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What's the future for cash? Target register outages prove physical loot still has its place

What's the future for cash? Target register outages prove physical loot still has its place Is cash on borrowed time? The outages at Target stores remind us that nothing beats cash when technology fails.


Trump supporters in Florida say the president needs a third term

Trump supporters in Florida say the president needs a third term Conservatives at the official launch of the Trump 2020 campaign in Orlando say that illegal immigrants have no place in the U.S. and that if President Trump could have a third term, they would be onboard.


High school graduates fall ill during trip to Dominican Republic

High school graduates fall ill during trip to Dominican Republic A group of high school graduates are the latest to fall ill in the Dominican Republic.


Egypt: UN office tries to politicize Morsi's courtroom death

Egypt: UN office tries to politicize Morsi's courtroom death Egypt said Wednesday that the U.N. human rights office was trying to politicize the death of former Egyptian president Mohammed Morsi, who collapsed inside a Cairo courtroom during his trial this week. Morsi, Egypt's first democratically elected president who hailed from the now outlawed Muslim Brotherhood group, was buried under heavy security early on Tuesday, a day after his dramatic collapse and death inside a Cairo courtroom. Rupert Colville, spokesman for the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights, called Tuesday for a "prompt, impartial, thorough and transparent investigation" into Morsi's death on Monday.


BMW adds a Gran Coupe to the 8 Series lineup

BMW adds a Gran Coupe to the 8 Series lineup BMW has revealed that the 8 Series lineup is gaining another member and one that's bigger than any other model in the segment: the 2020 8 Series Gran Coupe. A new model was added Wednesday to the BMW 8 Series family and it's one that tops the segment. The four-door 2020 8 Series Gran Coupe is not only longer, taller, and provides more interior space than its Coupe counterpart, but it's also available in three variations.


12 Designs We Need From Wayfair’s Super Affordable New Collection

12 Designs We Need From Wayfair’s Super Affordable New Collection

UPDATE 2-Harley-Davidson strikes deal to build smaller bike in China

UPDATE 2-Harley-Davidson strikes deal to build smaller bike in China Harley-Davidson Inc will partner with China's Qianjiang Motorcycle Co to build a new smaller motorcycle than its trademark "big hogs", making good on promises to move more production outside the United States that have angered President Donald Trump. Trump last year threatened to impose higher taxes on Harley after it made plans to move production for European customers overseas, part of a longer-term strategy for dealing with lower sales in the U.S. and higher costs because of trade tariffs. The partnership Harley outlined on Wednesday is aimed both at taking a bigger chunk of China's huge bike and moped market, while also fitting in with a plan to cut costs and source half of all sales outside the United States by 2027.


Israel holds large military drill amid US-Iran tensions

Israel holds large military drill amid US-Iran tensions Israel wrapped up its largest military drill in years on Wednesday, with thousands of troops from the army, navy and air force simulating a future war with the militant Lebanese Hezbollah group amid fears that Iran would draw its Shiite proxy into the recent growing tensions in the Persian Gulf. The Israeli military said the four-day exercise had been planned long in advance and focused on the immersion of all branches against threats emanating from Israel's north. It included a large deployment of unmanned aircraft and the first use of the F-35 stealth fighter planes to prepare for scenarios of missile attacks and underground infiltrations from Lebanon.


Israel holds large military drill amid US-Iran tensions

Israel holds large military drill amid US-Iran tensions Israel wrapped up its largest military drill in years on Wednesday, with thousands of troops from the army, navy and air force simulating a future war with the militant Lebanese Hezbollah group amid fears that Iran would draw its Shiite proxy into the recent growing tensions in the Persian Gulf. The Israeli military said the four-day exercise had been planned long in advance and focused on the immersion of all branches against threats emanating from Israel's north. It included a large deployment of unmanned aircraft and the first use of the F-35 stealth fighter planes to prepare for scenarios of missile attacks and underground infiltrations from Lebanon.


Trump Deportations to Start With Migrants Who Defy Court Orders

Trump Deportations to Start With Migrants Who Defy Court Orders (Bloomberg) -- President Donald Trump’s plan to begin deporting “millions” of undocumented immigrants as soon as next week will start with people who have defied final deportation orders, acting Immigration, Customs and Enforcement Director Mark Morgan said Wednesday.Morgan told Fox News that the process would begin with those who have had previous access to a lawyer and a court hearing but haven’t complied with the final edict. ICE will help people who voluntarily comply execute an “ordered, dignified” exit from the U.S., he said. “We have a demographic that has had an enormous amount of due process,” Morgan said. “We’re not going to exempt any demographic.”The president’s announcement of the plan earlier this week was seen as a signal he may be opening a new front in his war on immigration ahead of his formal his re-election campaign kickoff last night. Trump said in a Monday tweet that ICE would begin removing migrants “as fast as they come in” but didn’t provide details about what the new initiative would entail. Morgan said Wednesday that the operation will focus on those who have been issued final deportation orders by federal judges but remain in the country.The president has been focusing on undocumented immigrants -- one of his signature issues -- in recent weeks as he tries to make the case that voters should re-elect him in 2020.Morgan said told CNN earlier this month that the new ICE effort could prove a disincentive for migrant families currently traveling to the U.S. who count on legal limits on the time children can be held in government custody to secure release into the country.Trump is eager to demonstrate that he’s taking a hard line on immigration as he increasingly focuses on his re-election campaign, which he’s set to launch Tuesday night in Orlando, Florida.In 2016, Trump won the White House with a populist message and promises to build a wall and stop flows of illegal immigration. But the president has struggled to secure congressional support for construction of his signature border barrier, and migration flows have surged in recent months as migrant families from Central America pour into the country from Mexico.The campaign of Kamala Harris, a senator from California seeking the Democratic nomination to oppose Trump in the general election, said Trump’s tweet is evidence he wants “to rid our country of ethnic and racial groups he doesn’t like.”“History has shown us what happens when governments begin mass roundups based on ethnic background or national origin,” Harris campaign manager Juan Rodriguez said in a statement.Earlier this month, Trump threatened to impose new tariffs on Mexico if the country didn’t stem those migrant flows. The U.S. ultimately relented after the Mexican government agreed to step up internal immigration enforcement efforts.The administration has also requested $4.5 billion in emergency funds that would help address the surge of migrants at the border but not be used for wall construction.To contact the reporters on this story: Justin Sink in WASHINGTON at jsink1@bloomberg.net;Terrence Dopp in Washington at tdopp@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Alex Wayne at awayne3@bloomberg.net, Elizabeth Wasserman, Kathleen HunterFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


New study to examine feeding habits of Cape Cod great whites

New study to examine feeding habits of Cape Cod great whites Researchers on Cape Cod are launching a new study focused on the hunting and feeding habits of the region's great white sharks following last year's two attacks on humans, including the state's first fatal one in more than 80 years. The hope is that the work, which starts in the coming days, contributes critical information to the ongoing debate over how to keep Cape beachgoers safe, said state marine biologist Greg Skomal, who has been studying the region's great whites for years and is leading the new effort. Cape Cod officials have been wrestling with how to respond to public concern in the aftermath of last year's attacks.


Russia, China, block US effort to halt North Korea fuel deliveries

Russia, China, block US effort to halt North Korea fuel deliveries Russia and China on Tuesday blocked an American initiative that aimed to halt fuel deliveries to North Korea, which Washington accuses of exceeding its annual ceiling for 2019, diplomatic sources said. Moscow and Beijing said more time was needed to study the US request, which was backed by 25 UN members including Japan, France and Germany, according to the sources. A week ago, the United States, in a report, accused North Korea of breaching the United Nations-imposed ceiling on fuel imports by carrying out dozens of ship-to-ship transfers.


Warren emerges as potential compromise nominee

Warren emerges as potential compromise nominee Centrists who once said the senator would lead the party to ruin are coming around to her as an alternative to Bernie Sanders.


This holiday could fizzle if the US-China trade war blows up

This holiday could fizzle if the US-China trade war blows up More tariffs on China could raise fireworks prices, hitting next year's Fourth of July displays, and the small businesses and jobs tied to them.


Xiaomi Eyes $725 Million Expansion to Stave Off Huawei in China

Xiaomi Eyes $725 Million Expansion to Stave Off Huawei in China (Bloomberg) -- Xiaomi Corp. aims to spend an additional 5 billion yuan ($725 million) expanding its Chinese retail network over the next three years, anticipating a re-doubled effort by Huawei Technologies Co. to grow its domestic market share.The smartphone maker will spend the money on expanding distribution channels and on reward programs for its partners and sales employees, a person familiar with the matter said, citing an internal meeting convened by billionaire co-founder Lei Jun Tuesday. That spending comes on top of an existing budget for building up its retail operations. Chinese media outlet Caixin reported on the investment earlier.Huawei is said to be preparing for a drop in international smartphone shipments of 40% to 60% as the Trump administration bars its access to American components and software. That means Google will cut off popular apps like YouTube and stop providing updates for the Android system that powers all of Huawei’s devices abroad. It wants to grab as much as half of the smartphone market in China in 2019 to offset that decline overseas, people familiar with the matter have said, citing internal discussions about year-end goals. It hopes to get there also by investing in marketing and expanding distribution channels.Xiaomi aims to become the country’s top vendor but its priority is to at least become No. 3, the person said, asking not to be identified discussing internal goals. The company currently ranks fourth. It sees the roll-out of next-generation 5G mobile networks in coming years as a golden opportunity to boost sales on its home turf, the person added.Hong Kong-listed Xiaomi now commands about 12% of the Chinese smartphone market versus Huawei’s 34%, Canalys estimates. Its shipments slid 13% in the first quarter while its rivals’ soared 41%, the research outfit estimated.To contact Bloomberg News staff for this story: Gao Yuan in Beijing at ygao199@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Peter Elstrom at pelstrom@bloomberg.net, Edwin Chan, Colum MurphyFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


Xiaomi Eyes $725 Million Expansion to Stave Off Huawei in China

Xiaomi Eyes $725 Million Expansion to Stave Off Huawei in China (Bloomberg) -- Xiaomi Corp. aims to spend an additional 5 billion yuan ($725 million) expanding its Chinese retail network over the next three years, anticipating a re-doubled effort by Huawei Technologies Co. to grow its domestic market share.The smartphone maker will spend the money on expanding distribution channels and on reward programs for its partners and sales employees, a person familiar with the matter said, citing an internal meeting convened by billionaire co-founder Lei Jun Tuesday. That spending comes on top of an existing budget for building up its retail operations. Chinese media outlet Caixin reported on the investment earlier.Huawei is said to be preparing for a drop in international smartphone shipments of 40% to 60% as the Trump administration bars its access to American components and software. That means Google will cut off popular apps like YouTube and stop providing updates for the Android system that powers all of Huawei’s devices abroad. It wants to grab as much as half of the smartphone market in China in 2019 to offset that decline overseas, people familiar with the matter have said, citing internal discussions about year-end goals. It hopes to get there also by investing in marketing and expanding distribution channels.Xiaomi aims to become the country’s top vendor but its priority is to at least become No. 3, the person said, asking not to be identified discussing internal goals. The company currently ranks fourth. It sees the roll-out of next-generation 5G mobile networks in coming years as a golden opportunity to boost sales on its home turf, the person added.Hong Kong-listed Xiaomi now commands about 12% of the Chinese smartphone market versus Huawei’s 34%, Canalys estimates. Its shipments slid 13% in the first quarter while its rivals’ soared 41%, the research outfit estimated.To contact Bloomberg News staff for this story: Gao Yuan in Beijing at ygao199@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Peter Elstrom at pelstrom@bloomberg.net, Edwin Chan, Colum MurphyFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


Staff evacuated as rocket strikes near foreign oil firms in Iraq

Staff evacuated as rocket strikes near foreign oil firms in Iraq A rocket hit a site in southern Iraq used by foreign oil companies on Wednesday, including U.S. energy giant ExxonMobil, wounding three people and threatening to further escalate U.S.-Iran tensions in the region. There was no immediate claim of responsibility for the attack near Iraq's southern city of Basra, the fourth time in a week that rockets have struck near U.S. installations. Three previous attacks on or near military bases housing U.S. forces near Baghdad and Mosul caused no casualties or major damage.


Staff evacuated as rocket strikes near foreign oil firms in Iraq

Staff evacuated as rocket strikes near foreign oil firms in Iraq A rocket hit a site in southern Iraq used by foreign oil companies on Wednesday, including U.S. energy giant ExxonMobil, wounding three people and threatening to further escalate U.S.-Iran tensions in the region. There was no immediate claim of responsibility for the attack near Iraq's southern city of Basra, the fourth time in a week that rockets have struck near U.S. installations. Three previous attacks on or near military bases housing U.S. forces near Baghdad and Mosul caused no casualties or major damage.


Staff evacuated as rocket strikes near foreign oil firms in Iraq

Staff evacuated as rocket strikes near foreign oil firms in Iraq A rocket hit a site in southern Iraq used by foreign oil companies on Wednesday, including U.S. energy giant ExxonMobil, wounding three people and threatening to further escalate U.S.-Iran tensions in the region. There was no immediate claim of responsibility for the attack near Iraq's southern city of Basra, the fourth time in a week that rockets have struck near U.S. installations. Three previous attacks on or near military bases housing U.S. forces near Baghdad and Mosul caused no casualties or major damage.


Mars has a brand new crater, and it sure is pretty

Mars has a brand new crater, and it sure is pretty Mars, like any other rocky world, has its fair share of craters. These scars of ancient impacts give the dusty surface of the planet some serious personality, and sometimes it's easy to forget that new craters can happen right before our eyes. That's exactly what seems to have occurred, and a new image from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter reveals a brand new impact site that might only be a few months old.The image, which was captured by the HiRISE camera built into the orbiter, shows a bold dark patch of material surrounding a circular crater on the Martian surface. Researchers believe it might have been created as recently as February 2019.The University of Arizona posted the photo, along with the following caption:> An impressionist painting? No, it's a new impact crater that has appeared on the surface of Mars, formed at most between September 2016 and February 2019. What makes this stand out is the darker material exposed beneath the reddish dust.The photo itself was captured in April and is only just now getting the attention it deserves. However, because the orbiter can't be looking at the entire planet at all times, it's unclear when exactly the crater formed, and researchers can only narrow it down to sometime between September 2016 and February 2019.This is yet another great reminder of the fantastic work NASA's Mars orbiter has been doing for years now. The spacecraft originally launched way back in 2005 and arrived at Mars in March of the following year. When it did, its primary mission was only scheduled to last for two years, but it has since put in over 13 years of faithful service for scientists. As long as it keeps producing images like this one, we hope it keeps going for a long time to come.


Mars has a brand new crater, and it sure is pretty

Mars has a brand new crater, and it sure is pretty Mars, like any other rocky world, has its fair share of craters. These scars of ancient impacts give the dusty surface of the planet some serious personality, and sometimes it's easy to forget that new craters can happen right before our eyes. That's exactly what seems to have occurred, and a new image from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter reveals a brand new impact site that might only be a few months old.The image, which was captured by the HiRISE camera built into the orbiter, shows a bold dark patch of material surrounding a circular crater on the Martian surface. Researchers believe it might have been created as recently as February 2019.The University of Arizona posted the photo, along with the following caption:> An impressionist painting? No, it's a new impact crater that has appeared on the surface of Mars, formed at most between September 2016 and February 2019. What makes this stand out is the darker material exposed beneath the reddish dust.The photo itself was captured in April and is only just now getting the attention it deserves. However, because the orbiter can't be looking at the entire planet at all times, it's unclear when exactly the crater formed, and researchers can only narrow it down to sometime between September 2016 and February 2019.This is yet another great reminder of the fantastic work NASA's Mars orbiter has been doing for years now. The spacecraft originally launched way back in 2005 and arrived at Mars in March of the following year. When it did, its primary mission was only scheduled to last for two years, but it has since put in over 13 years of faithful service for scientists. As long as it keeps producing images like this one, we hope it keeps going for a long time to come.


Mars has a brand new crater, and it sure is pretty

Mars has a brand new crater, and it sure is pretty Mars, like any other rocky world, has its fair share of craters. These scars of ancient impacts give the dusty surface of the planet some serious personality, and sometimes it's easy to forget that new craters can happen right before our eyes. That's exactly what seems to have occurred, and a new image from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter reveals a brand new impact site that might only be a few months old.The image, which was captured by the HiRISE camera built into the orbiter, shows a bold dark patch of material surrounding a circular crater on the Martian surface. Researchers believe it might have been created as recently as February 2019.The University of Arizona posted the photo, along with the following caption:> An impressionist painting? No, it's a new impact crater that has appeared on the surface of Mars, formed at most between September 2016 and February 2019. What makes this stand out is the darker material exposed beneath the reddish dust.The photo itself was captured in April and is only just now getting the attention it deserves. However, because the orbiter can't be looking at the entire planet at all times, it's unclear when exactly the crater formed, and researchers can only narrow it down to sometime between September 2016 and February 2019.This is yet another great reminder of the fantastic work NASA's Mars orbiter has been doing for years now. The spacecraft originally launched way back in 2005 and arrived at Mars in March of the following year. When it did, its primary mission was only scheduled to last for two years, but it has since put in over 13 years of faithful service for scientists. As long as it keeps producing images like this one, we hope it keeps going for a long time to come.


Trump's 2020 campaign launch: the key takeaways

Trump's 2020 campaign launch: the key takeaways After two and a half years in office, Trump remains fixated on the same grievances – and successesDonald Trump launched his 2016 presidential campaign on 16 June 2015, by descending an escalator in front of a small crowd in Trump Tower. Four years on, he launched his 2020 pitch to be re-elected to the White House to 20,000 people at Orlando’s Amway Center on a humid, rainy Florida night.Trump is bidding for a second term at a time when the economy is doing well and unemployment is at its lowest rate for half a century. But he heads into the campaign as a historically unpopular president beset by scandal and having shattered many presidential norms. Just 42.5% of Americans approve of Trump’s performance, while 53.1% disapprove.Here are the key takeaways: Socialism will be front and center in 2020Mike Pence introduced Trump, and the vice-president used his speech to hammer away at the Democrats, repeatedly accusing them of being “socialists”.“It was freedom, not socialism, that ended slavery [and] won two wars,” Pence said. Make of that what you will, but it’s a line that Republicans seem determined to hammer home as they seek to paint Democrats as unhinged and even vaguely communist. In his own speech, Trump said Americans don’t believe in socialism, “they believe in freedom”. We’ll be hearing that false equivalence a lot on the road to November 2020. A big crowd in Orlando … but early departuresTrump had said he would fill the Amway Center, which has a capacity of a little under 20,000, and fill it he did. The crowd cheered wildly when he emerged, and his largest applause lines – criticizing the press, making false claims about wall-building – got big cheers. But Trump spoke for almost an hour and a half, and well before then some people began to trickle out. It would be unwise to read too much into the early departures – it was a long, hot day all round – but for a president whose strength comes from personal magnetism, seeing people leave early isn’t a great sign. Trump has no plans to turn forward the clockMuch of this speech could have been given two years ago – and some parts four years ago. Launching his re-election campaign in theory gave Trump a chance for a fresh start, and to set new goals for a second term. Instead he seemed happiest when he was discussing Hillary Clinton’s emails – inspiring the “Lock her up!” chant – and talking about his 2016 victory. The address showed that after two and a half years in office, Trump remains fixated on his same grievances – and successes. It’s the economy …Trump’s touting of the economy’s success brought big cheers and by most measures, the US economy is doing well. Unemployment is low, and GDP growth – seen as one of the best indicators of an economy’s health – is high. Of course, Trump being Trump, when he did discuss the economy, he falsely claimed the US has the lowest unemployment rate in the history of the country and exaggerated GDP growth. But Trump also got sidetracked from talking up his economic successes (whether they are attributable to him or not), and reverted to common applause lines and attacks. All the warm-up speakers before Trump focused on the economy, and Trump’s campaign strategists would probably prefer him to do the same. Immigration will remain an issue The president attacked Democrats as “unhinged” and blamed their inaction for the situation at the border, claiming that undocumented immigrants are “pouring in”. He also attacked Democrats over sanctuary cities and – as one would expect – brought up the border wall, claiming 400 miles of it will be built by the end of next year. The problem is most of that is only going to replacing existing wall. But will his supporters care? Trump will also run against the mediaTheir names might not be on any ballot but it was clear that Trump intends to run against America’s journalists and media organizations as much as any Democrat. He once again singled out the press pen in the middle of the stadium, pointing them out to the crowd, who roundly booed them and chanted “CNN sucks”.“That is a lot of fake news back there,” Trump said


Trump to Florida Rally Crowd: Democrats ‘Want to Destroy You’

Trump to Florida Rally Crowd: Democrats ‘Want to Destroy You’ President Trump officially “kicked off” his 2020 re-election campaign in Orlando, Florida on Tuesday night by telling a crowd of riled up supporters that Democrats are hell-bent on “destroying” them. “The Democrats don’t care about Russia,” the president growled. “They only care about their own political power. They went after my family, my business, my finances, my employees, almost everyone that I have ever known or worked with, but they are really going after you!”Asserting that the Russia investigation was really about erasing the votes of his supporters, Trump claimed it was all an attempt to erase the “legacy of the greatest campaign and the greatest election probably in the history of our country.”“And they wanted to deny you the future that you demanded and the future that America deserves and that now America is getting,” he added.After soaking in some more cheers from the audience, the president said his “radical Democrat opponents are driven by hatred, prejudice and rage” before turning up the inflammatory rhetoric.“They want to destroy you and they want to destroy our country as we know it,” Trump snarled. “Not acceptable. It’s not going to happen!”His supporters, meanwhile, lapped it up, exploding in applause.Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.


NASA’s asteroid probe snapped its closest photo yet of space rock Bennu

NASA’s asteroid probe snapped its closest photo yet of space rock Bennu NASA's OSIRIS-REx asteroid probe is giving scientists an even better look at the surface of the space rock known as Bennu now that it's moved even closer to the object. A new photo posted by the partnership between NASA and the University of Arizona gives us what might be our most detailed glimpse yet at the rock.The spacecraft has been hanging around Bennu for several months now, and will continue to do so for several more. Its new orbit, which its handlers call the Orbital B phase, brings it within a half mile of Bennu's surface, and this new photo shows us exactly what it sees as it orbits.The photo, which was posted to NASA's OSIRIS-REx web portal, comes with the following caption:> This image of asteroid Bennu was captured on Jun. 13, 2019, shortly after NASA's OSIRIS-REx spacecraft executed its second orbital insertion maneuver. From the spacecraft's vantage point in orbit, half of Bennu is sunlit and half is in shadow. Bennu's largest boulder can also be seen protruding from the southern hemisphere.The OSIRIS-REx team goes on to explain that, due to the incredibly short distance between the spacecraft and the asteroid, details "as small as 1.6 feet across" can be seen in the full-resolution image (available here).Getting a detailed look at Bennu's surface is about more than just capturing some fancy space eye candy. NASA has to know what every inch of the rock looks like in order to choose the best possible location for an eventual touchdown.Eventually, the probe will set down briefly on Bennu in order to snag a sample of its material for return to Earth. The asteroid is absolutely covered in debris, however, posing a serious challenge. In the months ahead, scientists will come up with a short list of possible landing locations and then narrow it down, and observations like this one will help them make their decision.


NASA’s asteroid probe snapped its closest photo yet of space rock Bennu

NASA’s asteroid probe snapped its closest photo yet of space rock Bennu NASA's OSIRIS-REx asteroid probe is giving scientists an even better look at the surface of the space rock known as Bennu now that it's moved even closer to the object. A new photo posted by the partnership between NASA and the University of Arizona gives us what might be our most detailed glimpse yet at the rock.The spacecraft has been hanging around Bennu for several months now, and will continue to do so for several more. Its new orbit, which its handlers call the Orbital B phase, brings it within a half mile of Bennu's surface, and this new photo shows us exactly what it sees as it orbits.The photo, which was posted to NASA's OSIRIS-REx web portal, comes with the following caption:> This image of asteroid Bennu was captured on Jun. 13, 2019, shortly after NASA's OSIRIS-REx spacecraft executed its second orbital insertion maneuver. From the spacecraft's vantage point in orbit, half of Bennu is sunlit and half is in shadow. Bennu's largest boulder can also be seen protruding from the southern hemisphere.The OSIRIS-REx team goes on to explain that, due to the incredibly short distance between the spacecraft and the asteroid, details "as small as 1.6 feet across" can be seen in the full-resolution image (available here).Getting a detailed look at Bennu's surface is about more than just capturing some fancy space eye candy. NASA has to know what every inch of the rock looks like in order to choose the best possible location for an eventual touchdown.Eventually, the probe will set down briefly on Bennu in order to snag a sample of its material for return to Earth. The asteroid is absolutely covered in debris, however, posing a serious challenge. In the months ahead, scientists will come up with a short list of possible landing locations and then narrow it down, and observations like this one will help them make their decision.


NASA’s asteroid probe snapped its closest photo yet of space rock Bennu

NASA’s asteroid probe snapped its closest photo yet of space rock Bennu NASA's OSIRIS-REx asteroid probe is giving scientists an even better look at the surface of the space rock known as Bennu now that it's moved even closer to the object. A new photo posted by the partnership between NASA and the University of Arizona gives us what might be our most detailed glimpse yet at the rock.The spacecraft has been hanging around Bennu for several months now, and will continue to do so for several more. Its new orbit, which its handlers call the Orbital B phase, brings it within a half mile of Bennu's surface, and this new photo shows us exactly what it sees as it orbits.The photo, which was posted to NASA's OSIRIS-REx web portal, comes with the following caption:> This image of asteroid Bennu was captured on Jun. 13, 2019, shortly after NASA's OSIRIS-REx spacecraft executed its second orbital insertion maneuver. From the spacecraft's vantage point in orbit, half of Bennu is sunlit and half is in shadow. Bennu's largest boulder can also be seen protruding from the southern hemisphere.The OSIRIS-REx team goes on to explain that, due to the incredibly short distance between the spacecraft and the asteroid, details "as small as 1.6 feet across" can be seen in the full-resolution image (available here).Getting a detailed look at Bennu's surface is about more than just capturing some fancy space eye candy. NASA has to know what every inch of the rock looks like in order to choose the best possible location for an eventual touchdown.Eventually, the probe will set down briefly on Bennu in order to snag a sample of its material for return to Earth. The asteroid is absolutely covered in debris, however, posing a serious challenge. In the months ahead, scientists will come up with a short list of possible landing locations and then narrow it down, and observations like this one will help them make their decision.


Trump's Pentagon nominee quits, Iran targets CIA network

Trump's Pentagon nominee quits, Iran targets CIA network President Donald Trump lost his nominee for Pentagon chief on Tuesday, adding to the volatility in a tense standoff with Iran, which claimed to have dismantled a CIA network. Foreign powers are watching the situation in the Mideast with growing concern as Tehran and Washington exchange warnings about an escalation in their conflict. Trump announced on Twitter that Patrick Shanahan was quitting to spend time with his family.


Xi firmly backs Pyongyang's effort to solve Korea Peninsula issues: Rodong Sinmun

Xi firmly backs Pyongyang's effort to solve Korea Peninsula issues: Rodong Sinmun Chinese President Xi Jinping said in an op-ed in North Korean state newspaper Rodong Sinmun on Wednesday that China supports North Korea's "correct direction" in politically resolving issues on the Korean Peninsula. The front-page op-ed is an honor rarely granted to foreign leaders and comes a day before Xi is set to visit Pyongyang on Thursday and Friday at the invitation of North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, making him the first Chinese leader to visit in 14 years. The visit is a sorely needed show of support for Kim, whose campaign of diplomatic outreach and drive to rebuild the economy has suffered since the collapse of the Hanoi summit between North Korea's Kim and U.S. President Donald Trump in February.


The House Hearing on Slavery Reparations Is Part of a Long History. Here's What to Know on the Idea's Tireless Early Advocates

The House Hearing on Slavery Reparations Is Part of a Long History. Here's What to Know on the Idea's Tireless Early Advocates The new round of hearings is scheduled to take place on Juneteenth


Watch as a Model 3 is transformed into the first Tesla pickup truck

Watch as a Model 3 is transformed into the first Tesla pickup truck For all of the hoopla surrounding Elon Musk's online antics and Tesla's ongoing struggles to ramp up Model 3 production, it's easy to overlook just how far the company has come in a relatively short period of time. In less than seven years time, Tesla managed to roll out the award-winning Model S, followed of course by the Model Y and the Model 3. It's worth noting that Tesla, during this seven-year period, has seen its deliveries and overall manufacturing figures skyrocket. As a prime example, Tesla during the first quarter of 2018 manufactured 34,494 vehicles. During the first quarter of 2019, just one year later, that figure jumped to 77,100 vehicles. All the while, Tesla has no plans of slowing down. Over the next few years, the company has plans to release a crossover version of the Model 3, a Tesla semi-truck, a next-gen Roadster, and last but not least, an electric pickup truck. Tesla's pickup truck plan is particularly intriguing given how popular pickup trucks are in the United States. Over the past few months, Musk has teased Tesla's somewhat mysterious pickup truck, noting that it will boast "incredible functionally from a load carrying standpoint" and that it will look more like a sci-fi truck than a traditional pickup truck. "That means that it’s not going to be for everyone," Musk said a few weeks ago, "like if somebody just wants to have a truck that looks like trucks have looked like for the last 20 to 40 years, it probably isn’t for them." With no definite timeline regarding a release date, or even an unveiling, an enterprising Model 3 owner and robotics enthusiast named Simone Giertz recently decided that she couldn't wait for Tesla to get around to releasing a pickup truck. So instead, she created one on her own out of a Model 3. The entire process was documented on YouTube and it's quite fascinating. "I don't know if this going to be the smartest or the most stupid thing I'm ever gonna do, but the bottom line is  I really want an electric pickup truck and more specifically I want a Tesla pickup," Giertz explains. Suffice it to say, the entire process was quite involved and not exactly straight forward. But after a lot of engineering and planning, the first Tesla pickup truck was borne into existence. It's not the most aesthetically pleasing design, but it's still quite an impressive achievement: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jKv_N0IDS2A She even went so far as to make a commercial for the fictional "Truckla" she designed: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R35gWBtLCYg


Watch as a Model 3 is transformed into the first Tesla pickup truck

Watch as a Model 3 is transformed into the first Tesla pickup truck For all of the hoopla surrounding Elon Musk's online antics and Tesla's ongoing struggles to ramp up Model 3 production, it's easy to overlook just how far the company has come in a relatively short period of time. In less than seven years time, Tesla managed to roll out the award-winning Model S, followed of course by the Model Y and the Model 3. It's worth noting that Tesla, during this seven-year period, has seen its deliveries and overall manufacturing figures skyrocket. As a prime example, Tesla during the first quarter of 2018 manufactured 34,494 vehicles. During the first quarter of 2019, just one year later, that figure jumped to 77,100 vehicles. All the while, Tesla has no plans of slowing down. Over the next few years, the company has plans to release a crossover version of the Model 3, a Tesla semi-truck, a next-gen Roadster, and last but not least, an electric pickup truck. Tesla's pickup truck plan is particularly intriguing given how popular pickup trucks are in the United States. Over the past few months, Musk has teased Tesla's somewhat mysterious pickup truck, noting that it will boast "incredible functionally from a load carrying standpoint" and that it will look more like a sci-fi truck than a traditional pickup truck. "That means that it’s not going to be for everyone," Musk said a few weeks ago, "like if somebody just wants to have a truck that looks like trucks have looked like for the last 20 to 40 years, it probably isn’t for them." With no definite timeline regarding a release date, or even an unveiling, an enterprising Model 3 owner and robotics enthusiast named Simone Giertz recently decided that she couldn't wait for Tesla to get around to releasing a pickup truck. So instead, she created one on her own out of a Model 3. The entire process was documented on YouTube and it's quite fascinating. "I don't know if this going to be the smartest or the most stupid thing I'm ever gonna do, but the bottom line is  I really want an electric pickup truck and more specifically I want a Tesla pickup," Giertz explains. Suffice it to say, the entire process was quite involved and not exactly straight forward. But after a lot of engineering and planning, the first Tesla pickup truck was borne into existence. It's not the most aesthetically pleasing design, but it's still quite an impressive achievement: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jKv_N0IDS2A She even went so far as to make a commercial for the fictional "Truckla" she designed: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R35gWBtLCYg


Watch as a Model 3 is transformed into the first Tesla pickup truck

Watch as a Model 3 is transformed into the first Tesla pickup truck For all of the hoopla surrounding Elon Musk's online antics and Tesla's ongoing struggles to ramp up Model 3 production, it's easy to overlook just how far the company has come in a relatively short period of time. In less than seven years time, Tesla managed to roll out the award-winning Model S, followed of course by the Model Y and the Model 3. It's worth noting that Tesla, during this seven-year period, has seen its deliveries and overall manufacturing figures skyrocket. As a prime example, Tesla during the first quarter of 2018 manufactured 34,494 vehicles. During the first quarter of 2019, just one year later, that figure jumped to 77,100 vehicles. All the while, Tesla has no plans of slowing down. Over the next few years, the company has plans to release a crossover version of the Model 3, a Tesla semi-truck, a next-gen Roadster, and last but not least, an electric pickup truck. Tesla's pickup truck plan is particularly intriguing given how popular pickup trucks are in the United States. Over the past few months, Musk has teased Tesla's somewhat mysterious pickup truck, noting that it will boast "incredible functionally from a load carrying standpoint" and that it will look more like a sci-fi truck than a traditional pickup truck. "That means that it’s not going to be for everyone," Musk said a few weeks ago, "like if somebody just wants to have a truck that looks like trucks have looked like for the last 20 to 40 years, it probably isn’t for them." With no definite timeline regarding a release date, or even an unveiling, an enterprising Model 3 owner and robotics enthusiast named Simone Giertz recently decided that she couldn't wait for Tesla to get around to releasing a pickup truck. So instead, she created one on her own out of a Model 3. The entire process was documented on YouTube and it's quite fascinating. "I don't know if this going to be the smartest or the most stupid thing I'm ever gonna do, but the bottom line is  I really want an electric pickup truck and more specifically I want a Tesla pickup," Giertz explains. Suffice it to say, the entire process was quite involved and not exactly straight forward. But after a lot of engineering and planning, the first Tesla pickup truck was borne into existence. It's not the most aesthetically pleasing design, but it's still quite an impressive achievement: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jKv_N0IDS2A She even went so far as to make a commercial for the fictional "Truckla" she designed: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R35gWBtLCYg


Trump's acting defence secretary Patrick Shanahan withdraws amid family's domestic violence incidents

Trump's acting defence secretary Patrick Shanahan withdraws amid family's domestic violence incidents Donald Trump's acting defence secretary has withdrawn from consideration after a series of domestic violence incidents within his family came to light.  The US president announced on Tuesday that Patrick Shanahan, 56, had "decided not to go forward with his confirmation process" to lead the Pentagon permanently.  Mr Trump said the army secretary, Mark Esper, will come in as acting secretary of defence. The post has been vacant since James Mattis resigned in December over Mr Trump's sudden decision to remove US troops from Syria. The new upheaval leaves the Pentagon without a permanent leader at a time of rising tensions in the Middle East, with America accusing Iran of attacking oil tankers in the strategic Gulf of Oman. Mr Shanahan's nomination process in the Senate had been delayed  by an FBI background check because of the details surrounding his divorce, including a 2010 claim by his ex-wife that he punched her in the stomach.   James Mattis resigned from the role in December Credit: AP A spokesman for Mr Shanahan said that his ex-wife, who now goes by Kimberley Jordinson, started the fight and it was she who was arrested and charged with domestic violence. Court documents also revealed that Mr Shanahan's 17-year-old son William repeatedly beat his mother with a baseball bat in 2011, leaving her in hospital with a fractured skull and elbow. Two weeks later, Mr Shanahan stated in a note to his ex-wife's brother that his son had acted in self-defence. “Use of a baseball bat in self-defense will likely be viewed as an imbalance of force,” he wrote. “However, Will’s mother harassed him for nearly three hours before the incident.”   In an interview with The Washington Post published on Tuesday, Mr Shanahan said that “bad things can happen to good families” and said he feared the publicity “will ruin my son’s life.” He also said he regretted writing the memo suggesting there could be any justification for an assault with a baseball bat. Ms Jordinson maintained in a recent interview that Mr Shanahan had hit her in 2010 as the pair struggled over a briefcase.  ....I thank Pat for his outstanding service and will be naming Secretary of the Army, Mark Esper, to be the new Acting Secretary of Defense. I know Mark, and have no doubt he will do a fantastic job!— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) June 18, 2019 However officers who were called to the family home concluded that Ms Jordinson, not Mr Shanahan, had been the attacker. Police said they could find no injuries on Ms Jordinson, but Mr Shanahan was sporting a bloody nose and his wife “appeared to be intoxicated” and had “blood stains” on her right forearm.  She was later arrested on a domestic assault charge but prosecutors dropped the case the next year because of a lack of evidence.   At the time, the couple's son William submitted a statement to his mother's lawyer stating that she called him for help during the struggle. But this week he told USA Today that his mother “coerced” him to sign the document meant to assist her defence. “I did what she told me,” he said.   During her divorce Ms Jordinson was diagnosed with borderline personality disorder, and police records show there have been ongoing concerns about her mental stability when officers have responded to multiple calls from her home.  Details of the incidents have started to emerge in US media reports about Mr Shanahan's nomination process.  The former Boeing executive has been leading the Pentagon as acting secretary since January 1 despite having very little experience in government, a highly unusual arrangement for one of the most sensitive Cabinet positions. In more than four months as the acting secretary, he focused on a shift from the resources and tactics required to fight small wars against extremist groups to what Mr Shanahan calls "great power" competition with China and Russia.  Addressing his withdrawal, he said: "I believe my continuing in the confirmation process would force my three children to relive a traumatic chapter in our family's life."


The Latest: 2 charged in huge cocaine bust at Philly port

The Latest: 2 charged in huge cocaine bust at Philly port Two members of a container ship's crew face federal drug charges after agents raided their vessel at a Philadelphia port and seized about 33,000 pounds (15,000 kilograms) of cocaine. Court documents filed Tuesday charge Ivan Durasevic and Fonofaavae Tiasage with conspiracy to possess cocaine aboard a ship subject to U.S. jurisdiction.


The Latest: 2 charged in huge cocaine bust at Philly port

The Latest: 2 charged in huge cocaine bust at Philly port Two members of a container ship's crew face federal drug charges after agents raided their vessel at a Philadelphia port and seized about 33,000 pounds (15,000 kilograms) of cocaine. Court documents filed Tuesday charge Ivan Durasevic and Fonofaavae Tiasage with conspiracy to possess cocaine aboard a ship subject to U.S. jurisdiction.


The Latest: 2 charged in huge cocaine bust at Philly port

The Latest: 2 charged in huge cocaine bust at Philly port Two members of a container ship's crew face federal drug charges after agents raided their vessel at a Philadelphia port and seized about 33,000 pounds (15,000 kilograms) of cocaine. Court documents filed Tuesday charge Ivan Durasevic and Fonofaavae Tiasage with conspiracy to possess cocaine aboard a ship subject to U.S. jurisdiction.


100 days of silence: How Trump may have damaged the role of White House press secretary for good

100 days of silence: How Trump may have damaged the role of White House press secretary for good For any president, 100-day milestones are important. An administration with fresh impetus can achieve more during the first three months in the White House than at any other time.But Donald Trump has hit an altogether more unwanted 100 mark, one that has vast implications for the press, the public and his own officials. We are now into the 100th day since the last formal daily briefing by the White House press secretary.On-camera briefings began in 1995 and Trump’s administration already held the record for most days without one – set at 42, before the last briefing on 11 March.That one ended with press secretary Sarah Sanders taking questions for a mere 14 minutes, something that Joe Lockhart, Bill Clinton’s White House press secretary from 1998 to 2000, says shows the Trump administration’s “abdication” of its duty to the country.“The press secretary is the one person in the building that on a daily basis knows they work for the public,” Lockhart says. “[You] go out there every day and answer hard questions or rude questions because the public have a right to know and it is a big part of how our democratic system is supposed to work.“This White House has just abdicated that responsibility”.With Sarah Sanders having resigned her position, what now for a job that has become much-maligned? Even if the position has been integral to the White House since it was created in 1929, Lockhart worries that Mr Trump has set a precedent that others could follow.“I think the role has really suffered a lot of damage,” he says. It is certainly easier for the White House not to do the briefings because it leaves someone exposed there every day. “Politics is a game of imitation – whatever worked for someone last time, we may see the next person try it.”He knows what he is talking about – not only does 1998 hold the record for the most daily White House briefings in a year, Lockhart was also the incumbent who had to deal with President Clinton’s impeachment proceedings over the Monica Lewinsky affair.“No matter how hard it gets, if you don’t go out there you have raised the white flag and then the press decides every day what the narrative is,” he says.For Martha Joynt Kumar, director of the non-profit White House Transition Project and emeritus professor in the department of political science at Towson University, Maryland, the nonchalance for the press secretary’s office will continue as long as President Trump is in office.“What’s really different here is the president – because he sees himself as the communicator, essentially the press secretary to communications chief,” she says. “That is why you have had the turnover you have.”With speculation that Melania Trump’s spokeswoman, Stephanie Grisham, or former state department spokeswoman Heather Nauert – whom Trump had said he wanted to take a role at the UN – could be handed the reins after Sanders, it is clear that the way the president deals with the press is unlikely to change.Both Kumar, who has been tracking White House press secretaries since 1975, and Lockhart agree that the job of press secretary goes beyond pleasing the president. They act as protection for the Oval Office and should be able to jump on problems before they get out of hand and clarify the message from the White House. The press briefings also provide an opportunity to get the presidential message out about what different departments are doing.For a president with “no impulse control”, Lockhart says, and in an “era of social media where there is so much fake information out there”, it makes the press secretary job more important.He believes that both Sarah Sanders and predecessor Sean Spicer have been “unable to control the narrative”, particularly around Robert Mueller’s Russia report and the question of whether Trump deserves impeachment over potentially obstructing that investigation.Not using the briefing room podium has meant the media have filled the silence with the president’s angry and false tweets instead. Lockhart says there is value in the president tweeting, but pushing other news, like he did amid the impeachment scandal in 1998 and 1999, helps the president.“We took the shots and there were lots of days where nothing broke through [into the news cycle] but there were days when many things broke through,” Lockhart says.The public, reporters and White House all rely on an attitude of mutual trust to ensure information is correct, and that is not there at the moment. The briefings, according to Mr Lockhart, “create a historical record of when the White House has not been truthful and when they don’t give answers” and the public needs that.Lockhart also gives the example of the recent leaking of internal White House polling into where Trump stands in relation to his Democrat rivals ahead of the 2020 election.“It is a perfect example of a story that has hung around for days when it should have been a one-day story,” he says. “The simple answer is: ‘We don’t discuss our internal polls and we are very confident the president is going to win re-election.’” Without a platform to formally move the story on, Mr Trump’s tweets have kept it alive.Another aspect that Trump has changed is the fact he does more short Q&A sessions outside the White House ahead of trips – more than 400 according to Kumar, having tweeted in January that he told Sanders “not to bother” with the televised briefings.“I think the short Q&As give him a chance to keep him in the news all the time,” Kumar says. “Other presidents thought the public would get sick of them appearing so Trump may have changed the notion of that.”But Lockhart – who says he only remembers heading to the driveway for such a briefing once – says that by doing so, Mr Trump puts reporters on the back foot meaning they cannot always ask the questions they need to.“People don’t have notice that it is happening, they take it live. It is a way of putting the media at their worst place and getting them to scramble there, and that is what it is designed for.”> The reason Sarah Sanders does not go to the “podium” much anymore is that the press covers her so rudely & inaccurately, in particular certain members of the press. I told her not to bother, the word gets out anyway! Most will never cover us fairly & hence, the term, Fake News!> > — Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) > > January 22, 2019Both Lockhart and Kumar would like to see the daily press briefings return, with the former Clinton press secretary saying it allows reporters to “ask the questions that need to be asked” of the administration.Indeed, alongside his Words Matter podcast Lockhart has started tweeting a “shadow briefing” detailing the questions he believes the White House needs to be asked but currently is not.Even Spicer, who attracted 4.3 million viewers at his peak for the daily press briefings in early 2017, says he thinks they should return, although not every day.“Figure out a way to mix them in,” Spicer told VOA earlier this week. He characterises the briefings in the Trump administration as devolving into “media circuses where it’s been a yell fest, where it’s been an opportunity for someone to get up and showboat”. Spicer says three to five hours would go into preparing each briefing, which Kumar has said used to make up the bulk of the day. She suggests if the White House does not bring back the briefing that time could be known as “press secretary time” aping Mr Trump’s “executive time”, where he tweets and watches cable news networks.Lockhart is hopeful that if Trump does not bring back the briefing, the next president does reinstate the “powerful tool” – particularly if the press secretary tells the truth. Although he says he would even want them back if whoever Trump picks next continues to lie.Taking California senator Kamala Harris as a random example from the Democrats looking to become president in 2020, Lockhart says it would be in the next president’s interest to restore the credibility of the role to help get their message and philosophy out.“[Harris] won’t be able to control the narrative like Trump does,” he says. “Because she is a responsible intelligent human being who is not going to tweet out garbage every day.”Joe Lockhart’s Verdict On:Sean Spicer: “Sean tried to straddle the line between being a traditional press secretary and being Trump’s. It’s not possible and it killed him.”Anthony Scaramucci: “Scaramucci was a bad joke the president played on the country. Talk about out of his depth.”Sarah Sanders: “She was the president’s personal publicist, not the press secretary for the American public.”


Attorney Michael Avenatti faces November trial in New York

Attorney Michael Avenatti faces November trial in New York California attorney Michael Avenatti learned Tuesday that he faces a November trial date on charges he tried to extort millions of dollars from Nike. The Nov. 12 trial date was set by U.S. District Judge Paul G. Gardephe at a pretrial hearing in Manhattan. Avenatti participated by telephone.


Attorney Michael Avenatti faces November trial in New York

Attorney Michael Avenatti faces November trial in New York California attorney Michael Avenatti learned Tuesday that he faces a November trial date on charges he tried to extort millions of dollars from Nike. The Nov. 12 trial date was set by U.S. District Judge Paul G. Gardephe at a pretrial hearing in Manhattan. Avenatti participated by telephone.


Attorney Michael Avenatti faces November trial in New York

Attorney Michael Avenatti faces November trial in New York California attorney Michael Avenatti learned Tuesday that he faces a November trial date on charges he tried to extort millions of dollars from Nike. The Nov. 12 trial date was set by U.S. District Judge Paul G. Gardephe at a pretrial hearing in Manhattan. Avenatti participated by telephone.


McConnell on reparations for slavery: Not a 'good idea'

McConnell on reparations for slavery: Not a 'good idea' Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell on Tuesday rejected reparations for slavery in part because it would be hard to know whom to pay. The Kentucky Republican spoke to reporters on the eve of a rare House hearing on what compensation, if any, the U.S. might owe for the economic and other damage done by slavery. "We tried to deal with our original sin of slavery by fighting a civil war, by passing landmark civil rights legislation, elected an African American president," Barack Obama, in 2008, McConnell said.


Attorney: Deputy considering lawsuit against Raptors' Ujiri

Attorney: Deputy considering lawsuit against Raptors' Ujiri A sheriff's deputy sustained serious injuries and is considering a lawsuit against Masai Ujiri after an altercation with the Toronto Raptors president following Thursday's title-clinching victory in Oakland, the deputy's attorney said. David Mastagni, the deputy's attorney, told Bay Area CBS affiliate KPIX late Monday that his client has a "serious concussion" and a "serious jaw injury" after an "unprovoked, significant hit to the jaw" caused by Ujiri. The altercation occurred when Ujiri was trying to get on the court after the Raptors beat the Golden State Warriors in Game 6 to win the NBA championship.


Attorney: Deputy considering lawsuit against Raptors' Ujiri

Attorney: Deputy considering lawsuit against Raptors' Ujiri A sheriff's deputy sustained serious injuries and is considering a lawsuit against Masai Ujiri after an altercation with the Toronto Raptors president following Thursday's title-clinching victory in Oakland, the deputy's attorney said. David Mastagni, the deputy's attorney, told Bay Area CBS affiliate KPIX late Monday that his client has a "serious concussion" and a "serious jaw injury" after an "unprovoked, significant hit to the jaw" caused by Ujiri. The altercation occurred when Ujiri was trying to get on the court after the Raptors beat the Golden State Warriors in Game 6 to win the NBA championship.


Trump says immigration roundup will start next week

Trump says immigration roundup will start next week U.S. President Donald Trump repeated on Tuesday that immigration authorities would next week target migrants in the country illegally in large-scale arrests, but still gave no details about the planned action. "They're going to start next week, and with people coming to our country, and they come in illegally - they have to go out," he told reporters at the White House before a trip to Florida where he will formally launch his re-election campaign. Trump also praised Mexico for action he said it has taken to stem the flow of immigrants to the United States.


The Latest: Indiana AG's office plans vigorous defense

The Latest: Indiana AG's office plans vigorous defense The Indiana attorney general's office says it will vigorously defend him against a federal lawsuit by four women who say he drunkenly groped them during a party last year. The lawsuit filed Tuesday alleges sexual harassment by Republican state Attorney General Curtis Hill on a state lawmaker and three legislative staffers in March 2018 at an Indianapolis bar. Hill has denied wrongdoing and rebuffed calls from Republican Gov. Eric Holcomb to resign.


The Latest: Indiana AG's office plans vigorous defense

The Latest: Indiana AG's office plans vigorous defense The Indiana attorney general's office says it will vigorously defend him against a federal lawsuit by four women who say he drunkenly groped them during a party last year. The lawsuit filed Tuesday alleges sexual harassment by Republican state Attorney General Curtis Hill on a state lawmaker and three legislative staffers in March 2018 at an Indianapolis bar. Hill has denied wrongdoing and rebuffed calls from Republican Gov. Eric Holcomb to resign.


The Latest: Indiana AG's office plans vigorous defense

The Latest: Indiana AG's office plans vigorous defense The Indiana attorney general's office says it will vigorously defend him against a federal lawsuit by four women who say he drunkenly groped them during a party last year. The lawsuit filed Tuesday alleges sexual harassment by Republican state Attorney General Curtis Hill on a state lawmaker and three legislative staffers in March 2018 at an Indianapolis bar. Hill has denied wrongdoing and rebuffed calls from Republican Gov. Eric Holcomb to resign.


Google pledges $1 bn for housing crisis in Bay Area

Google pledges $1 bn for housing crisis in Bay Area Google on Tuesday pledged to commit more than $1 billion to help address the severe housing crisis in the region that includes its headquarters and Silicon Valley. Chief executive Sundar Pichai announced the initiative, saying the internet colossus wants to be "a good neighbor" in the area bursting with technology companies. The move comes with Silicon Valley firms under pressure over the spike in real estate prices, lack of affordable housing and growing homeless problem in the San Francisco Bay region.