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Poland pulls out of Israel summit in row over WW2 role

Poland pulls out of Israel summit in row over WW2 role Prime Minister Mateusz Morawiecki branded the remarks "racist and unacceptable". The leaders of the other three 'Visegrad Group' nations - Hungary, the Czech Republic and Slovakia - all still planned to attend the talks, Israel said, but Czech Prime Minister Andrej Babis said they would instead consist of bilateral discussions and that the summit would be rescheduled for later in 2019. The diplomatic spat between Poland and Israel has been escalating since Friday, when Israeli media reported remarks by Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu on Friday suggesting Polish complicity in the Holocaust.


Alabama man awarded $151M in Ford Explorer rollover lawsuit

Alabama man awarded $151M in Ford Explorer rollover lawsuit Jury finds company failed to meet safety guidelines and destroyed testing data.


American and British ISIS brides Hoda Muthana and Shamima Begum plead to go home

American and British ISIS brides Hoda Muthana and Shamima Begum plead to go home Hoda Muthana and Shamima Begum fled to Syria to marry Islamic State group fighters. Now they want to come home.


Biden shames US policies in Munich speech, calls America 'an embarrassment'

Biden shames US policies in Munich speech, calls America 'an embarrassment' Former Vice President Joe Biden slams President Trump's treatment of European allies as speculation mounts of a possible 2020 run. Rep. Michael Waltz reacts.


Trump's 'relentless attack' on FBI prompted memoir by former official: NPR

Trump's 'relentless attack' on FBI prompted memoir by former official: NPR Former top FBI official Andrew McCabe decried the "relentless attack" he said U.S. President Donald Trump has launched against the agency, according to released excerpts of an interview with NPR's Morning Edition, to be aired early Monday. "I think the FBI has been under a relentless attack in the last two years," said McCabe, who is promoting his new memoir, "The Threat: How the FBI Protects America in the Age of Terrorism and Trump." Trump's attack is one of the reasons he wrote his book, he said in a wide-ranging interview that covered everything from his own firing, the probe into Russia’s alleged role in the 2016 presidential election, and FBI morale.


Shamima Begum is 'traumatised', says her lawyer as he likens Isil bride to a First World War soldier

Shamima Begum is 'traumatised', says her lawyer as he likens Isil bride to a First World War soldier The Isil bride who travelled to Syria to marry a terrorist is "traumatised", according to her lawyer, who likened his client to a World War One soldier.  Shamima Begum, 19, flew to the Middle East four years ago to join the terror group. There, she married a Dutch-born fighter with whom she had three children.  Her two eldest children have died, but she gave birth at a refugee camp in northeastern Syria on the weekend and now wants to return to Britain.  In an interview over the weekend, Begum said that people should be feeling sympathy for her, and her lawyer Tasnime Akunjee defended her attitude.  He told ITV's Good Morning Britain: "I think it's difficult to take what she's saying in the current circumstances and try to draw from the lack of emotion that she has.  "She's a traumatised person. She finds herself in a camp and was clearly quite attached to her husband, it would seem, and suddenly he's not by her side." Lawyer Tasnime Akunjee Credit: Emrah Gurel/AP When confronted with the fact Begum does not seem traumatised and instead appeared to be composed, Mr Akunjee said: "You might've said the same thing about a World War One soldier in the middle of shellshock." Presenter Philip Madeley said this comparison was "a bit of a stretch", to which Mr Akumjee responded:  "It's a warzone. They're both warzones." The Begum's family lawyer, Mr Akunjee, said he understood some of the responses to her pleas for sympathy. He told BBC Breakfast: "The family have gone out of their way from day one to try to get her away from the Isil narrative and the context which she finds herself in. "She's been there for four years and we would be surprised if she hadn't been further damaged beyond the degree she had already been groomed into. "The family are concerned, as they have been for the last four years, not just to get her away, but, as of yesterday, to make sure that their grandchild - her child - is not influenced by that sort of thinking." Mr Akunjee said he anticipated that Begum would probably face criminal proceedings upon any return to the UK, but said it was the family's hope that she would be given professional help following her experience in Syria. Begum was one of three schoolgirls, along with Kadiza Sultana and Amira Abase, from Bethnal Green Academy who left the UK for Syria in February 2015. Ms Sultana was reported to have been killed in an air strike in 2016, while the other two are reported to still be alive. 'Show me some sympathy', says Isil bride after giving birth The British schoolgirl who ran away to join Isil has appealed for public sympathy following the birth of her son, as a row intensifies over whether she should be allowed to return to the UK. Shamima Begum, 19, went to Syria in 2015 and was discovered there in a refugee camp last week, heavily pregnant and insisting she wanted to go home. The birth of her child over the weekend prompted calls for the baby to be subject to care proceedings should Begum be able to return from Syria, as it emerged that the Family Division of the High Court had presided over cases involving at least 150 children deemed at risk of radicalisation in the last five years. In an interview with Sky News recorded at the Kurdish-controlled camp to which she fled from the last pocket of Isil-controlled territory, Begum said there was "no evidence" she had done anything wrong and she could not see "any reason" why her child should be taken from her when she had simply been living as a housewife. Speaking just hours after giving birth, her baby at her side, she said she had no regrets about fleeing the family home in Bethnal Green, east London, to support Isil, claiming the experience had made her "stronger, tougher". Shamima Begum's Dutch-born husband Yago Riedjik She said she could see a future for herself and her son, whom she has named Jarah after one of the two children she lost to malnutrition and disease in the last three months, "if the UK are willing to take me back and help me start a new life again and try and move on from everything that’s happened in the last four years". She added: "I wouldn’t have found someone like my husband [Yago Riedijk, 26, a Muslim convert from the Netherlands] in the UK. I had my kids, I had a good time there." Her other children, Jarah and Surayah, a daughter, died aged 18 months and nine months. Asked how she felt about the debate over whether she should be allowed to return home, Begum said: "I feel a lot of people should have sympathy for me, for everything I’ve been through. "I didn’t know what I was getting into when I left, I just was hoping that maybe for the sake of me and my child they let me come back.  "I can’t live in this camp forever. It’s not really possible." In the interview, Begum apologised for the first time to her family for running away, and said that though she knew it was "like a big slap in the face" for her to ask after she had previously rejected their calls for her to return, "I really need their help". Tim Loughton, deputy chairman of the home affairs select committee, said he thought it "extraordinary" that Begum was asking to come back while showing "not a scintilla of regret". The Conservative MP added: "My own feeling is in line with most others, that she has made her bed and should lie in it. But the law must prevail and we are probably going to have to let her back" "However, I think her child should be subjected to care proceedings due to the threat of radicalisation." He said a forthcoming report by the Henry Jackson Society disclosed that the Family Division of the High Court had presided over cases involving at least 150 children deemed at risk of radicalisation in the last five years. Sajid Javid, the Home Secretary, said last week that he would "not hesitate" to prevent the return of anyone who supported terrorist organisations abroad. He reiterated his stance in a Sunday newspaper article, expressing compassion for any child born or brought into a conflict zone, but stating that the safety and security of children living in this country had to be the priority. Isil schoolgirls' journey into Syria Jeremy Wright, the Culture Secretary and former Attorney General, said Britain was "obliged" to take back British citizens.  However, he added: "That doesn’t mean that we can’t put in place the necessary security measures to monitor their activities. It doesn’t mean either that we can’t seek to hold them to account for their behaviour thus far.”  He said the nationality of Begum’s baby was a "difficult question", but the pair’s health was the most pressing matter. "In the end she will have to answer for her actions," he added. "So I think it is right that if she’s able to come back to the UK that she does so on the understanding that we can hold her to account for her behaviour thus far." Ms Begum said she was attracted to Isil by videos that she had seen online, which she said showed "how they’ll take care of you". She said she knew that the group carried out beheadings, but that she "was OK with it at first. I started becoming religious just before I left and from what I heard Islamically that is all allowed". "At first it was nice," she said of life in the so-called Islamic State. "It was how they showed it in the videos, you know, you come, make a family together, but then things got harder.  "We had to keep moving and moving and moving. The situation got fraught." Begum acknowledged that it would be "really hard" to be rehabilitated after everything she had been through.   "I’m still in that mentality of planes over my head, emergency backpacks, starving... it would be a big shock to go back to the UK and start again," she said. Isil bride Shamima Begum | Read more Writing in The Sunday Times, Mr Javid said that decisions about what to do with potential returnees had to be made on a case-by-case basis, based on the "facts of each case, the law and the threat to national security". He added: "I think about the children that could in future get caught up in dangerous groups if we don’t take a firm stance against those who support them… And that means sending a message to those who have backed terrorism: there will be consequences." His comments were described as "sick" by Ms Begum’s lawyer on Sunday. Mr Akunje told Radio 4’s The World This Weekend: "We are talking about a newborn baby who poses no risk or threat to anybody, [who is] not even cognitive, and yet he’s speaking about a child who’s a British citizen in terms of a security threat." Mr Akunje suggested that the birth of Begum’s child increased pressure on the British authorities to allow her to return home. He also revealed that Begum’s family has struggled to make direct contact with her and is now considering the possibility of getting out to Syria themselves. Her family has indicated that if she is jailed for supporting a terrorist group, they want to step in and raise her son themselves. Cressida Dick hits back at claims Met failed  The Metropolitan Police Commissioner has hit back at claims that officers failed to stop another runaway schoolgirl on the same flight as a 15-year-old arrested as she attempted to flee the UK to join Islamic State (IS). Cressida Dick said it was "incredibly complicated" and difficult to know about somebody's intentions, and claimed the schoolgirls - Sharmeena Begum and another unnamed passenger - were in fact on separate flights as the latter was pulled from the runway at Heathrow in December 2014 when she sought to get to Syria. The Times newspaper said the 15-year-old was arrested but not prosecuted, despite officers finding extremist material on her devices. Asked about the flight to Istanbul, on which both Sharmeena Begum and the unnamed 15-year-old were said to have been passengers en route to Syria, Ms Dick told ITV's Good Morning Britain: "I think it was actually a different flight and I think the question that's being asked is whether we were able to pass on sufficient information and understand well enough what these three girls were intending. "The truth of the matter is it's incredibly hard to know what somebody's intending. "The moment we informed the school about the girl who came off the flight, we did not know these girls were intending that, they were merely witnesses and we were talking to them as witnesses. These things are incredibly complicated. "We try to stop people from travelling when we knew they were travelling with ill-intent." Sign up for your essential, twice-daily briefing from The Telegraph with our free Front Page newsletter.


EU states mixed on Trump demand to take back IS fighters

EU states mixed on Trump demand to take back IS fighters BRUSSELS (AP) — U.S. President Donald Trump's demand that European countries take back their citizens fighting in Syria received a mixed reaction Monday, as nations voiced concerns about how to bring home-grown Islamic State extremists to trial.


Belgian Jewish museum trial interrupted as juror questioned

Belgian Jewish museum trial interrupted as juror questioned The trial of a Frenchman accused of shooting dead four people at the Jewish museum of Belgium was interrupted on Monday as police were summoned to question a juror. "We cannot start the closing arguments under these conditions," judge Laurence Massart said, after recusing the juror for having communicated with outside parties. "The sixth juror contacted police officials on Friday afternoon to say he met with parties not heard in this trial with whom he discussed the case file," she added.


Critics urge Presidents Day protests against Trump's emergency declaration

Critics urge Presidents Day protests against Trump's emergency declaration Activists called for nationwide protests on Monday's Presidents Day holiday to demonstrate against President Donald Trump's declaration of a national emergency to secure funding for a U.S.-Mexico border wall. Organizers of the demonstrations, the nonprofit advocacy group MoveOn.org, said they would be held throughout the day in towns and cities including Washington, Chicago, New York, Los Angeles and San Francisco. It called Trump's declaration an abuse of power and usurpation of Congress.


Here are 3 small steps to grow savings of thousands of dollars in a 401(k)

Here are 3 small steps to grow savings of thousands of dollars in a 401(k) Most people don't amass big savings overnight. Start small in a 401(k) and keep building with bonuses, remembering the power of dollar-cost averaging.


Russia's RT fumes after Facebook blocks 'wildly popular' page

Russia's RT fumes after Facebook blocks 'wildly popular' page Facebook has blocked a popular page run by Russian state TV channel RT, the channel's editor said Monday, criticising the move as an attack on media rights. The project was wildly popular -- 2.5 billion views and four million subscribers on Facebook alone!" RT editor-in-chief Margarita Simonyan said on her Telegram social network account. "We didn't violate any Facebook rules," she said.


Venezuela expels Europe lawmakers as aid showdown intensifies

Venezuela expels Europe lawmakers as aid showdown intensifies Venezuela has expelled five visiting European lawmakers, an act opposition leader Juan Guaido branded "irrational" as his showdown with President Nicolas Maduro over the arrival of international aid intensifies. The members of the European Parliament were being tossed out with no explanation, said Spanish MEP Esteban Gonzalez Pons, who led the group. "We are being expelled from Venezuela.


Weekend beauty highlights from London Fashion Week

Weekend beauty highlights from London Fashion Week London Fashion Week got underway over the weekend, and if the first few days of catwalk shows were anything to go by, then we're in for a playful hair and beauty spectacle for the Fall/Winter 2019 season.


Facebook 'digital gangsters' violated privacy laws: MPs

Facebook 'digital gangsters' violated privacy laws: MPs A scathing British parliamentary report on Monday branded Facebook "digital gangsters" that knowingly violated data privacy and competition laws. Lawmakers' 18-month investigation into disinformation and "fake news" also accused Facebook of failing to faithfully fight Russia's alleged attempts to influence elections. Facebook co-founder and chief Mark Zuckerberg turned down three requests to appear before the committee.


Australia's major political parties hacked by 'state actor' ahead of elections

Australia's major political parties hacked by 'state actor' ahead of elections A “sophisticated state actor” was behind a cyberattack on the Australian Parliament's computing network that also affected the network of major political parties, the prime minister said on Monday. Prime Minister Scott Morrison did not identify the state behind what he described as a “malicious intrusion” on Feb 8. A joint statement from House of Representatives speaker Tony Smith and Senate president Scott Ryan said at the time there was no evidence that data had been accessed in the breach. But lawmakers were advised to change passwords. Morrison revealed Monday that the computer networks of the government parties - the Liberal Party and the Nationals - as well as the opposition Labor Party had also been affected. Australia's security agencies were securing those systems and protecting users, he said. “Our cyber experts believe that a sophisticated state actor is responsible for this malicious activity,” Morrison told reporters. “Let me be clear, though - there is no evidence of any electoral interference. We have put in place a number of measures to ensure the integrity of our electoral system,” he added. The Australian Cyber Security Center, the government's main cyber security agency, had briefed federal and state election authorities, Morrison said. New South Wales, Australia's most populous state, will hold elections on March 23. A federal election will be held on a date to be set in May. Duncan Lewis, director general of the Australian Security Intelligence Organization, the nation's main spy agency, would not comment on how deeply the attack had penetrated the computer networks. “The electoral machinery which we have in this country, that's the Australian Electoral Commission and the various state electoral commissions that work with the federal system - there is no evidence that they have been compromised,” Lewis told a Senate committee. He would not say whether the attack had been neutralized, saying it was “being managed.” Although Australian officials have not blamed any country, in 2011 it was reported that China was suspected of accessing the email system used by lawmakers and parliamentary staff. Election interference has been high on the international agenda ever since America's 2016 presidential election, in which Russian hackers stole and published more than 150,000 emails from various Democratic targets in what U.S. spymasters and senior lawmakers have described as a wide-ranging effort to help elect Donald Trump.


This Week: Walmart results, Fed minutes, US home sales

This Week: Walmart results, Fed minutes, US home sales A look at some of the key business events and economic indicators upcoming this week:


Ready, Aim, Fire!: Watch This Deadly Russian T-90MS Tank Go To War

Ready, Aim, Fire!: Watch This Deadly Russian T-90MS Tank Go To War All to capture some important arms sales.


Vigil honors victims of gun rampage at Henry Pratt Company in Aurora, Illinois

Vigil honors victims of gun rampage at Henry Pratt Company in Aurora, Illinois The Aurora Prayer Coalition and area churches hosted a vigil at the Henry Pratt Co., where a shooting took place Friday.


California tells Trump that lawsuit over border wall is 'imminent'

California tells Trump that lawsuit over border wall is 'imminent' California will "imminently" challenge President Donald Trump's declaration of a national emergency to obtain funds for a U.S.-Mexico border wall, state Attorney General Xavier Becerra said on Sunday. "Definitely and imminently," Becerra told ABC's "This Week" program when asked whether and when California would sue the Trump administration in federal court. Trump invoked the emergency powers on Friday under a 1976 law after Congress rebuffed his request for $5.7 billion to help build the wall that was a signature 2016 campaign promise.


Fast-moving storm will bring pockets of heavy rain to Southland on Sunday

Fast-moving storm will bring pockets of heavy rain to Southland on Sunday A fast-moving storm system is expected to bring heavy rain to parts of the Southland while dumping several inches of snow in the mountains.


Chicago police seek follow-up interview with 'Empire' actor

Chicago police seek follow-up interview with 'Empire' actor Chicago police have shifted the direction of their investigation into actor Jussie Smollett's report of a hate-crime assault and are seeking to interview him again, after releasing two men detained for questioning in the probe, a police spokesman said on Saturday. According to Smollett's account, his assailants struck him in the face, draped a rope around his neck and doused him with an "unknown chemical substance" before fleeing. On Wednesday evening this week, police said they arrested two Nigerian brothers described as "persons of interest" who were recognized from surveillance camera footage taken in the area of the alleged Jan. 29 assault.


How many push-ups can you do? Study finds men who can do 40 have lower risk of heart disease

How many push-ups can you do? Study finds men who can do 40 have lower risk of heart disease Active, middle-aged men who could do more than 40 push-ups in timed test had significantly lower risks for heart problems, according to a new study.


Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez Celebrated Amazon Pulling Out of New York––But the Governor Says It Cost the City 25,000 Jobs

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez Celebrated Amazon Pulling Out of New York––But the Governor Says It Cost the City 25,000 Jobs The spat between Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and Gov. Andrew Cuomo lays bare a growing divide over Amazon's decision to pull out of New York City.


Alabama jury awards $152 million in Ford Explorer rollover case

Alabama jury awards $152 million in Ford Explorer rollover case The jury awarded $100 million in punitive damages and the rest in compensatory damages after finding on Friday that the 1998 Ford Explorer did not meet Ford's own safety guidelines and that Ford "acted wantonly" in designing the vehicle, according to a court document seen by Reuters and lawyers for plaintiff Travaris "Tre" Smith. Ford said it plans to appeal.


Polish PM cancels Israel visit amid new Holocaust tensions

Polish PM cancels Israel visit amid new Holocaust tensions WARSAW, Poland (AP) — Polish Prime Minister Mateusz Morawiecki canceled his plans to attend a meeting of central European leaders in Israel starting Monday amid new tensions over how Polish behavior during the Holocaust is remembered and characterized.


California mounts legal challenge to Donald Trump's state of emergency border wall plans

California mounts legal challenge to Donald Trump's state of emergency border wall plans California is set to become the first state to legally challenge Donald Trump's declaration of a national emergency to secure funding for a border wall, its attorney general said on Sunday. After a failed attempt to convince Congress to sign off on his demand for $5.7 billion (£4.4 billion) to build a structure along the country's southern border with Mexico, the US president announced he would be invoking the controversial power on Friday. By doing so, he is now theoretically able to siphon off money - up to $8 billion -  from government departments to fulfill his key campaign pledge. But it was long expected that the move would be slowed down and possibly torpedoed by legal challenges. Already, landowners in Texas have filed lawsuits saying it violates the Constitution and would infringe on their property rights. On Sunday Xavier Becerra, California's attorney general, signaled the Golden State would lead the way, arguing that money directed to the wall project would mean less federal funding for vital services for emergency responses, the military and tackling drug trafficking. A section of the border fence in Naco, Arizona, being replaces with modern barriers  Credit:  UPI / Barcroft Media When asked whether and when California would sue the Trump administration, he replied: “Definitely and imminently. We are prepared, we knew something like this might happen. "And with our sister state partners, we are ready to go,” he told  ABC's "This Week." “We’re confident there are at least 8 billion ways that we can prove harm." Other Democrat-controlled states are expected to join the action and House Democrats have said they will introduce a resolution that would block the declaration.  Ultimately, the legal battle will probably end at the conservative-leaning Supreme Court to which Mr Trump has appointed two justices since he took office.  Stephen Miller, a senior White House adviser, told Fox News on Sunday that the declaration would allow the administration to build “hundreds of miles” of border wall by September 2020. “We have 120-odd miles that are already under construction or are already obligated plus the additional funds we have and then we’re going to outlay - we’re going to look at a few hundred miles.” He also suggested the US leader would veto Congress should there be any resolution to block the emergency declaration. "Obviously the president is going to protect his national emergency declaration.  "This (illegal immigration) is a threat in our country … and if the president can’t defend this country, then he cannot fulfill his constitutional oath of office," he added.


Ex-congressman Weiner released from prison after sexting scandal

Ex-congressman Weiner released from prison after sexting scandal Weiner, 54, has been released from the Federal Medical Center in Devens, Massachusetts, and is under the supervision of a residential re-entry management office in Brooklyn, according to prison records. The seven-term congressman who ran unsuccessfully several times for New York City mayor will be free on May 14, records show, about three months earlier than his 21-month sentence. The FBI discovered a trove of emails belonging to his then-wife, Huma Abedin, a senior aide to Hillary Clinton, on Weiner's laptop.


Saudi crown prince begins Asia tour with $20 billion Pakistan investment pledge

Saudi crown prince begins Asia tour with $20 billion Pakistan investment pledge Kicking off his tour of South Asia and China with a far higher Pakistan investment than expected, the crown prince said the $20 billion figure represents only the start of an economic tie-up that would bring the historic Muslim allies even closer. "It’s big for phase 1, and definitely it will grow every month and every year, and it will be beneficial to both countries," said the crown prince. "We have been a brotherly country, a friendly country to Pakistan.


Israel clears Palestinians from Jerusalem home claimed by settlers

Israel clears Palestinians from Jerusalem home claimed by settlers Israeli police on Sunday evicted a Palestinian family from their home in the Muslim Quarter of Jerusalem's Old City, after the supreme court ruled Jewish claimants were the rightful owners. An AFP photographer said residents of the neighbourhood in Israeli-annexed east Jerusalem scuffled with police, who stood guard as about a dozen Israeli settlers took possession of the large building. Rania Abu Asab, who lived in the house with her husband, their children and his aunt, stood weeping outside as the settlers raised the Israeli flag on the roof.


Bill De Blasio Slams Amazon’s ‘Abuse of Corporate Power’

Bill De Blasio Slams Amazon’s ‘Abuse of Corporate Power’ “They couldn’t handle the heat in the kitchen,” de Blasio said. Separately, de Blasio said he had not ruled out a 2020 presidential run, but would take his message about corporations nationwide regardless of his decision. Amazon’s announcement has sparked a furious debate over whether local officials and activists should be blamed for losing New York an estimated 25,000 to 40,000 high-paying tech jobs, or whether the firm had reacted too rashly to public concerns.


Trump to veto Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez resolution blocking national emergency unless Republicans lend support

Trump to veto Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez resolution blocking national emergency unless Republicans lend support Donald Trump is prepared to issue the first veto of his presidency over a national emergency declaration his critics have slammed as an unconstitutional power grab, a senior White House official said on Sunday. White House senior adviser Stephen Miller told Fox News Sunday that “the president is going to protect his national emergency declaration”. The president declared the emergency Friday in an effort to go around Congress to fund his border wall.


NASA posts image of ghostly blue objects, deep in the cosmos

NASA posts image of ghostly blue objects, deep in the cosmos When a star is born, a chaotic light show ensues.  NASA's long-lived Hubble Space Telescope captured vivid bright clumps moving through the cosmos at some 1,000 light years from Earth. The space agency called these objects clear "smoking gun" evidence of a newly formed star — as new stars blast colossal amounts of energy-rich matter into space, known as plasma.  Seen as the vivid blue, ephemeral clumps in the top center of the new image below, these are telltale signs of an energy-rich gas, or plasma, colliding with a huge collection of dust and gas in deep space. As NASA says, these blue masses are transient creations in the cosmos, as "they disappear into nothingness within a few tens of thousands of years." Bright lights inside a nebula. Image: ESA/Hubble/NASA/K. Stapelfeldt These blue clumps are traveling at 150,000 mph toward the upper left direction (from our view, anyhow). In total, there are five of these ghostly clumps, hurtling through space.  SEE ALSO: Opportunity rover's last picture is as grim as it is dark NASA doesn't identify the new star itself, called SVS 13, perhaps because it's obscured by thick clouds of cosmic matter. This collection of dust and gas is part of a distant nebula, which are often the remnants of exploded stars swirling through the infinity of space. WATCH: Ever wonder how the universe might end?


Polish PM nixes trip to Israel after Netanyahu Holocaust 'comment': govt

Polish PM nixes trip to Israel after Netanyahu Holocaust 'comment': govt Polish Prime Minister Mateusz Morawiecki has cancelled a visit to Israel for a high-level summit, a government spokesperson told AFP on Sunday, after uproar in Poland over reported comments by Israeli leader Benjamin Netanyahu about the Poles and the Holocaust. Netanyahu -- who was initially quoted in Haaretz newspaper as saying that "The Poles collaborated with the Nazis" -- has been condemned in Poland for appearing to accuse all Polish people of cooperating with Germany during World War II. Warsaw has long been at pains to point out that Poland, which was occupied by Nazi Germany, could not have and did not collaborate in the Holocaust although individual Poles may have done so.


UN envoy arrives in Yemen to discuss truce around port city

UN envoy arrives in Yemen to discuss truce around port city SANAA, Yemen (AP) — U.N. envoy Martin Griffiths arrived on Sunday in the capital, Sanaa, to discuss the "complex situation" in and around the key port city of Hodeida, Yemeni security officials said.


Acting Pentagon chief not decided yet on funding border wall

Acting Pentagon chief not decided yet on funding border wall President Donald Trump on Friday declared a national emergency in a bid to fund his promised wall at the U.S.-Mexico border without congressional approval. A U.S. defense official, speaking on the condition of anonymity, said that Shanahan was likely to approve the $3.6 billion being redirected from the military construction budget. By declaring a national emergency, Trump can use certain Department of Defense funding to build the wall.


Top US official discussed Trump removal in 2017: ex-FBI chief

Top US official discussed Trump removal in 2017: ex-FBI chief The US deputy attorney general discussed how many cabinet members would support removing US President Donald Trump from office in 2017, the FBI's former acting director said in an interview airing Sunday. Andrew McCabe said invoking the 25th Amendment of the US Constitution was raised by Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein after Trump fired FBI director James Comey on May 9, 2017.


Chicago AccuWeather: 2-4 inches of snow on Sunday

Chicago AccuWeather: 2-4 inches of snow on Sunday Steady snow throughout the day Sunday with 2 to 4 inches expected across the Chicago area. Highs in 20s.


Here’s What’s Open and Closed on President’s Day 2019

Here’s What’s Open and Closed on President’s Day 2019 Find out if banks, schools and the post office are open on President's day


Iran points to Pakistan after deadly attack on Guard

Iran points to Pakistan after deadly attack on Guard TEHRAN, Iran (AP) — Iran's parliament speaker said Sunday that an attack that killed 27 members of Iran's elite Revolutionary Guard was "planned and carried out from inside Pakistan," which he said should answer for it.


Factory shooting rampage victims include HR manager, college intern and forklift operator

Factory shooting rampage victims include HR manager, college intern and forklift operator Gary Martin, a 15-year veteran of Henry Pratt, was fired Friday. Three of the victims were killed in the meeting where officials gave him the bad news; two others were killed elsewhere in the warehouse.


Israeli leader pledges funds for museum for Jewish WWII vets

Israeli leader pledges funds for museum for Jewish WWII vets JERUSALEM (AP) — Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu pledged Sunday that his government would allocate the necessary funds to complete a long-promised museum honoring Jewish World War II veterans.


World bishops head to Vatican for sex abuse summit

World bishops head to Vatican for sex abuse summit The heads of around 100 bishops' conferences from every continent will convene from Thursday to Sunday for the meeting on the protection of minors, with victims' groups demanding that a concrete action plan on fighting paedophilia be drawn up. The pope, who asked the bishops to speak to victims of abuse in their respective countries before the Rome convention, has tried to dial down "inflated expectations" for a cure-all. Several victims were also invited to the Vatican.


Irish backstop can't be changed for Brexit deal: Estonian president

Irish backstop can't be changed for Brexit deal: Estonian president There can be no changes to the Irish "backstop", an arrangement to avoid a hard border between European Union member Ireland and British-ruled Northern Ireland after Brexit, Estonian President Kersti Kaljulaid told Reuters. Many British lawmakers, especially in Prime Minister Theresa May's governing Conservative Party, fear the backstop will trap the UK in a permanent customs union with the EU after Brexit.


In Syria's Baghouz, dying palms and a wilting IS 'caliphate'

In Syria's Baghouz, dying palms and a wilting IS 'caliphate' The wilted palms and pomegranate trees at the entrance to Baghouz were struggling to survive, much like diehard Islamic State group fighters in the Syrian village. "The SDF were here," read a spray-painted Arabic message on a one-storey house. Atop a building captured by the SDF, a fighter peered out at columns of smoke from fresh bombardment.


Potato rösti

Potato rösti This potato rösti is the perfect way to use up that last bit of cheese in the fridge.  SERVES Two INGREDIENTS 500g potatoes, ideally a nice waxy chip potato 1 small onion, finely sliced 1 garlic clove, crushed and chopped Pinch of dried chilli 50g butter 120g mixed grated cheese such as cheddar, gruyere or comté (a great opportunity to use up leftovers) Large pinch of fresh or dried sage METHOD Peel the potatoes and coarsely grate them into a bowl. Add the onion, garlic and chilli and season well. Tip onto a tea towel and squeeze them tightly to remove any excess liquid, then return to the bowl and mix in 25g of the butter, diced. Add 15g of the butter to a large non-stick and ovenproof frying pan (large enough to hold the potato mixture) and allow to melt. Press the potato mixture into the pan and cook over a medium heat until the underside starts to crisp – from around six to 10 minutes. When ready, flip the rosti onto a plate (cooked side up), melt the rest of the butter in the pan and slide the rosti into it to cook on the other side for about 10 minutes, until browned and cooked through. To finish, preheat the grill and sprinkle the rosti with the grated cheese and sage, along with a good grinding of black pepper. Place until the grill until the cheese melts and bubbles. Serve with a crisp green salad. RECIPES | Angela's budget-friendly dishes


Hong Kong economy stalls amid trade dispute: finance chief

Hong Kong economy stalls amid trade dispute: finance chief Hong Kong's economy stalled last year as the ongoing China-US trade dispute and retail woes dragged down local business, the city's financial chief said Sunday. Beijing and Washington have already imposed duties on more than $360 billion in two-way trade, roiling global financial markets and weighing heavily on manufacturing output in both countries. "The impact of China-US trade frictions on Hong Kong's exports has clearly emerged at the end of last year," said finance secretary Paul Chan.


Illinois factory gunman obtained firearm permit despite felony conviction

Illinois factory gunman obtained firearm permit despite felony conviction Gary Martin, 45, who carried his pistol to work on Friday apparently suspecting he faced dismissal from his job, opened fire after being told of his termination in a meeting at the Henry Pratt Company plant in Aurora, Illinois, about 40 miles (64 km) west of Chicago, police said. The dead included the plant manager, a human resources supervisor, a human resources intern and two other workers. A sixth employee and five police officers responding to the scene were wounded, and the gunman himself was slain about 90 minutes later in a gunfight with police who stormed the building.


Illinois factory gunman obtained firearm permit despite felony conviction

Illinois factory gunman obtained firearm permit despite felony conviction Gary Martin, 45, who carried his pistol to work on Friday apparently suspecting he faced dismissal from his job, opened fire after being told of his termination in a meeting at the Henry Pratt Company plant in Aurora, Illinois, about 40 miles (64 km) west of Chicago, police said. The dead included the plant manager, a human resources supervisor, a human resources intern and two other workers. A sixth employee and five police officers responding to the scene were wounded, and the gunman himself was slain about 90 minutes later in a gunfight with police who stormed the building.


Japan's New F-3 Fighter: Why Not Just Buy More F-35s?

Japan's New F-3 Fighter: Why Not Just Buy More F-35s? We have a look at what Tokyo is planning.


College intern on first day among Illinois factory shooting victims

College intern on first day among Illinois factory shooting victims Trevor Wehner was working his first day as a human resources intern at Henry Pratt Company in Aurora, Illinois, when a worker who had just been fired killed him and four of his colleagues. Friday's shooting rampage at the water distribution products factory and warehouse west of Chicago also killed the plant's manager and its head of human resources. Wehner, 21, from the village of Sheridan, Illinois, was on track to graduate in May from Northern Illinois University (NIU) with a degree in human resource management, the school said.