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What the UN wants next in the investigation of Jamal Khashoggi's murder

What the UN wants next in the investigation of Jamal Khashoggi's murder "Khashoggi’s killing constituted an extrajudicial killing for which the State of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia is responsible," UN special report says.


Trump supporters in Florida say the president needs a third term

Trump supporters in Florida say the president needs a third term Conservatives at the official launch of the Trump 2020 campaign in Orlando say that illegal immigrants have no place in the U.S. and that if President Trump could have a third term, they would be onboard.


Egypt: UN office tries to politicize Morsi's courtroom death

Egypt: UN office tries to politicize Morsi's courtroom death Egypt said Wednesday that the U.N. human rights office was trying to politicize the death of former Egyptian president Mohammed Morsi, who collapsed inside a Cairo courtroom during his trial this week. Morsi, Egypt's first democratically elected president who hailed from the now outlawed Muslim Brotherhood group, was buried under heavy security early on Tuesday, a day after his dramatic collapse and death inside a Cairo courtroom. Rupert Colville, spokesman for the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights, called Tuesday for a "prompt, impartial, thorough and transparent investigation" into Morsi's death on Monday.


Iran talking to Russia and China in case EU nuclear deal efforts fail: TASS

Iran talking to Russia and China in case EU nuclear deal efforts fail: TASS Iran is in talks with Russia and China on a possible settlement mechanism in case discussions with EU over a nuclear deal fail, the Secretary of Iran's Supreme National Security council, Ali Shamkhani, said, according to Russia's TASS news agency. Tehran said in May it would reduce compliance with the nuclear pact it agreed with China, Russia and other world powers in 2015, in protest at the United States’ decision to unilaterally pull out of the agreement and reimpose sanctions last year.


U.S. Navy says mine fragments suggest Iran behind Gulf tanker attack

U.S. Navy says mine fragments suggest Iran behind Gulf tanker attack The United States sought on Wednesday to bolster its case for isolating Iran over its nuclear and regional activities by displaying limpet mine fragments it said came from a damaged oil tanker and saying the ordnance looked Iranian in origin. Iran has denied involvement in explosive strikes on two tankers in the Gulf of Oman last week and four tankers off the United Arab Emirates on May 12, both near the Strait of Hormuz, a major conduit for global oil supplies.


Russia, China, block US effort to halt North Korea fuel deliveries

Russia, China, block US effort to halt North Korea fuel deliveries Russia and China on Tuesday blocked an American initiative that aimed to halt fuel deliveries to North Korea, which Washington accuses of exceeding its annual ceiling for 2019, diplomatic sources said. Moscow and Beijing said more time was needed to study the US request, which was backed by 25 UN members including Japan, France and Germany, according to the sources. A week ago, the United States, in a report, accused North Korea of breaching the United Nations-imposed ceiling on fuel imports by carrying out dozens of ship-to-ship transfers.


Xiaomi Eyes $725 Million Expansion to Stave Off Huawei in China

Xiaomi Eyes $725 Million Expansion to Stave Off Huawei in China (Bloomberg) -- Xiaomi Corp. aims to spend an additional 5 billion yuan ($725 million) expanding its Chinese retail network over the next three years, anticipating a re-doubled effort by Huawei Technologies Co. to grow its domestic market share.The smartphone maker will spend the money on expanding distribution channels and on reward programs for its partners and sales employees, a person familiar with the matter said, citing an internal meeting convened by billionaire co-founder Lei Jun Tuesday. That spending comes on top of an existing budget for building up its retail operations. Chinese media outlet Caixin reported on the investment earlier.Huawei is said to be preparing for a drop in international smartphone shipments of 40% to 60% as the Trump administration bars its access to American components and software. That means Google will cut off popular apps like YouTube and stop providing updates for the Android system that powers all of Huawei’s devices abroad. It wants to grab as much as half of the smartphone market in China in 2019 to offset that decline overseas, people familiar with the matter have said, citing internal discussions about year-end goals. It hopes to get there also by investing in marketing and expanding distribution channels.Xiaomi aims to become the country’s top vendor but its priority is to at least become No. 3, the person said, asking not to be identified discussing internal goals. The company currently ranks fourth. It sees the roll-out of next-generation 5G mobile networks in coming years as a golden opportunity to boost sales on its home turf, the person added.Hong Kong-listed Xiaomi now commands about 12% of the Chinese smartphone market versus Huawei’s 34%, Canalys estimates. Its shipments slid 13% in the first quarter while its rivals’ soared 41%, the research outfit estimated.To contact Bloomberg News staff for this story: Gao Yuan in Beijing at ygao199@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Peter Elstrom at pelstrom@bloomberg.net, Edwin Chan, Colum MurphyFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


Mars has a brand new crater, and it sure is pretty

Mars has a brand new crater, and it sure is pretty Mars, like any other rocky world, has its fair share of craters. These scars of ancient impacts give the dusty surface of the planet some serious personality, and sometimes it's easy to forget that new craters can happen right before our eyes. That's exactly what seems to have occurred, and a new image from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter reveals a brand new impact site that might only be a few months old.The image, which was captured by the HiRISE camera built into the orbiter, shows a bold dark patch of material surrounding a circular crater on the Martian surface. Researchers believe it might have been created as recently as February 2019.The University of Arizona posted the photo, along with the following caption:> An impressionist painting? No, it's a new impact crater that has appeared on the surface of Mars, formed at most between September 2016 and February 2019. What makes this stand out is the darker material exposed beneath the reddish dust.The photo itself was captured in April and is only just now getting the attention it deserves. However, because the orbiter can't be looking at the entire planet at all times, it's unclear when exactly the crater formed, and researchers can only narrow it down to sometime between September 2016 and February 2019.This is yet another great reminder of the fantastic work NASA's Mars orbiter has been doing for years now. The spacecraft originally launched way back in 2005 and arrived at Mars in March of the following year. When it did, its primary mission was only scheduled to last for two years, but it has since put in over 13 years of faithful service for scientists. As long as it keeps producing images like this one, we hope it keeps going for a long time to come.


NASA’s asteroid probe snapped its closest photo yet of space rock Bennu

NASA’s asteroid probe snapped its closest photo yet of space rock Bennu NASA's OSIRIS-REx asteroid probe is giving scientists an even better look at the surface of the space rock known as Bennu now that it's moved even closer to the object. A new photo posted by the partnership between NASA and the University of Arizona gives us what might be our most detailed glimpse yet at the rock.The spacecraft has been hanging around Bennu for several months now, and will continue to do so for several more. Its new orbit, which its handlers call the Orbital B phase, brings it within a half mile of Bennu's surface, and this new photo shows us exactly what it sees as it orbits.The photo, which was posted to NASA's OSIRIS-REx web portal, comes with the following caption:> This image of asteroid Bennu was captured on Jun. 13, 2019, shortly after NASA's OSIRIS-REx spacecraft executed its second orbital insertion maneuver. From the spacecraft's vantage point in orbit, half of Bennu is sunlit and half is in shadow. Bennu's largest boulder can also be seen protruding from the southern hemisphere.The OSIRIS-REx team goes on to explain that, due to the incredibly short distance between the spacecraft and the asteroid, details "as small as 1.6 feet across" can be seen in the full-resolution image (available here).Getting a detailed look at Bennu's surface is about more than just capturing some fancy space eye candy. NASA has to know what every inch of the rock looks like in order to choose the best possible location for an eventual touchdown.Eventually, the probe will set down briefly on Bennu in order to snag a sample of its material for return to Earth. The asteroid is absolutely covered in debris, however, posing a serious challenge. In the months ahead, scientists will come up with a short list of possible landing locations and then narrow it down, and observations like this one will help them make their decision.


Watch as a Model 3 is transformed into the first Tesla pickup truck

Watch as a Model 3 is transformed into the first Tesla pickup truck For all of the hoopla surrounding Elon Musk's online antics and Tesla's ongoing struggles to ramp up Model 3 production, it's easy to overlook just how far the company has come in a relatively short period of time. In less than seven years time, Tesla managed to roll out the award-winning Model S, followed of course by the Model Y and the Model 3. It's worth noting that Tesla, during this seven-year period, has seen its deliveries and overall manufacturing figures skyrocket. As a prime example, Tesla during the first quarter of 2018 manufactured 34,494 vehicles. During the first quarter of 2019, just one year later, that figure jumped to 77,100 vehicles. All the while, Tesla has no plans of slowing down. Over the next few years, the company has plans to release a crossover version of the Model 3, a Tesla semi-truck, a next-gen Roadster, and last but not least, an electric pickup truck. Tesla's pickup truck plan is particularly intriguing given how popular pickup trucks are in the United States. Over the past few months, Musk has teased Tesla's somewhat mysterious pickup truck, noting that it will boast "incredible functionally from a load carrying standpoint" and that it will look more like a sci-fi truck than a traditional pickup truck. "That means that it’s not going to be for everyone," Musk said a few weeks ago, "like if somebody just wants to have a truck that looks like trucks have looked like for the last 20 to 40 years, it probably isn’t for them." With no definite timeline regarding a release date, or even an unveiling, an enterprising Model 3 owner and robotics enthusiast named Simone Giertz recently decided that she couldn't wait for Tesla to get around to releasing a pickup truck. So instead, she created one on her own out of a Model 3. The entire process was documented on YouTube and it's quite fascinating. "I don't know if this going to be the smartest or the most stupid thing I'm ever gonna do, but the bottom line is  I really want an electric pickup truck and more specifically I want a Tesla pickup," Giertz explains. Suffice it to say, the entire process was quite involved and not exactly straight forward. But after a lot of engineering and planning, the first Tesla pickup truck was borne into existence. It's not the most aesthetically pleasing design, but it's still quite an impressive achievement: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jKv_N0IDS2A She even went so far as to make a commercial for the fictional "Truckla" she designed: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R35gWBtLCYg


The Latest: 2 charged in huge cocaine bust at Philly port

The Latest: 2 charged in huge cocaine bust at Philly port Two members of a container ship's crew face federal drug charges after agents raided their vessel at a Philadelphia port and seized about 33,000 pounds (15,000 kilograms) of cocaine. Court documents filed Tuesday charge Ivan Durasevic and Fonofaavae Tiasage with conspiracy to possess cocaine aboard a ship subject to U.S. jurisdiction.


Historic US drug bust nets 16 tonnes of cocaine

Historic US drug bust nets 16 tonnes of cocaine US authorities said Tuesday they had seized around 16 tonnes of cocaine with an estimated street value of over $1 billion in a historic drug bust aboard a ship at the port of Philadelphia. "This is one of the largest drug seizures in United States history," tweeted William McSwain, the US attorney for the Eastern District of Philadelphia. "Members of the ship's crew have been arrested and federally charged" following the drug bust at Philadelphia's Packer Marine Terminal, McSwain's office said on Twitter.


Attorney: Deputy in clash with Raptors exec has concussion

Attorney: Deputy in clash with Raptors exec has concussion A deputy suffered a concussion and is on medical leave after an altercation with the president of the Toronto Raptors as he tried to join his team on the court to celebrate their NBA championship, a lawyer said Tuesday. The 20-year-veteran of the Alameda County Sheriff's Office also has a serious jaw injury and is considering filing a lawsuit against Raptors President Masai Ujiri, attorney David Mastagni said. The clash between the deputy and Ujiri happened as the deputy checked court-access credentials after the game Thursday in Oakland against the Golden State Warriors.


Attorney: Deputy considering lawsuit against Raptors' Ujiri

Attorney: Deputy considering lawsuit against Raptors' Ujiri A sheriff's deputy sustained serious injuries and is considering a lawsuit against Masai Ujiri after an altercation with the Toronto Raptors president following Thursday's title-clinching victory in Oakland, the deputy's attorney said. David Mastagni, the deputy's attorney, told Bay Area CBS affiliate KPIX late Monday that his client has a "serious concussion" and a "serious jaw injury" after an "unprovoked, significant hit to the jaw" caused by Ujiri. The altercation occurred when Ujiri was trying to get on the court after the Raptors beat the Golden State Warriors in Game 6 to win the NBA championship.


US launches hospital ship to countries absorbing Venezuelans

US launches hospital ship to countries absorbing Venezuelans Vice President Mike Pence declared Tuesday that Venezuela's authoritarian leader "must go" as the U.S. Navy launched a hospital ship on a five-month mission to help Latin American countries struggling to absorb migrants from the crisis-wracked country. Pence briefly toured the ship at Miami's cruise liner terminal ahead of its Wednesday departure to help Venezuelan migrants in countries including Colombia, Ecuador, Panama, Costa Rica and the Dominican Republic. After the tour, the vice president spoke before Venezuelan exiles, who have become an increasing presence in the swing state of Florida, where President Donald Trump chose to announce his reelection campaign later Tuesday in Orlando.


The Latest: Indiana AG's office plans vigorous defense

The Latest: Indiana AG's office plans vigorous defense The Indiana attorney general's office says it will vigorously defend him against a federal lawsuit by four women who say he drunkenly groped them during a party last year. The lawsuit filed Tuesday alleges sexual harassment by Republican state Attorney General Curtis Hill on a state lawmaker and three legislative staffers in March 2018 at an Indianapolis bar. Hill has denied wrongdoing and rebuffed calls from Republican Gov. Eric Holcomb to resign.


Google pledges $1 bn for housing crisis in Bay Area

Google pledges $1 bn for housing crisis in Bay Area Google on Tuesday pledged to commit more than $1 billion to help address the severe housing crisis in the region that includes its headquarters and Silicon Valley. Chief executive Sundar Pichai announced the initiative, saying the internet colossus wants to be "a good neighbor" in the area bursting with technology companies. The move comes with Silicon Valley firms under pressure over the spike in real estate prices, lack of affordable housing and growing homeless problem in the San Francisco Bay region.


Ex-ICE officials criticize Trump's tweet about upcoming deportation sweep

Ex-ICE officials criticize Trump's tweet about upcoming deportation sweep President Trump issued a public warning Monday night, by tweet, of a mass deportation effort by Immigration and Customs Enforcement to start next week. His tweet prompted sharp criticism from some former ICE officials.


NASA says there’s ‘no doubt’ SpaceX Crew Dragon explosion has pushed back crewed flights

NASA says there’s ‘no doubt’ SpaceX Crew Dragon explosion has pushed back crewed flights NASA desperately needs a way to get its astronauts into space without paying for pricey seats aboard Russian rockets, but the agency's two best hopes -- SpaceX and Boeing -- are stumbling a bit at the finish line. Boeing's Starliner has been plagued by delays nearly from the start, and SpaceX is now dealing with its own list of problems.In remarks to reporters at the Paris Airshow, NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine admitted that the recent destruction of a SpaceX Crew Dragon capsule during static testing is a major setback for NASA's crewed flight schedule. The race to be the first to deliver a suitable solution for NASA's needs now appears to be anyone's game."There is no doubt the schedule will change," Bridenstine reportedly said during his brief talk. "It won't be what was originally planned."Back in late April, something went seriously wrong during a static test of Crew Dragon's thrusters. The thrusters being tested were those that would spring into action if a launch had to be aborted after it had already lifted off. They're designed to push the crew capsule away from the rest of the launch vehicle, keeping the crew safe.Unfortunately, a glitch that so far has been described only as "an anomaly" occurred and the entire Crew Dragon capsule was destroyed in a fiery explosion. Details regarding exactly what went wrong have been scant, but both NASA and SpaceX are still conducting their investigations into the matter.Up until that point, SpaceX was clearly beating competitor Boeing in the race to finish a crew-capable NASA spacecraft. However, an explosion can be a pretty big setback, and now it's unclear when SpaceX will be able to resume its testing and get back on track. In the meantime, NASA will just have to wait.


Trump's pick for defense secretary withdraws as past domestic incidents surface

Trump's pick for defense secretary withdraws as past domestic incidents surface President Trump announced that acting Defense Secretary Patrick Shanahan has withdrawn from consideration to be his permanent defense chief as reports surfaced about a messy divorce that involved a violent incident.


Boeing's troubled 737 MAX gets huge vote of confidence from IAG

Boeing's troubled 737 MAX gets huge vote of confidence from IAG US aircraft giant Boeing got a welcome vote of confidence in its beleaguered 737 MAX plane on Tuesday when International Airlines Group, owner of British Airways, said it wanted to buy 200 of the planes. It was a coup for Boeing since up to now IAG has been a longtime client of Airbus for its single-aisle jets, used on some of its most popular routes. "We have every confidence in Boeing and expect that the aircraft will make a successful return to service in the coming months having received approval from the regulators," IAG's chief Willie Walsh said in a statement.


Photos of the 2020 Mercedes-AMG GLC63 S Coupe

Police: Mom drives into Michigan river; 3 dead

Police: Mom drives into Michigan river; 3 dead Authorities say they've found the body of a woman and her 9-year-old twin daughters after she intentionally drove a car carrying them into a southwestern Michigan river. (June 18)


How to Grill Pineapple for Tacos, Salsa, Sundaes, and More

Reynolds Wrap will pay someone $5,000 a week to travel across America eating ribs

Reynolds Wrap will pay someone $5,000 a week to travel across America eating ribs Grill masters and backyard barbecue bosses, listen up


Ocasio-Cortez accuses Trump administration of creating ‘concentration camps on the southern border’

Ocasio-Cortez accuses Trump administration of creating ‘concentration camps on the southern border’ The freshman Democrat sharply criticized the Trump administration's handling of migrants seeking asylum in the United States with rhetoric that drew the ire of some Republicans.


Saudi, Philippines airlines order Airbus, IAG goes for Boeing

Saudi, Philippines airlines order Airbus, IAG goes for Boeing Saudi Arabian Airlines, the kingdom's national airline, said Tuesday it had ordered 65 A320neo-type aircraft from Airbus, worth more than $7.4 billion at list prices, giving an early boost to the European manufacturer at the Paris Air Show. The deal is part of Saudi Arabian Airlines' plans to boost its A320neo fleet to up to 100 aircraft from 35 now. The additional aircraft will be deployed to support the national carrier's plan to boost capacity," Airbus said in a statement.


Erdogan attends prayers for Egypt's ex-president Morsi

Erdogan attends prayers for Egypt's ex-president Morsi Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan on Tuesday attended an Istanbul prayer service for former Egyptian leader Mohamed Morsi who died after collapsing during a trial hearing in a Cairo court. Erdogan, a key supporter of Morsi, joined the afternoon prayers at the historic Fatih mosque, an AFP photographer reported. Turkey's relations with Cairo deteriorated after the Egyptian military, then led by Abdel Fattah al-Sisi, ousted Morsi in 2013.


China earthquake kills 13, injures 199

China earthquake kills 13, injures 199 The toll from a strong 6.0-magnitude earthquake in southwest China rose to 13 dead and 199 injured on Tuesday as rescuers pulled bodies and survivors from wrecked buildings. More than 8,000 people were relocated as a large number of structures were damaged or collapsed after the quake struck late Monday near Yibin, in Sichuan province, according to the city government. Other images were of a woman being helped out of another collapsed structure.


White House will not invite Israeli officials to Bahrain event on grand Middle East plan

White House will not invite Israeli officials to Bahrain event on grand Middle East plan The White House will not invite Israeli government officials to a Bahrain conference devoted to gaining support for a Palestinian economic plan in order to keep the event apolitical, a senior administration official said on Monday. The official, speaking on condition of anonymity, said Palestinian business representatives are expected to attend the event in Manama on June 25-26, but not Palestinian government officials, who have boycotted a peace initiative led by White House senior adviser Jared Kushner. As a result, the administration decided not to extend an invitation to Israeli government officials to a conference expected to be attended by envoys from Arab governments as well as European nations. "We’re inviting the Israeli business people and Palestinian business people. We'd like to make it as apolitical as possible," the official said. When the Bahrain conference was announced last month, US officials initially suggested privately that Israeli government attendance in Bahrain would be an opportunity for Israel and some of its Gulf Arab neighbors to display in public the behind-the-scenes contacts that have grown in recent years, especially on security matters over their common enemy Iran. Benjamin Netanyahu, the Israeli prime minister, met with Jared Kushner in Jerusalem in May   Credit: Matty Stern/U.S. Embassy Jerusalem After the White House announced last week that Egypt and Jordan had agreed to attend, some Israeli diplomats said Israeli government officials were also likely to attend. But no formal invitation materialised. In Manama, Mr Kushner and President Donald Trump's Middle East envoy Jason Greenblatt are to unveil the economic part of Mr Trump's long-awaited Israeli-Palestinian peace plan. The plan, touted by Mr Trump as the "deal of the century," is to encourage investment in the West Bank and Gaza Strip by Arab donor countries before grappling with thorny political issues at the heart of the conflict. Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas has heaped scorn on the conference and urged Arab governments not to attend.


Trump calls Fox 'fake news' for citing unfavourable 2020 election polls

Trump calls Fox 'fake news' for citing unfavourable 2020 election polls Donald Trump has described Rupert Murdoch’s Fox News as “fake news” in a rare outburst against the organisation after it reported the results of its own polls showing significant Democrat candidate leads against the president.The polls by Fox showed Mr Trump trailing 10 percentage points behind Democratic hopeful Joe Biden when voters were asked who they would vote for if the election was now.Bernie Sanders, Elizabeth Warren, Kamala Harris and Pete Buttigieg were all also ahead of Mr Trump.In a tweet the US president said “something weird” was “going on at Fox”, and he attacked Bret Baier, the network’s chief political anchor.He said: “@FoxNews Polls are always bad for me. They were against Crooked Hillary also. Something weird going on at Fox. Our polls show us leading in all 17 Swing States. For the record, I didn’t spend 30 hours with @abcnews, but rather a tiny fraction of that. More Fake News @BretBaier.”Despite Mr Trump’s claim his campaign’s polls show him leading in “all 17 swing states”, this is disputed by people alleging to have worked on the polling.> .@FoxNews Polls are always bad for me. They were against Crooked Hillary also. Something weird going on at Fox. Our polls show us leading in all 17 Swing States. For the record, I didn’t spend 30 hours with @abcnews, but rather a tiny fraction of that. More Fake News @BretBaier> > — Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) > > June 17, 2019According to NBC, which cited “a person close to the campaign”, Mr Trump’s polling showed he “is trailing across swing states seen as essential to his path to re-election and in Democratic-leaning states where Republicans have looked to gain traction".The polls also reportedly showed Mr Trump is underperforming in normally dependable Republican-voting states which haven’t been important battlegrounds for decades in presidential elections.The president reportedly “cut ties” with some of his own polling team following the leaks.Mr Trump’s swipe at ABC News comes after the US broadcaster’s chief anchor George Stephanopoulos travelled with Mr Trump to Iowa on the president’s private jet, attended Oval Office Meetings and conducted a one-on-one interview with him.The president said he “enjoyed” the interview, but said it would be “so funny to watch the Fake News Media try to dissect & distort every word in as negative a way as possible".On two occasions Mr Trump addressed his comments on Twitter to @ABCNews, which is the Twitter handle for the Australian Broadcasting Corporation, which is different to @ABC, used by the American Broadcasting Company. On Tuesday Mr Trump repeatedly attacked the “fake news media”, ahead of his official 2020 campaign launch in Florida.“The Fake News doesn’t report it, but Republican enthusiasm is at an all time high,” he tweeted. “Look what is going on in Orlando, Florida, right now! People have never seen anything like it (unless you play a guitar). Going to be wild – See you later!”


War vet Sen. Duckworth on Trump draft deferments: ‘I'm sorry, but it's baloney’

War vet Sen. Duckworth on Trump draft deferments: ‘I'm sorry, but it's baloney’ He's stealing from the military,” Sen. Duckworth told the Yahoo News show “Through Her Eyes.” “He's sending troops to the border to sit around in the desert,” she added. Sen. Duckworth was not impressed. “He likes the idea of war. “He's been a warmonger for a very long time.


Far-right UK student jailed over Prince Harry online posts

Far-right UK student jailed over Prince Harry online posts A far-right university student who called Prince Harry a race traitor and created an image of him with a pistol to his head was on Tuesday jailed in Britain for more than four years. Michal Szewczuk, 19, posted the image, which also featured a blood-splattered swastika, on microblogging platform Gab in August last year, months after the prince married mixed-race actress Meghan Markle. Szewczuk, who was jailed for four years and three months, pleaded guilty to two counts of encouraging terrorism and five counts of possession of terrorist material, including the White Resistance Manual and an Al-Qaeda manual.


Oregon baker happy to get second chance after SCOTUS throws out wedding cake discrimination case

Oregon baker happy to get second chance after SCOTUS throws out wedding cake discrimination case The former owner of an Oregon bakery who refused to make a wedding cake for a gay couple says she's happy with the Supreme Court's decision to send the case back to the lower courts.


Venezuela's misery doesn't even spare the dead in Maracaibo

Venezuela's misery doesn't even spare the dead in Maracaibo Thieves have broken into some of the vaults and coffins in El Cuadrado cemetery since late last year, stealing ornaments and sometimes items from corpses as the country sinks to new depths of deprivation. "Starting eight months ago, they even took the gold teeth of the dead," said José Antonio Ferrer, who is in charge of the cemetery, where a prominent doctor, a university director and other local luminaries are buried. Much of Venezuela is in a state of decay and abandonment, brought on by shortages of things that people need the most: cash, food, water, medicine, power, gasoline.


The migrants risking it all on the deadly Rio Grande

The migrants risking it all on the deadly Rio Grande The 19-year-old pregnant migrant wades towards the US shore, deep enough in the Rio Grande for waves to splash against her waist. Pushing through the river’s current, and mindful of an alligator lingering upriver, she guides her friend’s crying 10-year-old boy towards a US border-patrol rescue boat. As the boat carries them on the final leg of their journey to the United States from Honduras, the young woman waves back to a group on Mexico’s riverbank cheering her rescue.The day before, border-patrol agents at the Eagle Pass river crossing in South Texas had found the body of a man too decomposed to be easily identified. A couple of days earlier, a video of a man desperately trying to swim against the current before going limp and sinking circulated in Mexican news media. And in early May, border-patrol agents at Eagle Pass pulled the body of a 10-month-old baby from the Rio Grande after a raft carrying nine migrants overturned. Only five survived.“The sad moments are the deaths. Unfortunately, we’ve seen some of those,” says Bryan Kemmett, the border-patrol agent in charge of Eagle Pass, a town of 29,000 about an hour from the larger Del Rio. “The more troubling ones, the ones more recently, are the small infants. When you see the small infant and you hear the infant dying, you think about your own children.”Migrants have for years traversed the Rio Grande on makeshift rafts to cross illegally into the United States. But facing a surge of families from Central America, border-patrol agents are now pulling dozens of migrants, including young children, from the harsh current of the river almost every day. President Donald Trump’s repeated threats and attempts to limit immigration have not deterred migrants. The US Customs and Border Protection agency took more than 144,200 into custody in May, the highest monthly total in 13 years.Policies that separated migrant children from their parents, forced asylum seekers to wait in Mexico for their day in court and detained teenagers in camps likened to juvenile prisons have done little to stem the immigration flow. So far in the current federal fiscal year, which began on 1 October, border-patrol agents have rescued at least 315 migrants from a 209-mile stretch of the Rio Grande – up from 12 migrants the year before.Earlier this month, a 40-year-old migrant woman collapsed at the Eagle Pass station about 30 minutes after crossing the river. She was declared dead at a hospital, and the authorities were investigating the cause of her death.Migrants who are interviewed for this article at Eagle Pass say they are well aware of the risks. But they also say they were convinced by human smugglers and by other migrants that crossing the Rio Grande, which can take about five to 10 minutes, was the fastest and least complicated way to start their requests for asylum, given the Trump administration’s clampdown at legal ports of entry.“The whole world crosses through the river,” says Yevy Leiva, 28, who steered a raft across the Rio Grande with his son and two other migrants. Nine days later, he waits in a shelter in Del Rio, packed with scores of other migrants, for a bus to Dallas to stay with friends. Only migrants who show visible distress or who are travelling with a child are rescued by border-patrol agents. And while far more migrants trying to slip into the United States die on land – from dehydration or other dangers in the desert and brush – the number of deaths in the Rio Grande is rising at an alarming rate.Over the past two fiscal years, at least 11 people have drowned in the Del Rio sector of the Rio Grande. By comparison, the border patrol recovered the remains of four people from the river from fiscal 2015 to fiscal 2017.Randy Davis, the acting deputy chief patrol agent of the border patrol for the Del Rio sector, blames the deluge of migrants on the human smugglers who are increasingly exploiting this stretch of the Rio Grande as a comparatively untapped path into the United States.Since 1 October, border-patrol agents in the Del Rio sector have arrested nearly 18,000 migrant family members – compared with 1,387 during the first eight months of fiscal 2018. Agents in the sector have also rescued nearly three times as many migrants in the water than agents in other sectors along the border with Mexico, taken together.Some of them were infants who had to be flown to a hospital in San Antonio after they nearly drowned, Kemmett says. Davis says he expects to find more bodies. “There have been hundreds and hundreds of rescues,” Davis says. “I’m trying to keep them all straight in my mind. I would suspect there are other individuals out there that were never reported missing that we will eventually recover at some point in the future.”The US border patrol has issued warnings in Mexico about the dangers of crossing the Rio Grande, and Kemmett says migrants have been urged to at least wear life jackets before making the attempt. He says the river’s levels have risen about 3ft because of a water release from a nearby hydroelectric dam and excessive rainfall. While the Rio Grande is shallow in some areas, other parts dip without warning to a depth of 8ft. Debris ricochets along the riverbed, and the banks are littered with inflatable tubes and Styrofoam noodles that migrants use to stay afloat.The river levels are expected to rise again soon and the dam releases to irrigate crops in and around Eagle Pass and to provide electricity for the town. Underscoring the dangers to the migrants, an alligator hid among river weeds one afternoon last month, floating just high enough to show the spikes along its back.“They’re navigating the currents, they’re navigating the river itself, and now you have alligators,” says Kemmett, a 24-year veteran of the border patrol. “An alligator is not going to know the difference between a child and a chicken, or any other small animal.” Migrants often head to the Rio Grande with one change of clothes as well as their identification and other documents in a plastic bag. After crossing successfully, some change into the dry clothes before they are taken to a border-patrol facility to be processed.> They’re navigating the currents, they’re navigating the river itself, and now you have alligatorsWalking along the riverbank in Eagle Pass, Kemmett stops to examine a shirt left in the weeds near the water. It belonged to a baby. “We’re seeing a lot of families,” he says. “But within those families, we’re seeing more and more younger infants. Trying to cross the river with a 2-month-old strapped to your chest or your back is not easy.”“It’s not easy to begin with,” Kemmett says, “but now you’re trying to hold on to your child. And the desperation and the panic gets in there, and then they start to struggle.” Once they cross the Rio Grande and touch US soil, the migrants are taken into custody by the border patrol. They are processed in centres that were built to detain migrants before they were deported.But the sheer number of incoming migrants – many of whom are seeking asylum and are travelling with children who, by US law, cannot be detained for more than 20 days – has created an overwhelming backlog in cases and crowding at the border processing facilities. As a result, the vast majority of migrants who illegally enter the United States are told to report to court at a later date and are released. From there, the migrants search out relatives or other places to stay while their cases wind their way through immigration court.Last month, the Trump administration began flying migrants from overcrowded centres elsewhere in the Rio Grande Valley in Texas to Del Rio to be processed. But agents in Del Rio say the processing facility there was also overcapacity; earlier this month, the authorities there built a tent city to house migrants. Storage areas that had been used for border-patrol equipment in Del Rio “are now storing baby formula, diapers, additional extra space for blankets, heat blankets they can wrap up in”, Davis says. Most of the migrants who are caught by the border patrol come to the United States to escape poverty in their home nations, Kemmett says, and do not appear to be the criminals that Trump has warned of in his campaign to limit immigration. Agents in Del Rio say there is no sign that the surge of migrant families will decline.Kemmett says the border-patrol agents he oversees are becoming “battle fatigued”. He also questions why migrants would knowingly put their children in that type of danger in attempting the perilous journey to the United States.For some of the immigrants, it is the only way to protect their families. Barefoot and balancing his 8-year-old daughter on his shoulders, Angel Gabriel, 39, crosses the Rio Grande and into Eagle Pass on a hot afternoon.He steadies his 32-year-old wife as they walk into the river current; she tightly grips their barefoot 16-year-old son. Border-patrol agents meet the family in the middle of the river and bring them to land. As soon as agents finish patting down Gabriel to ensure he is not carrying weapons or drugs, he rushes to his family members and embraces them. All four of them weep.“Truly thankful,” Gabriel says through tears as he sits in a border-patrol van with his family. He says they left Honduras after being attacked. “Thankful to the power of the United States that they helped us get out,” Gabriel says. “I feel thankful that my family is OK.”A few hours earlier, a pregnant Honduran woman took her first steps on US soil. She had briefly reconsidered crossing the Rio Grande after seeing pictures on Facebook a day earlier of an alligator in the river. But turning her head, she revealed a bruised jaw – the evidence of what she said was an attack by her domestic partner in Honduras.The woman, who said she was to give birth in about a week, wanted to apply for asylum in the United States and hoped to create a good life for her soon-to-be-born son. “The life with my partner was a risk,” she said as she looked at the river. “So this is nothing compared to that.”© New York Times


Venezuela Is Now Awash in U.S. Dollars

Venezuela Is Now Awash in U.S. Dollars (Bloomberg) -- Editors Note: There are few places as chaotic or dangerous as Venezuela. “Life in Caracas” is a series of short stories that seeks to capture the surreal quality of living in a land in total disarrayWe used to catch only rare glimpses of them in public. A waiter willing to risk jail time might be persuaded to accept them for the right price. Amateur tourists would flash them at the airport. Shady street hawkers made offers for them under their breath.Now, U.S. greenbacks are everywhere. They’re stacked high in cashiers’ drawers at supermarkets and bodegas and even make their way into panhandlers’ cups. The wealthy tip parking valets with singles and pull out wads of twenties to pay for buckets of beer. Currency traders casually set up on busy street corners in slums and shout, “Compro dolares, compro dolares”—“I buy dollars.”With the bolivar all but worthless, devalued into irrelevance by the autocrat Nicolas Maduro, the cash printed by the gringos he rails against has become king. It is beyond ironic that Washingtons and Benjamins—and not the domestic notes named for the South American independence hero—are keeping the consumer economy afloat.Until recently, using foreign money was a crime the government enthusiastically threatened to prosecute. After the ruling socialists established currency controls back in 2003, they began patrolling for transactions that ran afoul of their Kafkaesque rules about money. Plain-clothed inspectors ran stings and raided businesses.While very few people actually ended up behind bars, the government definitely succeeded in spooking everybody. We kept the bills tucked away for fear of sending signals to kidnappers and cops. We talked in code, calling them “lettuces” and “greens.” I conducted a few transactions in dollars in those days, swapping cash on a stove in a restaurant kitchen or in an empty office backroom. The recipients of my treacherous bills would nervously shut windows and doors as they led me away from prying eyes.It took inflation hitting six digits and widespread hunger for the regime to finally begin dismantling the complicated mess of controls. Now the authorities don’t blink when they see dollars bandied about. Their government is too broke and too dysfunctional to try to dictate the terms of commerce anymore. Their 21st Century socialism has given way to savage capitalism.The unwinding of the rules that began last August was welcome for anyone tired of dealing with the dizzying amount of zeros involved in bolivar prices, hauling around bundles of all-but-worthless notes and praying the credit-card reader would, just this once, work. Now we could use real money. It isn't terribly hard for anyone, rich or poor, to get their hands on dollars. People bring them into the country from visits to border towns in Colombia and Brazil or from travels further abroad.It was the great blackout, when most of Venezuela was without power and a functioning banking system, that accelerated the de facto dollarization of the economy. In the darkness, toting around hard currency was the only way you could be certain you’d manage to do any form of shopping.Once the lights finally—and mercifully—came back on, some stores and restaurants kept displaying prices in dollars. Now at the specialty shops that have been popping up in eastern Caracas, offering everything from Fruit Loops to homemade cookies to bottles of Budweiser, the clerks will tell you they’ll gladly accept an electronic transfer via Zelle or PayPal if you don’t have the cash.According to the calculations of one top bank executive, about 30% of all transactions are made in dollars these days. I’d be shocked if that percentage didn’t keep growing. Which seems to be making moot one of the big theoretical debates in opposition circles: whether to adopt the dollar as Venezuela’s currency if they finally manage to take power from the socialists. The people already have.\--With assistance from Fabiola Zerpa and Daniel Cancel.To contact the author of this story: Andrew Rosati in Caracas at arosati3@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: David Papadopoulos at papadopoulos@bloomberg.net, Anne ReifenbergFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


This Tank Could Stop a Chinese Invasion of Taiwan

This Tank Could Stop a Chinese Invasion of Taiwan The Trump administration’s plan to sell tanks, missiles and ground-launched air defenses to Taiwan embodies what might be called a strategic paradigm shift to empower the small island’s deterrence posture against an often-threatened Chinese invasion.While much existing discussion centers upon strengthening Taiwanese air, sea and undersea defenses, there also appears to be an unequivocal need for major land defenses. The existing air-sea emphasis is extremely important, yet there are certainly elements of this approach which invite further discussion about the need to provide Taiwan with a strong, armored ground force as well.The proposed $2 billion arms package includes 108 main battle tanks, 250 Stinger anti-air missiles, as well as 409 Javelins and 1,240 TOW anti-tank missiles.Drawing heavily upon a US Pacific presence along with Asian-theater allied support, a maritime-air Taiwan defense strategy has clearly had a deterrence impact in recent years. Part of this ability to keep a Chinese invasion at bay has naturally hinged upon a strong US posture ensuring defense of the island.


Forget Glock or Sig Sauer: This 100 Year Old Gun Might Be Better

Forget Glock or Sig Sauer: This 100 Year Old Gun Might Be Better The response of some weapons designers might have been to develop a fully automatic gun. If one bullet wouldn’t stop the enemy, three might. That would be the argument of a disposable, consumerist culture of overabundance, but we weren’t there yet. The 1911 was frugal with the bullets, but the ones it dished out really did the job.The 1911 is one of the most notorious handguns in history and easily the most famous in America, having seen action in every U.S. conflict since World War I. One of the most successful product designs ever, the 1911 has achieved something rare in the world of machines: immortality. Over a hundred years old, it remains largely unchanged.What Apple is to consumer electronics, John Browning was to late 19th and early 20th century firearms. The 1911 is his most famous design. The typical 1911 is 8.25 inches from tip to tail and weighs 2.49 pounds empty — about as much as a trade paperback book. The 1911 is made of steel, steel and more steel, and takes a magazine that holds seven bullets.The 1911 has seen service in World War I, Mexico, Haiti, Nicaragua, the Dominican Republic (twice), Lebanon, World War II, the Korean War, Vietnam, Iran, Grenada, Panama, the Gulf War, the Iraq War and Afghanistan. It has chased bad men from Pancho Villa to Osama Bin Laden.


Duterte Stands by China, Doubts Own Fishermen in Sea Collision

Duterte Stands by China, Doubts Own Fishermen in Sea Collision (Bloomberg) -- Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte is standing by China over a collision involving the two nations’ boats in the South China Sea, with his spokesman casting doubts on local fishermen’s accounts of the incident.In his first public statement about what he described as a “maritime incident,” Duterte said China’s side should be heard on the collision that resulted in a Philippine vessel carrying 22 fishermen sinking in disputed waters on June 9. The crew were rescued by a Vietnamese fishing boat and a Philippine Navy ship.“It is best investigated. I don’t issue a statement now because there’s no investigation and no result," Duterte said in speech at a Philippine Navy event on Monday night. "The only thing we can do is wait and give the other party the right to be heard.”The Philippines will not escalate tensions with China by sending military ships to the South China Sea following the collision, he added, reiterating his nation isn’t ready to go to war with Beijing.At a briefing Tuesday, Duterte’s spokesman Salvador Panelo said there are "circumstances that give doubt to the version" of the Filipino fishermen, including how most of them were asleep when the collision happened.“The President doesn’t want this to be blown into an international crisis,” Panelo said. “We are being careful because there will be repercussions if we make the wrong move.”‘Passive’ PolicyDuterte stuck to his pro-China stance despite calls from the opposition, led by Vice President Leni Robredo, to change his “passive” China policy by actively asserting the nation’s rights in the disputed waters. Robredo, in a Facebook post Sunday, also called on Duterte’s government to demand the Chinese fishermen’s trial in the Philippines.Duterte now has to convince the public that friendly ties with China is still the way to go, said Jay Batongbacal, director of the University of the Philippines’ Institute for Maritime Affairs and Law of the Sea.“Between the Philippine government and the Chinese government the friendship policy has been set, but this incident has happened and casts doubt on the sincerity and wisdom of it to the Filipino people,” Batongbacal said.The Philippines’ long-term position in the South China Sea dispute may be weakened if Duterte maintains his pro-Beijing stance after the incident, said Professor Jeffrey Ordaniel, a fellow at Hawaii-based foreign policy research institute Pacific Forum. “The Duterte administration’s China policy is unfortunately helping the Chinese pursue their maritime ambitions.”Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman Lu Kang described the incident as an “accidental collision" at briefing on Monday, adding that politicizing the collision “is not appropriate.” Beijing’s embassy in Manila earlier said the Chinese vessel’s captain tried to rescue the Philippine fishermen after bumping into their boat, but was afraid of being "besieged" by other Filipino fishing boats.The incident took place near Reed Bank, an area claimed by both Manila and Beijing where there’s a pending oil exploration plan by Philippines company PXP Energy Corp.\--With assistance from Dandan Li and Philip J. Heijmans.To contact the reporter on this story: Andreo Calonzo in Manila at acalonzo1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Cecilia Yap at cyap19@bloomberg.net, Ruth Pollard, Caroline AlexanderFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


Russia's 1st 5th Generation Stealth Fighter: Meet the Secret MiG 1.44

Russia's 1st 5th Generation Stealth Fighter: Meet the Secret MiG 1.44 Over the prior decade, Russia’s foray into fifth-generation jet fighter development has become synonymous with the upcoming Su-57. But the Su-57 was only Russia’s second attempt at developing a fifth-generation aircraft, preceded by several decades with an altogether different project.This is the story of the ill-fated MiG 1.44.In 1979, Soviet high command determined that a new generation of fighter aircraft was needed to ensure the competitiveness of the Soviet Air Force (VVS) into the 1990’s and beyond. The timing could not have been more apt; it was only several years later that the US air force began researching and developing what would become the highly capable F-22 fighter.The project, which became known as MFI or “Multifunctional Frontline Fighter,” established a set of core design criteria roughly corresponding with the Soviet and early Russian understanding of what makes a fifth-generation fighter: supermaneuverability, supercruise capability (sustained supersonic speeds without the use of afterburners), low radar cross-section, integrated avionics system, and substantially improved landing/takeoff capability.


Death toll from China quakes rises to 11

Death toll from China quakes rises to 11 BEIJING/SHANGHAI, June 18 (Reuters) - The death toll from two strong earthquakes in China rose to 11 on Tuesday, with 122 people injured, state media said, adding that rescuers pulled some survivors from rubble in a part of the country that often suffers strong tremors. The quakes, roughly 30 minutes apart, hit the southwestern province of Sichuan late on Monday, with shaking felt in key regional cities, such as the provincial capital of Chengdu and the metropolis of Chongqing. People rushed into the streets and cracks were left in some buildings by the quakes, pictures posted on the social media accounts of state media showed.


Egypt's ousted president Morsi dies in court during trial

Egypt's ousted president Morsi dies in court during trial Egypt's first democratically elected president, Islamist leader Mohammed Morsi who was ousted by the military in 2013 after a year in office, collapsed in court while on trial Monday and died, state TV and his family said. The 67-year-old Morsi had just addressed the court, speaking from the glass cage he is kept in during sessions and warning that he had "many secrets" he could reveal, a judicial official said. In his final comments, he continued to insist he was Egypt's legitimate president, demanding a special tribunal, one of his defense lawyers, Kamel Madour told the Associated Press.


Alex Jones Faces Court Action After Threatening Sandy Hook Lawyer

Alex Jones Faces Court Action After Threatening Sandy Hook Lawyer Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via GettyA Connecticut judge could impose penalties on InfoWars conspiracy theorist Alex Jones on Tuesday, after Jones aired a show where he punched a picture of an attorney representing Sandy Hook families and called the lawyer a “pimp.”In a motion filed Monday in Connecticut, attorneys for the Sandy Hook families asked the court to review Friday’s episode of InfoWars. In that show, Jones raged at attorney Chris Mattei, who’s representing Sandy Hook families suing Jones for saying the 2012 elementary school massacre never happened.While sitting next to his own attorney, Norm Pattis, Jones accused Mattei without evidence of planting child porn on InfoWars’s servers.“Total war!” Jones said. “You want it, you got it! I’m not into kids like your Democratic Party, you cocksuckers! So get ready!”Alex Jones Offers $1M Reward After Alleged ‘Malware’ Attack That He Says Planted Child Porn on His ServersWhile producing emails during the lawsuit’s discovery process, InfoWars accidentally handed over child pornography that had been emailed to the company by one or more anonymous people. The emails were then sent to a company handling document review for the Sandy Hook attorneys, the latest error in a discovery process that InfoWars and Jones have been frequently accused of hindering.  After receiving the images, the Sandy Hook attorneys contacted the FBI, who took over the document review process. In their motion, the attorneys say InfoWars could have avoided forwarding the emails if they had conducted “even minimal due diligence.” “They transmitted images to the plaintiffs that if they were knowingly possessed is a serious federal crime,” the attorneys say in the motion. In a statement, Pattis said InfoWars employees hadn’t opened the emails when they were originally received. “I spoke to federal prosecutors last week,” Pattis said. “They report that there is no indication anyone at InfoWars knowingly possessed child pornography. The items were embedded in emails sent to folks at InfoWars without ever having been opened.”On his Friday show, Jones concocted a conspiracy theory that Mattei had planted the child porn himself in an attempt to discredit InfoWars. Jones fumed at Mattei, calling him a “white-shoe boy that thinks he owns America.” Twitter Permanently Bans Alex Jones and InfowarsPattis appeared uncomfortable as Jones raged at the plaintiff’s attorney, at one point urging Jones to calm down and referring to Jones as “young man.” At one point during the show, Jones punched a picture of Mattei. Pattis told Jones to stop showing Mattei’s face on air, adding that they didn’t know who had sent InfoWars the child pornography.“I didn’t come on your show to be made out to be a naive fool,” Pattis said. The Sandy Hook attorneys urged the judge in the case to consider action against Jones over the show at a hearing on Tuesday. They haven’t specified yet what kind of action they want, but say in their motion that the court has an “obligation to protect” the lawyers on the case. Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.


See Photos of the Porsche 718 Cayman GT4

Exclusive: U.S. preparing to send more troops to Middle East - sources

Exclusive: U.S. preparing to send more troops to Middle East - sources The United States is preparing to send additional troops to the Middle East in response to mounting concerns over Iran, which Washington blames for attacks on oil tankers last week, two U.S. officials told Reuters on Monday, speaking on condition of anonymity. The officials did not say how many troops would be deployed or detail the timing of the deployment, which has not been previously reported. If confirmed, it would be in addition to the 1,500 troop increase announced last month in response to tanker attacks in May that it also blamed on Iran.


Suspected home intruder chased off by 11-year-old boy with machete

Suspected home intruder chased off by 11-year-old boy with machete An 11-year-old boy is making headlines after he chased off three home invadersby striking one of them with a machete last Friday morning, according to WTVD


NASA’s Mars 2020 rover finally has its head

NASA’s Mars 2020 rover finally has its head NASA's Mars 2020 mission will be its most ambitious trip to the Red Planet yet. The Mars 2020 rover is absolutely packed with the latest high-tech instruments, and while the mission isn't scheduled to begin until next summer, excitement is already building in a big way.Recently, NASA began hosting a live stream where viewers can watch its engineers slowly testing and assembling the components that will be shot skyward. As NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory boasts in a new blog post, the rover just got a huge addition in the form of its mast, which is the iconic "face" of any rover.The mast of the Mars 2020 rover is equipped with lenses and various sensors that will provide scientists back on Earth with a more detailed glimpse of the Martian surface than ever before. However, the mast will actually be folded flat for the trip between Earth and Mars.JPL explains:> During Mars 2020's launch, interplanetary cruise, and its fast and fiery descent toward the Martian surface, the mast will be in stowed flat on the rover's deck. Soon after touchdown, the mast (which tops out at over 7 feet, or 2.2 meters) will be raised to provide a high perch for the SuperCam, Mastcam-Z and Mars Environmental Dynamics Analyzerinstruments as well as four Navcam engineering cameras.That's a whole bunch of high-tech goodies that need to work perfectly, and hooking it all up takes time. According to JPL, the "selfie" above was snapped on June 5th after the mast was first attached, but its various instruments took another six days to fully integrate.The Mars 2020 mission is scheduled to get underway on July 17th, 2020, but it won't actually arrive on the Red Planet until February of 2021. We still have a bit of a wait on our hands, but once the rover is on the Red Planet it'll surely have some surprising discoveries to share with us.


This big bank is eliminating all fees on checking and savings accounts

This big bank is eliminating all fees on checking and savings accounts Discover is doing away with fees of any kind on its checking, savings, money market and certificate of deposit accounts.


Sea Dogs Beat Rock Cats To End Skid

Portland, Maine — William Cuevas, making his Double A debut, allowed one run and four hits in five innings as the Portland Sea Dogs beat the New Britain Rock Cats 4-1 Tuesday night at Hadlock Field.