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Poland shuns Israel summit amid Holocaust row

Poland shuns Israel summit amid Holocaust row Poland's prime minister on Monday cancelled Warsaw's participation in a summit in Jerusalem, accusing Israel's foreign minister of "racist" comments about the actions of Poles during the Holocaust, in a row that has stoked outrage and soured relations. Mateusz Morawiecki's decision to scotch Poland's involvement in the summit of central European nations follows days of angry exchanges that were originally sparked by quotes from Israeli leader Benjamin Netanyahu over the role of Poles during World War II. Slovak government spokeswoman Patricia Macikova told AFP this week's summit with Israel and the Visegrad Four (V4) -- the Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland and Slovakia -- would be postponed until later in the year following Poland's pull out.


India takes Pakistan to UN's highest court in spying case

India takes Pakistan to UN's highest court in spying case THE HAGUE, Netherlands (AP) — India on Monday accused Pakistan of breaching the rights of an alleged spy who was sentenced to death by a Pakistani military court, a case at the U.N.'s highest court that has exacerbated tensions between the longtime rivals.


Shamima Begum is 'traumatised', says her lawyer as he likens Isil bride to a First World War soldier

Shamima Begum is 'traumatised', says her lawyer as he likens Isil bride to a First World War soldier The Isil bride who travelled to Syria to marry a terrorist is "traumatised", according to her lawyer, who likened his client to a World War One soldier.  Shamima Begum, 19, flew to the Middle East four years ago to join the terror group. There, she married a Dutch-born fighter with whom she had three children.  Her two eldest children have died, but she gave birth at a refugee camp in northeastern Syria on the weekend and now wants to return to Britain.  In an interview over the weekend, Begum said that people should be feeling sympathy for her, and her lawyer Tasnime Akunjee defended her attitude.  He told ITV's Good Morning Britain: "I think it's difficult to take what she's saying in the current circumstances and try to draw from the lack of emotion that she has.  "She's a traumatised person. She finds herself in a camp and was clearly quite attached to her husband, it would seem, and suddenly he's not by her side." Lawyer Tasnime Akunjee Credit: Emrah Gurel/AP When confronted with the fact Begum does not seem traumatised and instead appeared to be composed, Mr Akunjee said: "You might've said the same thing about a World War One soldier in the middle of shellshock." Presenter Philip Madeley said this comparison was "a bit of a stretch", to which Mr Akumjee responded:  "It's a warzone. They're both warzones." The Begum's family lawyer, Mr Akunjee, said he understood some of the responses to her pleas for sympathy. He told BBC Breakfast: "The family have gone out of their way from day one to try to get her away from the Isil narrative and the context which she finds herself in. "She's been there for four years and we would be surprised if she hadn't been further damaged beyond the degree she had already been groomed into. "The family are concerned, as they have been for the last four years, not just to get her away, but, as of yesterday, to make sure that their grandchild - her child - is not influenced by that sort of thinking." Mr Akunjee said he anticipated that Begum would probably face criminal proceedings upon any return to the UK, but said it was the family's hope that she would be given professional help following her experience in Syria. Begum was one of three schoolgirls, along with Kadiza Sultana and Amira Abase, from Bethnal Green Academy who left the UK for Syria in February 2015. Ms Sultana was reported to have been killed in an air strike in 2016, while the other two are reported to still be alive. 'Show me some sympathy', says Isil bride after giving birth The British schoolgirl who ran away to join Isil has appealed for public sympathy following the birth of her son, as a row intensifies over whether she should be allowed to return to the UK. Shamima Begum, 19, went to Syria in 2015 and was discovered there in a refugee camp last week, heavily pregnant and insisting she wanted to go home. The birth of her child over the weekend prompted calls for the baby to be subject to care proceedings should Begum be able to return from Syria, as it emerged that the Family Division of the High Court had presided over cases involving at least 150 children deemed at risk of radicalisation in the last five years. In an interview with Sky News recorded at the Kurdish-controlled camp to which she fled from the last pocket of Isil-controlled territory, Begum said there was "no evidence" she had done anything wrong and she could not see "any reason" why her child should be taken from her when she had simply been living as a housewife. Speaking just hours after giving birth, her baby at her side, she said she had no regrets about fleeing the family home in Bethnal Green, east London, to support Isil, claiming the experience had made her "stronger, tougher". Shamima Begum's Dutch-born husband Yago Riedjik She said she could see a future for herself and her son, whom she has named Jarah after one of the two children she lost to malnutrition and disease in the last three months, "if the UK are willing to take me back and help me start a new life again and try and move on from everything that’s happened in the last four years". She added: "I wouldn’t have found someone like my husband [Yago Riedijk, 26, a Muslim convert from the Netherlands] in the UK. I had my kids, I had a good time there." Her other children, Jarah and Surayah, a daughter, died aged 18 months and nine months. Asked how she felt about the debate over whether she should be allowed to return home, Begum said: "I feel a lot of people should have sympathy for me, for everything I’ve been through. "I didn’t know what I was getting into when I left, I just was hoping that maybe for the sake of me and my child they let me come back.  "I can’t live in this camp forever. It’s not really possible." In the interview, Begum apologised for the first time to her family for running away, and said that though she knew it was "like a big slap in the face" for her to ask after she had previously rejected their calls for her to return, "I really need their help". Tim Loughton, deputy chairman of the home affairs select committee, said he thought it "extraordinary" that Begum was asking to come back while showing "not a scintilla of regret". The Conservative MP added: "My own feeling is in line with most others, that she has made her bed and should lie in it. But the law must prevail and we are probably going to have to let her back" "However, I think her child should be subjected to care proceedings due to the threat of radicalisation." He said a forthcoming report by the Henry Jackson Society disclosed that the Family Division of the High Court had presided over cases involving at least 150 children deemed at risk of radicalisation in the last five years. Sajid Javid, the Home Secretary, said last week that he would "not hesitate" to prevent the return of anyone who supported terrorist organisations abroad. He reiterated his stance in a Sunday newspaper article, expressing compassion for any child born or brought into a conflict zone, but stating that the safety and security of children living in this country had to be the priority. Isil schoolgirls' journey into Syria Jeremy Wright, the Culture Secretary and former Attorney General, said Britain was "obliged" to take back British citizens.  However, he added: "That doesn’t mean that we can’t put in place the necessary security measures to monitor their activities. It doesn’t mean either that we can’t seek to hold them to account for their behaviour thus far.”  He said the nationality of Begum’s baby was a "difficult question", but the pair’s health was the most pressing matter. "In the end she will have to answer for her actions," he added. "So I think it is right that if she’s able to come back to the UK that she does so on the understanding that we can hold her to account for her behaviour thus far." Ms Begum said she was attracted to Isil by videos that she had seen online, which she said showed "how they’ll take care of you". She said she knew that the group carried out beheadings, but that she "was OK with it at first. I started becoming religious just before I left and from what I heard Islamically that is all allowed". "At first it was nice," she said of life in the so-called Islamic State. "It was how they showed it in the videos, you know, you come, make a family together, but then things got harder.  "We had to keep moving and moving and moving. The situation got fraught." Begum acknowledged that it would be "really hard" to be rehabilitated after everything she had been through.   "I’m still in that mentality of planes over my head, emergency backpacks, starving... it would be a big shock to go back to the UK and start again," she said. Isil bride Shamima Begum | Read more Writing in The Sunday Times, Mr Javid said that decisions about what to do with potential returnees had to be made on a case-by-case basis, based on the "facts of each case, the law and the threat to national security". He added: "I think about the children that could in future get caught up in dangerous groups if we don’t take a firm stance against those who support them… And that means sending a message to those who have backed terrorism: there will be consequences." His comments were described as "sick" by Ms Begum’s lawyer on Sunday. Mr Akunje told Radio 4’s The World This Weekend: "We are talking about a newborn baby who poses no risk or threat to anybody, [who is] not even cognitive, and yet he’s speaking about a child who’s a British citizen in terms of a security threat." Mr Akunje suggested that the birth of Begum’s child increased pressure on the British authorities to allow her to return home. He also revealed that Begum’s family has struggled to make direct contact with her and is now considering the possibility of getting out to Syria themselves. Her family has indicated that if she is jailed for supporting a terrorist group, they want to step in and raise her son themselves. Cressida Dick hits back at claims Met failed  The Metropolitan Police Commissioner has hit back at claims that officers failed to stop another runaway schoolgirl on the same flight as a 15-year-old arrested as she attempted to flee the UK to join Islamic State (IS). Cressida Dick said it was "incredibly complicated" and difficult to know about somebody's intentions, and claimed the schoolgirls - Sharmeena Begum and another unnamed passenger - were in fact on separate flights as the latter was pulled from the runway at Heathrow in December 2014 when she sought to get to Syria. The Times newspaper said the 15-year-old was arrested but not prosecuted, despite officers finding extremist material on her devices. Asked about the flight to Istanbul, on which both Sharmeena Begum and the unnamed 15-year-old were said to have been passengers en route to Syria, Ms Dick told ITV's Good Morning Britain: "I think it was actually a different flight and I think the question that's being asked is whether we were able to pass on sufficient information and understand well enough what these three girls were intending. "The truth of the matter is it's incredibly hard to know what somebody's intending. "The moment we informed the school about the girl who came off the flight, we did not know these girls were intending that, they were merely witnesses and we were talking to them as witnesses. These things are incredibly complicated. "We try to stop people from travelling when we knew they were travelling with ill-intent." Sign up for your essential, twice-daily briefing from The Telegraph with our free Front Page newsletter.


EU states mixed on Trump demand to take back IS fighters

EU states mixed on Trump demand to take back IS fighters BRUSSELS (AP) — U.S. President Donald Trump's demand that European countries take back their citizens fighting in Syria received a mixed reaction Monday, as nations voiced concerns about how to bring home-grown Islamic State extremists to trial.


Iranian president: US sanctions are 'economic war' on Iran

Iranian president: US sanctions are 'economic war' on Iran TEHRAN, Iran (AP) — Iran's president on Monday described U.S. sanctions imposed on Iran as an economic war being waged on his country and stressed that "economic war is more difficult than military war."


Iranian president: US sanctions are 'economic war' on Iran

Iranian president: US sanctions are 'economic war' on Iran TEHRAN, Iran (AP) — Iran's president on Monday described U.S. sanctions imposed on Iran as an economic war being waged on his country and stressed that "economic war is more difficult than military war."


Belgian Jewish museum trial interrupted as juror questioned

Belgian Jewish museum trial interrupted as juror questioned The trial of a Frenchman accused of shooting dead four people at the Jewish museum of Belgium was interrupted on Monday as police were summoned to question a juror. "We cannot start the closing arguments under these conditions," judge Laurence Massart said, after recusing the juror for having communicated with outside parties. "The sixth juror contacted police officials on Friday afternoon to say he met with parties not heard in this trial with whom he discussed the case file," she added.


Belgian Jewish museum trial interrupted as juror questioned

Belgian Jewish museum trial interrupted as juror questioned The trial of a Frenchman accused of shooting dead four people at the Jewish museum of Belgium was interrupted on Monday as police were summoned to question a juror. "We cannot start the closing arguments under these conditions," judge Laurence Massart said, after recusing the juror for having communicated with outside parties. "The sixth juror contacted police officials on Friday afternoon to say he met with parties not heard in this trial with whom he discussed the case file," she added.


National emergency protests, Presidents Day: 5 things you need to know Monday

National emergency protests, Presidents Day: 5 things you need to know Monday From protests against President Donald Trump's national emergency declaration to the collapse of British airline Flybmi, here's what to know Monday.


Here are 3 small steps to grow savings of thousands of dollars in a 401(k)

Here are 3 small steps to grow savings of thousands of dollars in a 401(k) Most people don't amass big savings overnight. Start small in a 401(k) and keep building with bonuses, remembering the power of dollar-cost averaging.


Here are 3 small steps to grow savings of thousands of dollars in a 401(k)

Here are 3 small steps to grow savings of thousands of dollars in a 401(k) Most people don't amass big savings overnight. Start small in a 401(k) and keep building with bonuses, remembering the power of dollar-cost averaging.


Russia's RT fumes after Facebook blocks 'wildly popular' page

Russia's RT fumes after Facebook blocks 'wildly popular' page Facebook has blocked a popular page run by Russian state TV channel RT, the channel's editor said Monday, criticising the move as an attack on media rights. The project was wildly popular -- 2.5 billion views and four million subscribers on Facebook alone!" RT editor-in-chief Margarita Simonyan said on her Telegram social network account. "We didn't violate any Facebook rules," she said.


Russia's RT fumes after Facebook blocks 'wildly popular' page

Russia's RT fumes after Facebook blocks 'wildly popular' page Facebook has blocked a popular page run by Russian state TV channel RT, the channel's editor said Monday, criticising the move as an attack on media rights. The project was wildly popular -- 2.5 billion views and four million subscribers on Facebook alone!" RT editor-in-chief Margarita Simonyan said on her Telegram social network account. "We didn't violate any Facebook rules," she said.


Venezuela expels Europe lawmakers as aid showdown intensifies

Venezuela expels Europe lawmakers as aid showdown intensifies Venezuela has expelled five visiting European lawmakers, an act opposition leader Juan Guaido branded "irrational" as his showdown with President Nicolas Maduro over the arrival of international aid intensifies. The members of the European Parliament were being tossed out with no explanation, said Spanish MEP Esteban Gonzalez Pons, who led the group. "We are being expelled from Venezuela.


India, Pakistan 'spy' row heads for UN top court amid tensions

India, Pakistan 'spy' row heads for UN top court amid tensions India will on Monday renew its bid to persuade international judges to take an alleged spy off death row in Pakistan, in a controversial court case as fresh bloodshed in Kashmir sends tensions between the neighbours soaring. Kulbhushan Sudhir Jadhav, a former Indian navy officer, was arrested in the restive southwestern Pakistani province of Baluchistan in March 2016 on charges of espionage and sentenced to death by a military court. India insists Jadhav was not a spy and that he was kidnapped in Pakistan.


Australia's major political parties hacked by 'state actor' ahead of elections

Australia's major political parties hacked by 'state actor' ahead of elections A “sophisticated state actor” was behind a cyberattack on the Australian Parliament's computing network that also affected the network of major political parties, the prime minister said on Monday. Prime Minister Scott Morrison did not identify the state behind what he described as a “malicious intrusion” on Feb 8. A joint statement from House of Representatives speaker Tony Smith and Senate president Scott Ryan said at the time there was no evidence that data had been accessed in the breach. But lawmakers were advised to change passwords. Morrison revealed Monday that the computer networks of the government parties - the Liberal Party and the Nationals - as well as the opposition Labor Party had also been affected. Australia's security agencies were securing those systems and protecting users, he said. “Our cyber experts believe that a sophisticated state actor is responsible for this malicious activity,” Morrison told reporters. “Let me be clear, though - there is no evidence of any electoral interference. We have put in place a number of measures to ensure the integrity of our electoral system,” he added. The Australian Cyber Security Center, the government's main cyber security agency, had briefed federal and state election authorities, Morrison said. New South Wales, Australia's most populous state, will hold elections on March 23. A federal election will be held on a date to be set in May. Duncan Lewis, director general of the Australian Security Intelligence Organization, the nation's main spy agency, would not comment on how deeply the attack had penetrated the computer networks. “The electoral machinery which we have in this country, that's the Australian Electoral Commission and the various state electoral commissions that work with the federal system - there is no evidence that they have been compromised,” Lewis told a Senate committee. He would not say whether the attack had been neutralized, saying it was “being managed.” Although Australian officials have not blamed any country, in 2011 it was reported that China was suspected of accessing the email system used by lawmakers and parliamentary staff. Election interference has been high on the international agenda ever since America's 2016 presidential election, in which Russian hackers stole and published more than 150,000 emails from various Democratic targets in what U.S. spymasters and senior lawmakers have described as a wide-ranging effort to help elect Donald Trump.


Australia's major political parties hacked by 'state actor' ahead of elections

Australia's major political parties hacked by 'state actor' ahead of elections A “sophisticated state actor” was behind a cyberattack on the Australian Parliament's computing network that also affected the network of major political parties, the prime minister said on Monday. Prime Minister Scott Morrison did not identify the state behind what he described as a “malicious intrusion” on Feb 8. A joint statement from House of Representatives speaker Tony Smith and Senate president Scott Ryan said at the time there was no evidence that data had been accessed in the breach. But lawmakers were advised to change passwords. Morrison revealed Monday that the computer networks of the government parties - the Liberal Party and the Nationals - as well as the opposition Labor Party had also been affected. Australia's security agencies were securing those systems and protecting users, he said. “Our cyber experts believe that a sophisticated state actor is responsible for this malicious activity,” Morrison told reporters. “Let me be clear, though - there is no evidence of any electoral interference. We have put in place a number of measures to ensure the integrity of our electoral system,” he added. The Australian Cyber Security Center, the government's main cyber security agency, had briefed federal and state election authorities, Morrison said. New South Wales, Australia's most populous state, will hold elections on March 23. A federal election will be held on a date to be set in May. Duncan Lewis, director general of the Australian Security Intelligence Organization, the nation's main spy agency, would not comment on how deeply the attack had penetrated the computer networks. “The electoral machinery which we have in this country, that's the Australian Electoral Commission and the various state electoral commissions that work with the federal system - there is no evidence that they have been compromised,” Lewis told a Senate committee. He would not say whether the attack had been neutralized, saying it was “being managed.” Although Australian officials have not blamed any country, in 2011 it was reported that China was suspected of accessing the email system used by lawmakers and parliamentary staff. Election interference has been high on the international agenda ever since America's 2016 presidential election, in which Russian hackers stole and published more than 150,000 emails from various Democratic targets in what U.S. spymasters and senior lawmakers have described as a wide-ranging effort to help elect Donald Trump.


This Week: Walmart results, Fed minutes, US home sales

This Week: Walmart results, Fed minutes, US home sales A look at some of the key business events and economic indicators upcoming this week:


This Week: Walmart results, Fed minutes, US home sales

This Week: Walmart results, Fed minutes, US home sales A look at some of the key business events and economic indicators upcoming this week:


Spanish victims of sex abuse priests speak out

Spanish victims of sex abuse priests speak out A trickle of accusations of sexual abuse against priests in schools and seminaries is starting to erode the wall of silence in Catholic Spain, whose Church representatives are set to attend a major Vatican meeting on child protection. "This is only the tip of the iceberg," warned Miguel Hurtado, who recently made his case public. For 20 years, Hurtado stayed quiet, trying to come to terms with the abuse he suffered when he joined a boy scout troup at the Santa Maria de Montserrat Abbey, which sits high up in jagged mountains northwest of Barcelona.


Russia pioneering return of 'ISIS children'

Russia pioneering return of 'ISIS children' As the end nears for the IS enclave in Syria and the fate of jihadists' family members becomes a prescient issue, Russia can be seen as a pioneer in systematically returning children of Islamist fighters home. A potential homecoming of the many foreign women who have gone to live in the IS "caliphate" and their children, many of whom were born there, has been a subject of debate in Russia, with some security chiefs seeing them as potential threats. Earlier this month, 27 children, from four to 13 years old, were flown from Iraq to the Moscow region.


Russia pioneering return of 'ISIS children'

Russia pioneering return of 'ISIS children' As the end nears for the IS enclave in Syria and the fate of jihadists' family members becomes a prescient issue, Russia can be seen as a pioneer in systematically returning children of Islamist fighters home. A potential homecoming of the many foreign women who have gone to live in the IS "caliphate" and their children, many of whom were born there, has been a subject of debate in Russia, with some security chiefs seeing them as potential threats. Earlier this month, 27 children, from four to 13 years old, were flown from Iraq to the Moscow region.


Venezuela denies EU lawmakers entry given 'conspiratorial motives'

Venezuela denies EU lawmakers entry given 'conspiratorial motives' Venezuela denied a group of European Parliament deputies entry into the country on Sunday, arguing they had "conspiratorial motives" for flying to Caracas in the throes of a political crisis. The European Parliament last month joined a slew of Western nations in recognizing Venezuelan opposition chief Juan Guaido as interim head of state after President Nicolas Maduro won a second term in an election last year that critics denounced as a sham. The four deputies from the center-right European People's Party (EPP) were traveling to Venezuela to meet with Guaido, one of them said in a video distributed via social media.


Venezuela denies EU lawmakers entry given 'conspiratorial motives'

Venezuela denies EU lawmakers entry given 'conspiratorial motives' Venezuela denied a group of European Parliament deputies entry into the country on Sunday, arguing they had "conspiratorial motives" for flying to Caracas in the throes of a political crisis. The European Parliament last month joined a slew of Western nations in recognizing Venezuelan opposition chief Juan Guaido as interim head of state after President Nicolas Maduro won a second term in an election last year that critics denounced as a sham. The four deputies from the center-right European People's Party (EPP) were traveling to Venezuela to meet with Guaido, one of them said in a video distributed via social media.


Ready, Aim, Fire!: Watch This Deadly Russian T-90MS Tank Go To War

Ready, Aim, Fire!: Watch This Deadly Russian T-90MS Tank Go To War All to capture some important arms sales.


Ready, Aim, Fire!: Watch This Deadly Russian T-90MS Tank Go To War

Ready, Aim, Fire!: Watch This Deadly Russian T-90MS Tank Go To War All to capture some important arms sales.


Poland shuns Israel summit amid Holocaust row

Poland shuns Israel summit amid Holocaust row Poland's prime minister on Monday cancelled Warsaw's participation in a summit in Jerusalem, accusing Israel's foreign minister of "racist" comments about the actions of Poles during the Holocaust, in a row that has stoked outrage and soured relations. Mateusz Morawiecki's decision to scotch Poland's involvement in the summit of central European nations follows days of angry exchanges that were originally sparked by quotes from Israeli leader Benjamin Netanyahu over the role of Poles during World War II. Czech Prime Minister Andrej Babis said said the summit with Israel and the Visegrad Four -- the Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland and Slovakia -- was cancelled but that there would be bilateral talks.


Family: UK teen who joined Islamic State has baby in Syria

Family: UK teen who joined Islamic State has baby in Syria LONDON (AP) — The family of a British teenager who ran away to join the Islamic State group and now wants to return to the U.K. said Sunday she has given birth to a baby boy.


Family: UK teen who joined Islamic State has baby in Syria

Family: UK teen who joined Islamic State has baby in Syria LONDON (AP) — The family of a British teenager who ran away to join the Islamic State group and now wants to return to the U.K. said Sunday she has given birth to a baby boy.


Fast-moving storm will bring pockets of heavy rain to Southland on Sunday

Fast-moving storm will bring pockets of heavy rain to Southland on Sunday A fast-moving storm system is expected to bring heavy rain to parts of the Southland while dumping several inches of snow in the mountains.


Fast-moving storm will bring pockets of heavy rain to Southland on Sunday

Fast-moving storm will bring pockets of heavy rain to Southland on Sunday A fast-moving storm system is expected to bring heavy rain to parts of the Southland while dumping several inches of snow in the mountains.


Yemen's warring parties agree on initial redeployment: U.N

Yemen's warring parties agree on initial redeployment: U.N Yemeni government and Houthi representatives have reached an agreement on the first phase of their redeployment of forces under a U.N.-sponsored deal for the warring armies to leave the Yemeni port city of Hodeidah, the United Nations said on Sunday. "The parties reached an agreement on Phase 1 of the mutual redeployment of forces," a statement by the U.N. spokesman's office said without giving details of exactly what the Iranian-aligned Houthis and the Saudi-backed government agreed. The United Nations is trying to implement a truce and troop-withdrawal accord in Hodeidah, the main entry point for most of Yemen's imports, as part of efforts to end a war that has killed tens of thousands and left millions on the brink of starvation.


How many push-ups can you do? Study finds men who can do 40 have lower risk of heart disease

How many push-ups can you do? Study finds men who can do 40 have lower risk of heart disease Active, middle-aged men who could do more than 40 push-ups in timed test had significantly lower risks for heart problems, according to a new study.


How many push-ups can you do? Study finds men who can do 40 have lower risk of heart disease

How many push-ups can you do? Study finds men who can do 40 have lower risk of heart disease Active, middle-aged men who could do more than 40 push-ups in timed test had significantly lower risks for heart problems, according to a new study.


Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez Celebrated Amazon Pulling Out of New York––But the Governor Says It Cost the City 25,000 Jobs

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez Celebrated Amazon Pulling Out of New York––But the Governor Says It Cost the City 25,000 Jobs The spat between Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and Gov. Andrew Cuomo lays bare a growing divide over Amazon's decision to pull out of New York City.


Watch Mike Pence gasp when no one claps at his terrible applause line

Watch Mike Pence gasp when no one claps at his terrible applause line Vice President Mike Pence isn't a complicated man. He likes Chili's, using his personal AOL account for official government business, and gay conversion therapy. And so, when he addressed attendees at the Middle East conference in Poland on Feb. 14, it's clear he believed that same down-home flavor that's treated him so well in Trump Country would garner rounds of applause from his European audience. That, dear reader, is where he went wrong.Speaking about the widely supported Iran nuclear deal, Pence told those in attendance that it was time to follow in the footsteps of the U.S. and withdraw. The response, or rather lack thereof, from the crowd appeared to shock the veep. SEE ALSO: Sure looks like Trump declared a 'national emergency' via the Notes app"The time has come for our European partners to stand with us and the Iranian people, to stand with our allies and friends in the region," he told the audience. "The time has come for our European partners to withdraw from the Iran nuclear deal and join with us as we bring the economic and diplomatic pressure necessary to give the Iranian people, the region, and the world, the peace, security, and freedom they deserve."The video pretty much says it all. > OMG -- Pence was visibly shook in Poland when he received absolutely no reaction to what was clearly supposed to be an applause line about how "the time has come for our European partners to withdraw from the Iran nuclear deal." pic.twitter.com/biRxARZkcM> > -- Aaron Rupar (@atrupar) February 16, 2019Amazing, right? The people of the internet think so, too. > Surprised no one threw a shoe at him.> > -- Warren (@Rusty94582) February 17, 2019> His desperate gasp for breath is priceless!!!> > -- Craig Lapierre (@clspartan) February 17, 2019> Not sure what's more embarrassing: That he has so many beats for applause written into his script, or that the applause never came.> > -- Johnny Moonrock (@JohnnyMoonrock) February 17, 2019Notably, this has been happening to Pence a lot lately. On Feb. 15, he was speaking at the 55th annual Munich Security Conference, and told those gathered that Trump says hello."I bring greetings from the 45th President of the United States of America, President Donald Trump."Deafening silence followed. Better luck next time.  WATCH: Cardi B speaks out on government shutdown


Polish PM cancels trip to Israel in wake of comments on Poles in Holocaust

Polish PM cancels trip to Israel in wake of comments on Poles in Holocaust Poland's prime minister has canceled a trip to Israel in the wake of reported remarks made by his Israeli counterpart suggesting Polish complicity during the Holocaust, an aide in his office told Polish media on Sunday. A government spokeswoman confirmed to Reuters that Prime Minister Mateusz Morawiecki would not attend the summit and would send Foreign Minister Jacek Czaputowicz instead. Morawiecki informed Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu of his decision to cancel his visit in a telephone call on Sunday afternoon, spokeswoman Joanna Kopcinska said.


Average tax refunds fall for second straight week, creating political flashpoint

Average tax refunds fall for second straight week, creating political flashpoint The average refund in the second week of the filing season was $1,949, down 8.7 percent from $2,135 a year earlier.


Victoria Beckham goes 'retro' at London Fashion Week show

Victoria Beckham goes 'retro' at London Fashion Week show Exaggerated collars, leopard print and a strong colour palette: British designer Victoria Beckham turned to "pinches of the '70s" as she showcased her latest collection Sunday at London Fashion Week. The former Spice Girl chose the rarified galleries of the Tate Britain museum, a neoclassical building home to some of the country's most treasured art, for only her second catwalk show in the British capital. "I have been thinking about what women want, about modern femininity," she told audiences in show notes describing her autumn/winter 2019 collection.


Victoria Beckham goes 'retro' at London Fashion Week show

Victoria Beckham goes 'retro' at London Fashion Week show Exaggerated collars, leopard print and a strong colour palette: British designer Victoria Beckham turned to "pinches of the '70s" as she showcased her latest collection Sunday at London Fashion Week. The former Spice Girl chose the rarified galleries of the Tate Britain museum, a neoclassical building home to some of the country's most treasured art, for only her second catwalk show in the British capital. "I have been thinking about what women want, about modern femininity," she told audiences in show notes describing her autumn/winter 2019 collection.