to the end of the year, if they happen in 2019 at all.The report, which cites unnamed sources, claims that the first unmanned test flight of Starliner has been delayed by three months. Adjusting the timeline based on that new information, Boeing's first crewed flight of the spacecraft wouldn't be ready until November, and that's assuming everything goes perfectly from here on out.Both Crew Dragon and Starliner have been plagued by delays over the past couple of years, forcing NASA to strike new deals with Russian space agency Roscosmos to fly NASA crew members to the ISS and back. The clock is ticking, and right now it's clear that SpaceX is much closer to delivering NASA much-needed crew-capable spacecraft than Boeing is.In the meantime, NASA is doing its best to prepare for a worst-case scenario in which one or potentially both programs fail to deliver before the end of 2019. The agency is mulling the decision to throw more money at Russia to ensure its astronauts can make it to the ISS throughout 2019 and into 2020, but no decisions have been finalized as of yet.


Gov. Newsom wants to charge you $10 a month to help clean up contaminated water

Gov. Newsom wants to charge you $10 a month to help clean up contaminated water Gov. Gavin Newsom wants to charge you $10 a month to help clean up contaminated water in low-income and rural areas.


See Photos of the New 2020 Porsche Cayenne Coupe

Giant inland sea created by the disastrous Mozambique cyclone

Giant inland sea created by the disastrous Mozambique cyclone Cyclone Idai left death, destruction, and a sprawling inland sea in its wake. The powerful tropical cyclone -- which struck Mozambique last Thursday as the equivalent of a Category 2 or 3 hurricane with winds of around 100 mph -- has left at least 150 dead and 600,000 in need of help in the flooded nation said the EU, though the Associated Press reports over 300 fatalities as of March 21 when accounting for deaths in neighboring Zimbabwe.The cyclone's widespread flooding -- in part overshadowed by simultaneous and historic flooding in the Midwest -- has left behind an inundated area some 200 square miles in size (518 square kilometers), with the inland sea reaching up to 15 miles wide, according to satellite images from the European Space Agency (ESA). > And for better comparison a GIF animation of the images showing the Mozambique flood before (March 2nd) and after (March 20th) Mozambique Copernicus Sentinel-1️ Better quality GIF https://t.co/h8608N8so5 MozambiqueFloods MozambiqueFloods2019 RemoteSensing Beira Idai pic.twitter.com/d9hOmdiBbp> > -- Pierre Markuse (@Pierre_Markuse) March 21, 2019The destruction is particularly severe around Mozambique's fourth largest city, Beira. SEE ALSO: The West accepts its drought-ridden future, slashes water use"The situation is terrible. The scale of devastation is enormous. It seems that 90 per cent of the area is completely destroyed," said the Red Cross's Jamie LeSueur, who is working in the region. > The latest delineation maps for Mozambique: > ✴️Nhantaze: 24,837.7 ha (248 sq km) flooded > ✴️Macorreia: 9,862.5 ha (98.6 sq km) flooded > Maps and geospatial data: https://t.co/w3uo4SPyREMozambiqueFloods Idai IdaiCyclone pic.twitter.com/0siHZhW6hM> > -- Copernicus EMS (@CopernicusEMS) March 21, 2019Though there's little evidence showing that the planet is experiencing more cyclones and hurricanes, there is mounting evidence that these storms are growing stronger compared to storms in the 21st century.What's more, cyclones, like any big storm today, can now carry more water: The world has warmed by 1.8 degrees Fahrenheit, or 1 Celsius, over the last century, and for every 1 degree C of warming the atmosphere holds seven percent more water. > This just in: shocking footage from our team via helicopter that has just arrived in Beira, Mozambique. The devastation is widespread with barely a house intact following CycloneIdaipic.twitter.com/BnyqVIJ9YF> > -- IFRC Africa (@IFRCAfrica) March 17, 2019Since the 1960s, only three tropical storms of category 3 or stronger have hit Mozambique, according to Weather.com.When the total number of fatalities are confirmed and the great inland sea dissipates, Idai's rampage may end up being the worst storm on record in the Southern Hemisphere, the EU noted.  WATCH: Jordan Peele explains the childhood experience that made him love horror


Sanders: ‘We Must Follow New Zealand’s Lead’ on Assault-Rifle Ban

Sanders: ‘We Must Follow New Zealand’s Lead’ on Assault-Rifle Ban Senator Bernie Sanders (I., Vt.) on Thursday praised New Zealand prime minister Jacinda Ardern for immediately banning military-style semi-automatic weapons in response to the Christchurch mosque shootings, and suggested the executive action should serve as a blueprint for the U.S.> This is what real action to stop gun violence looks like. We must follow New Zealand's lead, take on the NRA and ban the sale and distribution of assault weapons in the United States. https://t.co/lSAisDG9Ur> > -- Bernie Sanders (@BernieSanders) March 21, 2019The ban, which applies to semi-automatic rifles and shotguns that can be equipped with detachable magazines capable of holding more than five rounds, went into immediate effect Thursday to prevent stockpiling, and legislation codifying it is expected to pass Parliament in the coming days. Once the bill passes, New Zealanders will be granted a buyback period, after which they will be fined and jailed for up to three years if found in possession of a banned weapon.“On 15 March, our history changed forever. Now, our laws will, too,” Ardern said Thursday. “We are announcing action today on behalf of all New Zealanders to strengthen our gun laws and make our country a safer place.”Gun ownership is popular in New Zealand but there is no right to self defense codified in the country's laws.The announcement comes just six days after a 28-year-old Australian man killed 50 people and injured 40 others while rampaging through two mosques in Christchurch. The second shooting, at the Linwood mosque, was interrupted after one congregant retrieved his firearm from his house and returned to confront the attacker.While the exact weapon used in the attack remains unknown, images of the weapon appear to show an AR-15, a widely available semi-automatic rifle.Prior to the attack, the shooter published an extensive manifesto online that was replete with white-nationalist propaganda and mentioned stirring controversy around the U.S. gun-control debate as one motive for the massacre.Sanders, who was criticized by Hillary Clinton during the 2016 Democratic primaries for being too moderate on the issue of gun control, has in recent years embraced the Democratic establishment's insistence on banning assault rifles outright.Senator Chris Murphy (D., Conn.), who has helped lead Democrats' gun-control efforts since the Sandy Hook massacre, also praised Ardern's swift action in a Thursday tweet.> See. It’s not that hard. https://t.co/6nTAYmHjnb> > -- Chris Murphy (@ChrisMurphyCT) March 21, 2019


Venezuela opposition leader Juan Guaido says senior aide was kidnapped by intelligence agents

Venezuela opposition leader Juan Guaido says senior aide was kidnapped by intelligence agents The Venezuelan opposition leader Juan Guaido has said intelligence agents arrested his chief of staff after a pre-dawn raid, signalling that president Nicolas Maduro may be cracking down on the opposition's challenge to his rule. Mr Guaido invoked the constitution in January to assume the interim presidency after declaring Maduro's 2018 re-election a fraud, and has been recognised by dozens of Western nations as the country's legitimate leader. Mr Maduro, who has overseen a dramatic collapse of the country's economy, has called Mr Guaido a puppet of the United States and said he should “face justice”, but has not explicitly ordered his arrest.


Seats aboard JetBlue now feature most legroom of any US airline

Seats aboard JetBlue now feature most legroom of any US airline Long-legged flyers may be interested to learn that JetBlue's newest cabin redesign now features the most legroom of any US airline for economy-class cabins. 


Harvard 'shamelessly' profits from photos of enslaved people, descendant claims in lawsuit

Harvard 'shamelessly' profits from photos of enslaved people, descendant claims in lawsuit A descendant of enslaved people has sued Harvard University, alleging that the Ivy League institution has “shamelessly” profited from photos of her ancestors. Tamara Lanier, of Norwich, Connecticut, claims that Harvard has ignored requests to surrender images of a man named Renty, whom she says is her great-great-great grandfather, and his daughter Delia. Lanier is suing Harvard for “wrongful seizure, possession and expropriation” of the images, asking the university to return the photos to her, pay unspecified damages, and recognise her ancestry.


Ocasio-Cortez fires back at Fox News for 'Latina thing' segment

Ocasio-Cortez fires back at Fox News for 'Latina thing' segment Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez responded to Laura Igraham after the Fox News host and a guest mocked the freshman Democratic from New York for the way in which she pronounces her name.


New Zealand bans assault weapons within days of massacre

New Zealand bans assault weapons within days of massacre New Zealand imposed a ban on assault weapons Thursday, moving swiftly following the Christchurch massacre and triggering renewed calls from leading American politicians for gun controls in the United States. Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern said assault rifles and semi-automatic weapons were now banned with immediate effect, making good on a pledge to the country of the military-style weapons used in last week's slaughter of 50 people.


Australia says tensions with Turkey ease after WWI remarks

Australia says tensions with Turkey ease after WWI remarks SYDNEY (AP) — Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison said on Thursday tensions between his country and Turkey had eased after President Recep Tayyip Erdogan's office said comments by the Turkish leader that sparked the row had been taken out of context.


Lawyers release list of Illinois Catholic clergy accused of sexual misconduct

Lawyers release list of Illinois Catholic clergy accused of sexual misconduct Attorneys for clergy sex abuse victims released a new report Wednesday detailing all the Illinois priests who they say have been publicly accused of sexual abuse.


USC Just Named a New President. Here's What She Said About the Admissions Scandal

USC Just Named a New President. Here's What She Said About the Admissions Scandal "I am not afraid about taking on challenges," Carol Folt said.


Lithuanian pleads guilty in U.S. to massive fraud against Google, Facebook

Lithuanian pleads guilty in U.S. to massive fraud against Google, Facebook Evaldas Rimasauskas, 50, entered his plea to one count of wire fraud before U.S. District Judge George Daniels in Manhattan. Rimasauskas also agreed to forfeit about $49.7 million he personally obtained from the scheme, according to a court filing. Paul Petrus, a lawyer for Rimasauskas, said the plea spoke for itself and declined to comment further.


Citigroup to sell Venezuelan gold in setback to President Maduro: sources

Citigroup to sell Venezuelan gold in setback to President Maduro: sources Maduro's government has since 2014 used financial operations known as gold swaps to use its international reserves to gain access to cash after a slump in oil revenues left it struggling to obtain hard currency. Under the terms of the 2015 deal with Citigroup's Citibank, Venezuela was due to repay $1.1 billion of the loan on March 11, according to four sources familiar with the situation. Citibank plans to sell the gold held as a guarantee - which has a market value of roughly $1.358 billion - to recover the first tranche of the loan and will deposit the excess of roughly $258 million in a bank account in New York, two of the sources said.


Missouri River towns face deluge as floods move downstream

Missouri River towns face deluge as floods move downstream A string of small Missouri towns prepared for the next deluge along the raging Missouri River on Wednesday after flooding wreaked nearly $1.5 billion in damage in Nebraska, killing at least four people and leaving another man missing. High water unleashed by last week's late-winter storm and melting snow has already inundated a large swath of Missouri, Nebraska and Iowa along the Missouri River, North America's longest river. The Missouri River's next major flood crest was forecast to hit St. Joseph, Missouri, at 6 a.m. on Friday and Kansas City, Missouri, 55 miles (88 km) to the south, about 24 hours later, said Mike Glasch of the Omaha District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.


11-Year-Old Charged With Attempted Murder Appointed Public Defender

11-Year-Old Charged With Attempted Murder Appointed Public Defender An 11-year-old charged with two counts of attempted first-degree murder made his first court appearance in Memphis.


The Latest: Minnesota to help Nebraska flood fight

The Latest: Minnesota to help Nebraska flood fight KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP) — The Latest on Midwest flooding (all times local):


FBI joins criminal probe into Boeing 737 Max 8 safety certification in wake of crashes

FBI joins criminal probe into Boeing 737 Max 8 safety certification in wake of crashes The FBI has joined the widening criminal probe into how Boeing's 737 Max 8 jets were deemed as safe in the months before two of them crashed in Indonesia and Ethiopia,


Devin Nunes sued a Twitter account dedicated to a cow. Now it has more followers than he does

Devin Nunes sued a Twitter account dedicated to a cow. Now it has more followers than he does Rep. Devin Nunes filed a $250 million lawsuit against Twitter and a number of parody accounts. Now, one dedicated to a cow has, um, mooved past him.


Justice Clarence Thomas breaks three-year silence in Mississippi case about racial bias in jury selection

Justice Clarence Thomas breaks three-year silence in Mississippi case about racial bias in jury selection The Supreme Court's senior justice, who seldom speaks during oral argument, broke a three-year silence to ask questions in a race discrimination case.


The Latest: Responding officer testifies in teen's death

The Latest: Responding officer testifies in teen's death PITTSBURGH (AP) — The Latest on the homicide trial of a white Pennsylvania police officer in the shooting of an unarmed black 17-year-old (all times local):


Political spending by Abrams' nonprofit could pose problems

Political spending by Abrams' nonprofit could pose problems WASHINGTON (AP) — In a matter of months, Stacey Abrams has gone from losing the Georgia governor's race to being a heavily recruited Democratic star, urged to run for Senate and mentioned as a possible presidential contender.


'New bizarre low': Trump faces backlash after reviving McCain attacks

'New bizarre low': Trump faces backlash after reviving McCain attacks Republicans such as Lindsey Graham and Mitt Romney defended the late senator after the president said he ‘never liked’ himDonald Trump renewed attacks on the late senator John McCain, stating he “never liked” the Arizona Republican and “probably never will”.The president faced widespread backlash for reviving his criticism of McCain, who died of brain cancer last year.While Trump shared a notoriously contentious relationship with McCain, Republicans balked at Trump’s willingness to engage in posthumous attacks on the decorated war veteran. Some audience members in Ohio were members of the military.“I gave him the kind of funeral that he wanted, which as president I had to approve,” Trump said of McCain while touring a tank manufacturing plant in Lima, Ohio. “I don’t care about this. I didn’t get a thank you, that’s OK.”Trump returned to broadsides against McCain seven months after his death, amid reports in conservative media outlets that McCain was allegedly responsible for leaking the infamous Russia dossier, compiled by the British ex-spy Christopher Steele. The dossier detailed Trump’s ties to Moscow.In a tweet on Sunday, Trump criticised McCain for his role in the Russia investigation and voiced frustration with his deciding vote against the repeal of Obamacare in 2017.Trump also raised McCain’s healthcare vote during a joint appearance at the White House with the Brazilian president, Jair Bolsonaro, telling reporters he was “very unhappy that [McCain] didn’t repeal and replace Obamacare, as you know”.“They got to a vote, and he said thumbs down,” Trump said. “I think that’s disgraceful.”McCain’s daughter, Meghan McCain, hit back on Wednesday on ABC’s daytime talkshow The View, where she serves as a co-host.“If I had told my dad: ‘Seven months after you’re dead you’re going to be dominating the news and all over Twitter,’ he would think it’s hilarious that our president was so jealous of him that he was dominating the news cycle in death as well,” she said.“This is a new bizarre low. I will say attacking someone who isn’t here is a bizarre low,” she added.Trump’s comments also drew backlash from Republicans in Congress, who defended McCain as a “hero” after initially remaining silent.“I just want to lay it on the line, that the country deserves better, the McCain family deserves better. I don’t care if he’s president of United States, owns all the real estate in New York, or is building the greatest immigration system in the world,” Senator Johnny Isakson, from Georgia, said in an interview.“Nothing is more important than the integrity of the country and those who fought and risked their lives for all of us.” Isakson called the comments “deplorable”.Senator Martha McSally, the Republican appointed to fill McCain’s seat following his death, tweeted: “John McCain is an American hero and I am thankful for his life of service and legacy to our country and Arizona.“Everyone should give him and his family the respect, admiration, and peace they deserve,” she added.Senator Lindsey Graham, one of McCain’s closest friends who has also emerged as a vocal ally of Trump’s, said his comments “hurt him more than they hurt the legacy of Senator McCain”.“I can’t understand why the President would, once again, disparage a man as exemplary as my friend John McCain: heroic, courageous, patriotic, honorable, self-effacing, self-sacrificing, empathetic, and driven by duty to family, country, and God,” the Utah senator Mitt Romney wrote on Twitter.Trump first feuded with McCain during the 2016 campaign, after he mocked the senator for being held as a prisoner of war in Vietnam. McCain, who faced re-election in the Senate the same year, declined to endorse Trump even after he became the Republican presidential nominee.McCain continued to speak out against Trump until his death, delivering a speech in which he decried “half-baked, spurious nationalism” in a thinly veiled reference to the president.Trump was not invited to McCain’s funeral last year, which featured speeches by former presidents, including George W Bush and Barack Obama. Trump was not mentioned by name, but a stark contrast was drawn to his brand of politics.McCain’s wife, Cindy McCain, later explained the family’s decision to not invite Trump as a means of ensuring the ceremony would be conducted “with dignity”.“Even though it was a very public funeral, we are still a family,” McCain said in an interview with the BBC. “It was important to me that we kept it respectful and calm and not politicize it.”


Biden building 2020 White House campaign ahead of expected bid: sources

Biden building 2020 White House campaign ahead of expected bid: sources Biden has told supporters and former staff that he will run, according to one source who has knowledge of discussions. Biden and his aides also have reached out to donors and potential bundlers - people who volunteer to raise money on behalf of the candidate - to assess support, according to another source. A third source with direct knowledge of Biden's plans offered a caveat, saying the former vice president was very close to running, but "it’s not 100 percent." “We’re leaning into that moment” when Biden gives the green light, the source said.


Kentucky Governor Signs Law Prohibiting Abortions Based on Unborn’s Sex, Race, or Disabilities

Kentucky Governor Signs Law Prohibiting Abortions Based on Unborn’s Sex, Race, or Disabilities Kentucky governor Matt Bevin on Tuesday signed a bill that bans abortions chosen on the basis of an unborn child's sex, race, or disability.A court filing in the U.S. District Court in Louisville indicated that the governor has signed the bill, which included an "emergency clause" stipulating that it would go into effect immediately.Physicians must now certify in writing that the patient did not request the abortion for a reason related to the baby's sex, race, or disabilities. Flouting the new law puts doctors at risk of losing their medical license or being prosecuted for a felony, although the mother of the unborn child would not be targeted.The American Civil Liberties Union is challenging the bill in federal court as an unconstitutional restriction on a woman's right to abortion.“Instituting laws that instantly affect critical patient care should not be a cat-and-mouse game,” the group said, asking that it be notified when the bill is signed.Another new law that bans abortions after about six weeks or when a heartbeat can be detected forced Kentucky's sole abortion clinic, EMW Women's Surgical Center in Louisville, to cancel some appointments on Friday until a federal judge intervened.“EMW and its abortionists have responded with a novel claim: Women have a constitutional right to undergo race-based abortions, gender-based abortions, and disability-based abortions. In plaintiffs’ view, somewhere in the Fourteenth Amendment’s penumbra lies a protection for eugenics,” the governor's lawyer M. Stephen Pitt wrote in defending the ban on eugenics-based abortions. “This is a perverse distortion of Roe v. Wade.”


Amazon just unveiled an all-new Kindle

Amazon just unveiled an all-new Kindle Amazon on Wednesday rolled out an updated version of its Kindle e-reader, giving the entry-level version of the tablet a small price bump and adding a front light to it -- making this the first Kindle with a front light you can get your hands on for less than $100.At that price, it no doubt sounds like quite a steal, though there are a few key points to be aware of. This $89.99 version of the device includes the screen saver ads you'll have to accept, unless you want to pay more for a version of the Kindle without them. Amazon says this version of the Kindle also include updated electronic ink technology for better contrast, in addition to a six-inch, 167 PPI capacitive touch display.That display contrasts with the 300 PPI version found on the Kindle Paperwhite and Oasis, with the $90 Kindle also being the only one in the device family that isn't waterproof. So, again, there are some trade-offs if you want an e-reader at this low of a price.In terms of what else is new about the updated entry-level Kindle ... the front light is, well, kind of it. Which is not to say there aren't myriad benefits to mention, especially if this is your first Kindle or maybe even your first e-reader. It's thin and light, so it's easy to hold, and the on-device storage allows you to keep thousands of books on hand. You also get a battery that lasts for weeks, and for a limited time, Amazon will give you three months of Kindle Unlimited for free (a $30 value) when you order the device.Kindle Unlimited provides unlimited access to millions of titles, which lets you read popular authors across a range of genres as much as you want at no extra cost.The new Kindle is available for pre-order today in white or black on Amazon's website. It will start shipping on April 10. Amazon says that if you're a previous Kindle owner, you can trade in your device to receive an Amazon.com gift card for the appraised value as well as a 25% discount on a new device, including the all-new Kindle. You can also buy a cover for your new Kindle for $29.99.


Ford Will Build the Mustang Hybrid in Michigan and the Mustang-Inspired Electric Crossover in Mexico

Ford Will Build the Mustang Hybrid in Michigan and the Mustang-Inspired Electric Crossover in Mexico Both of these new models will be on sale in about two years.


2020 election: Kamala Harris and Beto O’Rourke jump in new poll, but Joe Biden and Bernie Sanders tie as frontrunners

2020 election: Kamala Harris and Beto O’Rourke jump in new poll, but Joe Biden and Bernie Sanders tie as frontrunners A new poll has revealed early gains for Kamala Harris and Beto O’Rourke in the growing field of 2020 Democratic presidential candidates — but they’re still far from being the frontrunners at this stage in the game. Joe Biden, the former vice president who has yet to formally announce his candidacy, has been leading the pack in a slate of polls putting him ahead of his lesser known potential opponents. Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders is now tied with Mr Biden at 26 per cent of total support from Democratic voters, however, according to a new Emerson poll released on Wednesday.


The Pentagon's Watchdog Is Investigating Whether the Acting Defense Secretary Boosted Boeing

The Pentagon's Watchdog Is Investigating Whether the Acting Defense Secretary Boosted Boeing The Department of Defense Office of Inspector General has launched an investigation into Acting Secretary of Defense Patrick Shanahan.


It's not just you: 4 in 5 Americans stressed out from poor office communication

It's not just you: 4 in 5 Americans stressed out from poor office communication Poor company communication has not only led employees to feel more stressed, but also to resent their bosses.


Turkey's Erdogan sparks spat with Australia, New Zealand

Turkey's Erdogan sparks spat with Australia, New Zealand ANKARA, Turkey (AP) — Turkey's president has sparked an acute diplomatic spat with far-off New Zealand and Australia, referring to a key World War I campaign and the more recent Christchurch mosque shooting as targeting Islam.


See Spy Photos of the Jeep Wrangler Plug-In Hybrid

Netanyahu says Iran has 'sensitive information' on rival, Tehran denies hack

Netanyahu says Iran has 'sensitive information' on rival, Tehran denies hack Without providing any evidence or details, Netanyahu said Iran had gleaned "sensitive information". Polls put Netanyahu's right-wing Likud and Gantz's centrist Blue and White party neck-and-neck, with election day three weeks away. Iran denied that its intelligence services had hacked Gantz's phone.


The bread crumb papers: Why Cohen document dump should worry Donald Trump and others

The bread crumb papers: Why Cohen document dump should worry Donald Trump and others Redactions can be used to avoid alerting a defendant before he's charged or tipping off suspects in a pending investigation. Who might that apply to?


Fox News contributor called ‘complete moron’ for falsely saying US was first to end slavery

Fox News contributor called ‘complete moron’ for falsely saying US was first to end slavery Fox News contributor Katie Pavlich attempted to counter Senator Elizabeth Warren’s call to discuss the injustices of slavery, and its lasting systemic impact on generations of African-Americans, by claiming that the United States does not get “enough credit” for ending slavery. While discussing reparations to descendents of enslaved people on Fox News’ "Outnumbered" on Tuesday, Ms Pavlich claimed that the US was the first country to abolish slavery. “They keep blaming America for the sin of slavery but the truth is, throughout human history, slavery existed, and America came along as the first country to end it within 150 years,” she said.


Glyphosate under fire from San Francisco to Sri Lanka

Glyphosate under fire from San Francisco to Sri Lanka Glyphosate, the world's most widely used herbicide and the active ingredient in Monsanto's weedkiller Roundup, is the subject of fierce controversy across the globe and is classified by the World Health Organization as "probably" being carcinogenic. A California court on Tuesday found that Roundup was a "substantial factor" in Edwin Hardeman, 70, getting non-Hodgkin's lymphoma after spraying the weedkiller on his garden for decades.


Nebraska underwater: 74 cities, 65 counties declare emergencies as flooding envelops state

Nebraska underwater: 74 cities, 65 counties declare emergencies as flooding envelops state Seventy-four cities, 65 counties and four tribal areas in Nebraska declared states of emergency Tuesday as swaths of the Midwest battled flooding rivers.


Danish MP told her baby not welcome in parliament

Danish MP told her baby not welcome in parliament A Danish MP said on Tuesday she was ordered to remove her infant daughter from parliament's chamber, sparking surprise in a country often hailed as a pioneer in women's rights. "You are not welcome with your baby in the parliament's chamber," speaker Pia Kjaersgaard, an outspoken former leader of the far-right Danish People's Party, allegedly told MP Mette Abildgaard. "I didn't ask for permission to bring her since I had previously seen another colleague bring a child into the chamber without any problems," Ms Abildgaard, whose Conservative party is part of the ruling centre-right coalition, wrote on Facebook. Ms Abildgaard, who is in her 30s, said she found herself in an exceptional situation with her five-month-old daughter, and had never brought her into the chamber before. But she said the infant was "in a good mood and had a pacifier in her mouth." Mette Abildgaard responded to the incident on Facebook Ms Kjaersgaard passed the message to an assistant, who then asked Ms Abildgaard to remove the baby from the room. Ms Abildgaard handed the child to an assistant and returned to the chamber to vote. "MPs should be in the chamber, not babies or children," insisted Ms Kjaersgaard when questioned by news agency Ritzau. She said clear rules would be issued on the subject. The Scandinavian country is often held up as a champion of gender equality and women's rights, and as a child and family-centred nation with generous parental leave. Ms Abildgaard noted that she was entitled to a year's maternity leave with full pay, but that she had chosen to return to work. Her Facebook post garnered more than 600 comments within the space of a few hours. New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern holds her baby after speaking at the UN General Assembly Credit: REUTERS/Carlo Allegri "A chamber that represents mothers, fathers and babies ought to be open to mothers, fathers and babies," one person wrote. In 2016, an Icelandic lawmaker made headlines after breastfeeding her infant while speaking at the podium in parliament. And in September, New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern became a symbol for working mothers when she brought her baby to the UN General Assembly in New York.


Apple launches second-generation AirPods and wireless charging case

Apple launches second-generation AirPods and wireless charging case Apple's week of hardware announcements continued on Wednesday with the reveal of its second-generation AirPods. The new wireless headphones feature an H1 chip that the company claims will improve performance, allow for faster connection times, increase talk time, and enable support for hands-free Siri."AirPods delivered a magical wireless experience and have become one of the most beloved products we've ever made. They connect easily with all of your devices, and provide crystal clear sound and intuitive, innovative control of your music and audio," said Phil Schiller, Apple's senior vice president of Worldwide Marketing.The Apple-designed H1 chip is said to enhance virtually everything about the AirPods, boosting the talk time by 50% over the first-gen AirPods, as well as cutting the time it takes to sync up with an iPhone, Apple Watch, or iPad in half. The new AirPods also support "Hey Siri," which means you can now change songs, make a phone call, adjust the volume, or get directions by saying "Hey Siri" followed by the command.There are two options when it comes to purchasing the new AirPods. You can either pick up the standard AirPods, which come with the same charging case at the same $159 price point, or the AirPods paired with the new wireless charging case, which costs $199. Both cases hold enough charge for up to 24 hours of additional listening time, but wireless case is compatible with Qi wireless chargers, so you don't have to plug it in.Finally, if you already own a pair of AirPods and don't feel like shelling out for the upgrade, you can grab the wireless charging case separately on Apple's website for $79.99. All three options are available now.


Punctuation Marks

'Generation Nazarbayev' jokes, hopes after Kazakh leader resigns

'Generation Nazarbayev' jokes, hopes after Kazakh leader resigns People under 30 in Kazakhstan have only known one leader -- Nursultan Nazarbayev, who announced his resignation this week after shepherding the country from the Soviet era. "The word 'Nazarbayev' means something like the word 'parent'," said 18-year-old film student Madi Makanov, who lives in the country's largest city Almaty. Kazakhstan has a young population, with around 40 percent of people under 24, according to estimates based on UN figures.


Trump Pours Gas on GM's Already Smoldering Relations With UAW

Trump Pours Gas on GM's Already Smoldering Relations With UAW In a series of tweets starting Saturday, Trump attacked both General Motors Co. and the UAW over the closing of a Chevrolet Cruze factory in Lordstown, Ohio. GM and the UAW each pushed back, but the two have otherwise been very much at odds entering bargaining over a new four-year labor contract.


Delta declared America's best airline: The Points Guy

Delta declared America's best airline: The Points Guy Delta Air Lines tops a new list of the best -- and worst -- airlines in America for its impressive on-time performance and network of lounges. 


Pilot who hitched a ride in cockpit saved doomed Lion Air Boeing 737 Max day before it crashed

Pilot who hitched a ride in cockpit saved doomed Lion Air Boeing 737 Max day before it crashed As the Lion Air crew fought to control their diving Boeing 737 Max 8, they got help from an unexpected source: an off-duty pilot who happened to be riding in the cockpit. That extra pilot, who was seated in the cockpit jumpseat, correctly diagnosed the problem and told the crew how to disable a malfunctioning flight-control system and save the plane, two people familiar with Indonesia’s investigation told Bloomberg. The next day, under command of a different crew facing what investigators said was an identical malfunction, the jetliner crashed into the Java Sea killing all 189 aboard. The previously undisclosed detail on the earlier Lion Air flight represents a new clue in the mystery of how some 737 Max pilots faced with the malfunction have been able to avert disaster while the others lost control of their planes and crashed. The presence of a third pilot in the cockpit wasn’t contained in Indonesia’s National Transportation Safety Committee’s November 28 report on the crash and hasn’t previously been reported. Airlines with Boeing 737 Max 8s in their fleet The so-called dead-head pilot on the earlier flight from Bali to Jakarta told the crew to cut power to the motor driving the nose down, according to the people familiar, part of a checklist that all pilots are required to memorise. “All the data and information that we have on the flight and the aircraft have been submitted to the Indonesian NTSC. We can’t provide additional comment at this stage due the ongoing investigation on the accident,” Lion Air spokesman Danang Prihantoro said. The Indonesia safety committee report said the plane had had multiple failures on previous flights and hadn’t been properly repaired. Representatives for Boeing and the Indonesian safety committee declined to comment on the earlier flight. The safety system, designed to keep planes from climbing too steeply and stalling, has come under scrutiny by investigators of the crash as well as a subsequent one less than five months later in Ethiopia. A malfunctioning sensor is believed to have tricked the Lion Air plane’s computers into thinking it needed to automatically bring the nose down to avoid a stall. Jakarta plane crash: Flight Lion Air JT610 Boeing’s 737 Max was grounded on March 13 by US regulatorsafter similarities to the Oct. 29 Lion Air crash emerged in the investigation of the March 10 crash of Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302. In the wake of the two accidents, questions have emerged about how Boeing’s design of the new 737 model were approved. The Transportation Department’s inspector general is conducting a review of how the plane was certified to fly and a grand jury under the US Justice Department is also seeking records in a possible criminal probe of the plane’s certification. The FAA last week said it planned to mandate changes in the system to make it less likely to activate when there is no emergency. The agency and Boeing said they are also going to require additional training and references to it in flight manuals. “We will fully cooperate in the review in the Department of Transportation’s audit,” Boeing spokesman Charles Bickers said. The company has declined to comment on the criminal probe. After the Lion Air crash, two US pilots’ unions said the potential risks of the system, known as the Maneuvering Characteristics Augmentation System, or MCAS, hadn’t been sufficiently spelled out in their manuals or training. None of the documentation for the Max aircraft included an explanation, the union leaders said. “We don’t like that we weren’t notified,’’ Jon Weaks, president of the Southwest Airlines Pilots Association, said in November. “It makes us question, ‘Is that everything, guys?’ I would hope there are no more surprises out there.’’ The Allied Pilots Association union at American Airlines Group Inc. also said details about the system weren’t included in the documentation about the plane. Following the Lion Air crash, the FAA required Boeing to notify airlines about the system and Boeing sent a bulletin to all customers flying the Max reminding them how to disable it in an emergency. Authorities have released few details about Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302 other than it flew a “very similar” track as the Lion Air planes and then dove sharply into the ground. There have been no reports of maintenance issues with the Ethiopian Airlines plane before its crash. If the same issue is also found to have helped bring down Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302, one of the most vexing questions crash investigators and aviation safety consultants are asking is why the pilots on that flight didn’t perform the checklist that disables the system. “After this horrific Lion Air accident, you’d think that everyone flying this airplane would know that’s how you turn this off,” said Steve Wallace, the former director of the US Federal Aviation Administration’s accident investigation branch. The combination of factors required to bring down a plane in these circumstances suggests other issues may also have occurred in the Ethiopia crash, said Jeffrey Guzzetti, who also directed accident investigations at FAA and is now a consultant. “It’s simply implausible that this MCAS deficiency by itself can down a modern jetliner with a trained crew,” Guzzetti said. MCAS is driven by a single sensor near the nose that measures the so-called angle of attack, or whether air is flowing parallel to the length of the fuselage or at an angle. On the Lion Air flights, the angle-of-attack sensor had failed and was sending erroneous readings indicating the plane’s nose was pointed dangerously upward. Sign up for your essential, twice-daily briefing from The Telegraph with our free Front Page newsletter.


The Supreme Court Ruled That Immigrants With a Criminal Past Can Be Detained Years After Serving Time

The Supreme Court Ruled That Immigrants With a Criminal Past Can Be Detained Years After Serving Time The 5-4 ruling gives the federal government the power to detain immigrants with a criminal past years after they finish serving time